Object #1018663 from MS-Papers-0032-0218

6 pages written by William Gilbert Mair in Alexandra to Henry Tacy Clarke

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0218 (56 digitised items). 50 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland and Waimate, 1871-1876

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Alexandra

Sept. 27th



My Dear Clarke

I gave you the substance of the result of the Kuiti meeting by telegram and have finished and sent a pretty full report to the office in Auckland. I am satisfied that great good will result from this meeting. We have broken down the outer wall and it is almost impossible to believe the change that has come over the King party. Of course they began with the old high flown bounce about Tawhiao's mana, roads, wires, surveys, bases etc. we heard them out, then Te Whero, Hone Te One, Te Maihi and others quietly patu'd every thing and the

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English (ATL)

former proposed that they should leave it to him to "Nawao korua ko te kawaratanga" he said "ki te ki koe kei whea te kainga moku, makei a ki atu waiho maku e hanga ki te pu toe toe, ki te taka koe ki te wai, hei aha ma wai kua ria-ta taua hara" (their hara being the Waikato war) Rewi at once accepted Te Wheoro's proposal and they all appeared very much pleased. Waikato did not take any public part but from conversations between them and our own people in Manuwhiri's hut it appears that the matter had been left with Maniapoto, and they (Waikato) were satisfied with what had taken place. Manuwhiri sang a song on the first day, which the Kupapa say is very friendly in tone, when I went to see him he said "ko au tenei ko to matua ko Manuwhiri, ko kae te tangata i ki ia ka haere mai, ko koe te Karaiti"? I thought it best to evade a reply. Tawhaio met me outside his house shook me very affectionately by the hand and asked me in, but nothing transpired it was merely a state visit, unsought for by me, however it is very significant of the improved attitude of the Hauhau party. In the evening Tu Tawhiao (the son) came and spent a couple of hours in my tent he is a fine smart young scamp, and is very anxious to come and see me here. Rewi I saw a great deal of he is a pleasant a man as I ever met, we are great friends, one of his speeches to me was "taku kupu kia Te Makarini i te Kopua, me hoki koe ki te hanga i te rakau hei patu moku, na homai ana ko koe ko te ingoa inaiemi ko Te Mea Mataora roku", he will be at Te Kopua in a few days planting for the hui in summer. The Kupapa's are keen for planting on a piece of land of Hone Te One's here and I have suggested that they be provided with send for all the land that they prepare at the hui in question I think that an amicable settlement may be come to. Nothing was said publicly about Todds murder, the Hau haus funk the subject awfully, while we were there

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English (ATL)

a letter arrived from the Ngapuhi chiefs urging them to give the murderers up, but no public discussion ensued although a crier tried to get the people together saying "haere mai kia rongo i te mate mou" I repeatedly heard Rewi and others speak casually of the "Kohuru" I could see that the perpetrators were in bad odour they form a small turbulent section who look with displeasure upon anything tending to bring about friendly relations The invitation to Ngapuhi has nothing political about it. Hone Te One reminded the King party of Potatau's maxims, "kia mau ki te pakeha, kia mau ki te whakapuro, kia mau ki te turi"! They answere "Koia tena" and shortly after the great korero was over Rewi said "he kupu na nga mea mate, ko Ngapuhi ka karangatia" (another of Potatau's maxims was "kia mau ki Ngapuhi) it was not till evening that the Ngapuhi letter arrived. Five men (Rainuha among them) were selected to go and invite Ngapuhi they came down with us and as we were getting into our canoe at Hettits, Rewi said, since we fought with Ngapuhi we have never cultivated their friendship in any way, we have never gone to "kimi huanga, ki te kimi taonga rami, pu raru" but now we want to be friends with everybody.

Page 4 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Rewi is fast becoming our friend. Old Manuwhiri I cannot very well make out.

Wahanui is a very influential and clever man he is their champion as it were. I do not know much of him yet but he appears to be straight forward, and was very cordial. When I left Te Kuiti we travelled by the same road for 3 or 4 miles, a man who met us said to Wahanui "Kei te arahi koe i te taonga ne"? He answered "hei aha i arahi ai! ki te raru Te Mea i te huarahi ka tanuku te rangi"!

