Object #1018489 from MS-Papers-0032-0311

4 pages written 10 Jun 1850 by Henry Halse in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items). 36 letters and memos written from Wanganui, Wellington and Auckland (some in Maori)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

New Plymouth
June 10th. 1850.


Dear Sir,

I have posted the usual correspondence by this day's overland mail, (including a letter to you from Wellington), and as the Scotia sails in the course of the day for Wellington, this may catch you in your wanderings. At all events you will see there is no chance of escape, while you continue between Wanganui and the port for which this is destined.

I write to say that Mr. Smart has altered his intention of cutting more wood from the half section, which I marked on the drawing with a parallelogram, and which is marked white in your map. So far so well. It now remains for me to see Martin, the native who has most to say in the business, and with whom I hope to arrange.

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English (ATL)


In putting the annual questions to the men, I did not expect any of them would be anxious to leave, for this simple reason, that the principal duty of the Police in this settlement is with the natives, a duty carried on almost entirely without their knowledge. I am, however, careful in avoiding the old system of loitering about the Barracks, by sending them about the town in different directions, and occasionally employing one or two about the Barracks.

The prisoner Ross commenced work this morning at the Henui bridge, in charge of one of the Police, and will continue for one month from this date.

Williamd Stewart has been engaged at Mr. Gudgeon's this morning, and will be required 2 or 3 days more, owing to the slowness of the carpenter.

Newsham appears to me to have nothing on earth to do at Omata. He

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English (ATL)

comes to the Barracks once a week at irregular hours on Saturdays, stays a short time, walks down to town, returns for orders, and back again to his station. It is right you should know this. Indeed, Newsham does not hesitate to say that he attends daily to his own private affairs; and when I asked him if he had any intention to leave on the 18th. he replied with a smile that he had not, and was perfectly satisfied with the present arrangement.

By Captain King's direction, two of the Police will assist in the removal of the Harris's to Mr. Priske's farm, where they are to be taken, by the consent of the latter. Pascoe, the eldest son, is to placed under the care of Mrs. Fall. Louisa is living with the Sharlands; and the two remaining branches will be provided for.

Everything is quiet.


Being faithfully yours (Signed)
H. Halse.

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English (ATL)


P.S. Captain Campbell has been indisposed. He called this morning, and looked as well as ever.

Watt is about as usual.

I hear Honi Ropiha is in Hospital, and will go and enquire the occasion. I hope you are well, and thinking of returning to the old quarters.

(Signed)
H.H.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth
June 10th. 1850.


Dear Sir,

I have posted the usual correspondence by this day's overland mail, (including a letter to you from Wellington), and as the Scotia sails in the course of the day for Wellington, this may catch you in your wanderings. At all events you will see there is no chance of escape, while you continue between Wanganui and the port for which this is destined.

I write to say that Mr. Smart has altered his intention of cutting more wood from the half section, which I marked on the drawing with a parallelogram, and which is marked white in your map. So far so well. It now remains for me to see Martin, the native who has most to say in the business, and with whom I hope to arrange.

In putting the annual questions to the men, I did not expect any of them would be anxious to leave, for this simple reason, that the principal duty of the Police in this settlement is with the natives, a duty carried on almost entirely without their knowledge. I am, however, careful in avoiding the old system of loitering about the Barracks, by sending them about the town in different directions, and occasionally employing one or two about the Barracks.

The prisoner Ross commenced work this morning at the Henui bridge, in charge of one of the Police, and will continue for one month from this date.

Williamd Stewart has been engaged at Mr. Gudgeon's this morning, and will be required 2 or 3 days more, owing to the slowness of the carpenter.

Newsham appears to me to have nothing on earth to do at Omata. He comes to the Barracks once a week at irregular hours on Saturdays, stays a short time, walks down to town, returns for orders, and back again to his station. It is right you should know this. Indeed, Newsham does not hesitate to say that he attends daily to his own private affairs; and when I asked him if he had any intention to leave on the 18th. he replied with a smile that he had not, and was perfectly satisfied with the present arrangement.

By Captain King's direction, two of the Police will assist in the removal of the Harris's to Mr. Priske's farm, where they are to be taken, by the consent of the latter. Pascoe, the eldest son, is to placed under the care of Mrs. Fall. Louisa is living with the Sharlands; and the two remaining branches will be provided for.

Everything is quiet.


Being faithfully yours (Signed)
H. Halse.

P.S. Captain Campbell has been indisposed. He called this morning, and looked as well as ever.

Watt is about as usual.

I hear Honi Ropiha is in Hospital, and will go and enquire the occasion. I hope you are well, and thinking of returning to the old quarters.

(Signed)
H.H.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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