Object #1018601 from MS-Papers-0032-0817

4 pages written 10 Jan 1859 by Archibald John McLean in Maraekakaho to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items). Letters written on board ship or from various ports, 1847-1858 prior to his arrival in New Zealand in mid-1858. From then on the letters are almost all written from Maraekakaho about station matters.

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Jany 10th 1859

Maraekakaho

My dear Donald

I supose you will be longing to hear from me with tideings as to how matters are getting on here. The sheep were beautifully washed with but very little trouble and they would have been all shorn by the time but we have had dreadful weather with rain and obliged to send part of the shearers away home twice. I intended delaying writing till we were finished but as I know you will be anxious to hear how things are going on I do not wait as the weather may continue this way some time. There is 1600 shorn and 18 well packed bales got of them two of the bales lamb wool. I superintended the shearing and packing myself and McInnis with a Maori occasionally. From what they tell me there is about 2000 more to shear mostley all ewes and will make about the same amount. I am also keeping a correct account of the sheep as they are shorn so as to know how things are and how the sheep are. Dommett sent 800 breeding ewes to his run the other day which will render that place usless to any one now. It is from what I can see a pity Alex ever troubled with it or shuch a party without a thorough agreement on the spot. I earnestly request of him to get paid

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English (MD)

all the expences he has been at as soon as possible and let them make picks and whistles of their place for in all my experience I never came across such a set of boys. It is a pity for Gasgoine's sake they ever came near this place as they have imbibed him with all kind of foolish notions. Alex and myself has held many quarrels regarding them. The most carless and most presumtious wreches ever I saw. Gasgoin is just as carless. He cannot think of taking the lest care of anything belonging to himself indeed I have gavin over gaving any advice now as I find it needless. He will get more stayed I hope after he is quit of them. Alex poor fellow has been very poorley for the last ten days the effect of the most changeable climate we have had of late. We shore part of wheat yesterday. I think we will have on the 4 acres about 60 to 70 bushels but thank God the potatoes are splendid and the gardin is beautiful. The Indian corn promises well and we expect a good crop had it not been for the insects. A finer crop of peas could not have grown than we had. On Christmas we had a feast of every

Page 3 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

kind of good thing out of the gardin. If it was not for the potatoes and turnips those shearers Maories would eate us out of house and home. But what grows on the place is not mised. You must impress on Alex the necessity of improving the ewe by putting the sheep upon it now and if we can only fence in 1000 acres and get it under grass it is better than bantering with other peoples places. My own oppinion is by doing that will increase the value of this place and make it keep a large stock in time without the assistance of the Maori ground. Whenever the shearing is over I am going to the bush again to prepair timber for a dwelling house which I hope we will have up before the winter comes on. Do see and get the trees you mentioned in proper season and see and get some of the blue gum seed as I find it has done well with our neighbours. I hope and trust you will come down before long so that you can see what can be done about our sisters. I will write you again after the shearing is over all the news from here. I wrote Jessy some time ago but I have had no answer as yet. I hope she is well. I would like to hear from her as I often dream about him and her being very fond of them both. I hope my dear little Douglas

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

is daily improving at school and will not be spoiled for he is the making of a noble man if he lives. When I get my wife and what little that belongs to us invested in land I will consider myself quite well of as I will grow all that I want arround me with the exception of tea and sugar and a few cloths I ought to have been in New Zealand 10 years ago if so I would be comfortable now. I think but if industry will do I do not yet dispair. My respects to Aunty. I supose she is in Auckland still. I now must end wishing you and all friends in Auckland many happy returns of the season, ever


Remaining your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

PS. My kind regards to Mr Strang if still in Auckland. A J McLean

English (MD)

Jany 10th 1859

Maraekakaho

My dear Donald

I supose you will be longing to hear from me with tideings as to how matters are getting on here. The sheep were beautifully washed with but very little trouble and they would have been all shorn by the time but we have had dreadful weather with rain and obliged to send part of the shearers away home twice. I intended delaying writing till we were finished but as I know you will be anxious to hear how things are going on I do not wait as the weather may continue this way some time. There is 1600 shorn and 18 well packed bales got of them two of the bales lamb wool. I superintended the shearing and packing myself and McInnis with a Maori occasionally. From what they tell me there is about 2000 more to shear mostley all ewes and will make about the same amount. I am also keeping a correct account of the sheep as they are shorn so as to know how things are and how the sheep are. Dommett sent 800 breeding ewes to his run the other day which will render that place usless to any one now. It is from what I can see a pity Alex ever troubled with it or shuch a party without a thorough agreement on the spot. I earnestly request of him to get paid all the expences he has been at as soon as possible and let them make picks and whistles of their place for in all my experience I never came across such a set of boys. It is a pity for Gasgoine's sake they ever came near this place as they have imbibed him with all kind of foolish notions. Alex and myself has held many quarrels regarding them. The most carless and most presumtious wreches ever I saw. Gasgoin is just as carless. He cannot think of taking the lest care of anything belonging to himself indeed I have gavin over gaving any advice now as I find it needless. He will get more stayed I hope after he is quit of them. Alex poor fellow has been very poorley for the last ten days the effect of the most changeable climate we have had of late. We shore part of wheat yesterday. I think we will have on the 4 acres about 60 to 70 bushels but thank God the potatoes are splendid and the gardin is beautiful. The Indian corn promises well and we expect a good crop had it not been for the insects. A finer crop of peas could not have grown than we had. On Christmas we had a feast of every kind of good thing out of the gardin. If it was not for the potatoes and turnips those shearers Maories would eate us out of house and home. But what grows on the place is not mised. You must impress on Alex the necessity of improving the ewe by putting the sheep upon it now and if we can only fence in 1000 acres and get it under grass it is better than bantering with other peoples places. My own oppinion is by doing that will increase the value of this place and make it keep a large stock in time without the assistance of the Maori ground. Whenever the shearing is over I am going to the bush again to prepair timber for a dwelling house which I hope we will have up before the winter comes on. Do see and get the trees you mentioned in proper season and see and get some of the blue gum seed as I find it has done well with our neighbours. I hope and trust you will come down before long so that you can see what can be done about our sisters. I will write you again after the shearing is over all the news from here. I wrote Jessy some time ago but I have had no answer as yet. I hope she is well. I would like to hear from her as I often dream about him and her being very fond of them both. I hope my dear little Douglas is daily improving at school and will not be spoiled for he is the making of a noble man if he lives. When I get my wife and what little that belongs to us invested in land I will consider myself quite well of as I will grow all that I want arround me with the exception of tea and sugar and a few cloths I ought to have been in New Zealand 10 years ago if so I would be comfortable now. I think but if industry will do I do not yet dispair. My respects to Aunty. I supose she is in Auckland still. I now must end wishing you and all friends in Auckland many happy returns of the season, ever


Remaining your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

PS. My kind regards to Mr Strang if still in Auckland. A J McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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