I think that Tawhiao is a well meaning man, but he is so fenced about that he cannot exert his influence directly, their devotion to him is something remarkable. I hope to be able to cultivate him through his son I expect that the young fellow will be down here soon.

Whitiwa had nothing to say, but his manner was very friendly.

I went about the Kuiti taking walks of a mile or more, as I would

Page 5 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

in any other kainga, and never met with a black look from any one. It is not thirty miles from here, limestone country rather broken and about half wood half fern, it is a country that I should not much like invading. It is thickly inhabited from any hill top you see little kaing's in all directions, they appear to have plenty kai and are as well clad as the average. I saw Te Hura Hoani Poururu and some others of that party. The only people that disgusted me were the Hauhau Ngatihaua from Wharepapa, Kauaeroa and those parts they never made any speeches themselves but at the conclusion of any important speech from the Hauhau side they interrupted the proceedings with Karakia, in fact I was pretty weary of Karakia, night and morning they used to assemble in the veranda of our house (Te Kuiti) and Karakia, they use the same old string of English words (ronga rori, piki mautini teihana etc) as they did long ago, and their several "whaka moemiti" or extempore prayers, by any body who is moved, I did not witness any of the "attitudes of deep reverence" nor hear any of the "beautiful prayers" duly recorded by Firth and C.O. Davis.

I have not had even a telegram from Dr. Pollen or Kemp since you left.

Touching this Ngapuhi visit I think that it ought to be encouraged, if some good men were selected and well primed before leaving Town, something might be made of it.

I should have mentioned before that I never said anything in public except when I was taki'd at the different places, and then I confined myself to a few friendly remarks. Our party spoke very creditably, Te Wheoro is a cpaital fellow.

Page 6 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Will it do for me to make some presents to any of the leading kingites if they come here? Will you let me know quickly, I was very nearly starting off overland to see you on my return from Te Kuiti, but I was seedy with a bad cold.

No answer yet about a karere for me here.

I see that Hopkin has had a novel addition to his family, will you rub him up about that £8 cheque, I have heard nothing since I saw you.

Mr. McLean has declined to buy the house, I am sorry becaue I have been spending a good deal of money on it, I have not heard anything about my pay yet I have not received any since the cheque sent by Hopkins.

Huhana writes to ask if Wepiha has been appointed an assessor.


Yours very faithufully
W. G. Mair

English (ATL)

Alexandra

Sept. 27th



My Dear Clarke

I gave you the substance of the result of the Kuiti meeting by telegram and have finished and sent a pretty full report to the office in Auckland. I am satisfied that great good will result from this meeting. We have broken down the outer wall and it is almost impossible to believe the change that has come over the King party. Of course they began with the old high flown bounce about Tawhiao's mana, roads, wires, surveys, bases etc. we heard them out, then Te Whero, Hone Te One, Te Maihi and others quietly patu'd every thing and the former proposed that they should leave it to him to "Nawao korua ko te kawaratanga" he said "ki te ki koe kei whea te kainga moku, makei a ki atu waiho maku e hanga ki te pu toe toe, ki te taka koe ki te wai, hei aha ma wai kua ria-ta taua hara" (their hara being the Waikato war) Rewi at once accepted Te Wheoro's proposal and they all appeared very much pleased. Waikato did not take any public part but from conversations between them and our own people in Manuwhiri's hut it appears that the matter had been left with Maniapoto, and they (Waikato) were satisfied with what had taken place. Manuwhiri sang a song on the first day, which the Kupapa say is very friendly in tone, when I went to see him he said "ko au tenei ko to matua ko Manuwhiri, ko kae te tangata i ki ia ka haere mai, ko koe te Karaiti"? I thought it best to evade a reply. Tawhaio met me outside his house shook me very affectionately by the hand and asked me in, but nothing transpired it was merely a state visit, unsought for by me, however it is very significant of the improved attitude of the Hauhau party. In the evening Tu Tawhiao (the son) came and spent a couple of hours in my tent he is a fine smart young scamp, and is very anxious to come and see me here. Rewi I saw a great deal of he is a pleasant a man as I ever met, we are great friends, one of his speeches to me was "taku kupu kia Te Makarini i te Kopua, me hoki koe ki te hanga i te rakau hei patu moku, na homai ana ko koe ko te ingoa inaiemi ko Te Mea Mataora roku", he will be at Te Kopua in a few days planting for the hui in summer. The Kupapa's are keen for planting on a piece of land of Hone Te One's here and I have suggested that they be provided with send for all the land that they prepare at the hui in question I think that an amicable settlement may be come to. Nothing was said publicly about Todds murder, the Hau haus funk the subject awfully, while we were there a letter arrived from the Ngapuhi chiefs urging them to give the murderers up, but no public discussion ensued although a crier tried to get the people together saying "haere mai kia rongo i te mate mou" I repeatedly heard Rewi and others speak casually of the "Kohuru" I could see that the perpetrators were in bad odour they form a small turbulent section who look with displeasure upon anything tending to bring about friendly relations The invitation to Ngapuhi has nothing political about it. Hone Te One reminded the King party of Potatau's maxims, "kia mau ki te pakeha, kia mau ki te whakapuro, kia mau ki te turi"! They answere "Koia tena" and shortly after the great korero was over Rewi said "he kupu na nga mea mate, ko Ngapuhi ka karangatia" (another of Potatau's maxims was "kia mau ki Ngapuhi) it was not till evening that the Ngapuhi letter arrived. Five men (Rainuha among them) were selected to go and invite Ngapuhi they came down with us and as we were getting into our canoe at Hettits, Rewi said, since we fought with Ngapuhi we have never cultivated their friendship in any way, we have never gone to "kimi huanga, ki te kimi taonga rami, pu raru" but now we want to be friends with everybody. Rewi is fast becoming our friend. Old Manuwhiri I cannot very well make out.

Wahanui is a very influential and clever man he is their champion as it were. I do not know much of him yet but he appears to be straight forward, and was very cordial. When I left Te Kuiti we travelled by the same road for 3 or 4 miles, a man who met us said to Wahanui "Kei te arahi koe i te taonga ne"? He answered "hei aha i arahi ai! ki te raru Te Mea i te huarahi ka tanuku te rangi"!

I think that Tawhiao is a well meaning man, but he is so fenced about that he cannot exert his influence directly, their devotion to him is something remarkable. I hope to be able to cultivate him through his son I expect that the young fellow will be down here soon.

Whitiwa had nothing to say, but his manner was very friendly.

I went about the Kuiti taking walks of a mile or more, as I would in any other kainga, and never met with a black look from any one. It is not thirty miles from here, limestone country rather broken and about half wood half fern, it is a country that I should not much like invading. It is thickly inhabited from any hill top you see little kaing's in all directions, they appear to have plenty kai and are as well clad as the average. I saw Te Hura Hoani Poururu and some others of that party. The only people that disgusted me were the Hauhau Ngatihaua from Wharepapa, Kauaeroa and those parts they never made any speeches themselves but at the conclusion of any important speech from the Hauhau side they interrupted the proceedings with Karakia, in fact I was pretty weary of Karakia, night and morning they used to assemble in the veranda of our house (Te Kuiti) and Karakia, they use the same old string of English words (ronga rori, piki mautini teihana etc) as they did long ago, and their several "whaka moemiti" or extempore prayers, by any body who is moved, I did not witness any of the "attitudes of deep reverence" nor hear any of the "beautiful prayers" duly recorded by Firth and C.O. Davis.

I have not had even a telegram from Dr. Pollen or Kemp since you left.

Touching this Ngapuhi visit I think that it ought to be encouraged, if some good men were selected and well primed before leaving Town, something might be made of it.

I should have mentioned before that I never said anything in public except when I was taki'd at the different places, and then I confined myself to a few friendly remarks. Our party spoke very creditably, Te Wheoro is a cpaital fellow. Will it do for me to make some presents to any of the leading kingites if they come here? Will you let me know quickly, I was very nearly starting off overland to see you on my return from Te Kuiti, but I was seedy with a bad cold.

No answer yet about a karere for me here.

I see that Hopkin has had a novel addition to his family, will you rub him up about that £8 cheque, I have heard nothing since I saw you.

Mr. McLean has declined to buy the house, I am sorry becaue I have been spending a good deal of money on it, I have not heard anything about my pay yet I have not received any since the cheque sent by Hopkins.

Huhana writes to ask if Wepiha has been appointed an assessor.


Yours very faithufully
W. G. Mair

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0218 (56 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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