Object #1018312 from MS-Papers-0032-0827

5 pages written 3 Mar 1851 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items). Letters between Donald McLean and Susan. Donald's letters written from Hawke's Bay, Rangitikei, Taita and Wairapapa. Susan's letters from Dalmuir Hill, Wellington (the home of her parents (Robert and Susannah Strang).

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
March 3rd 1851


My dear Mr McLean

I was sorry that I did not hear from you by the Rose which came in a few days ago. I suppose you had not returned to Ahuriri when it left.

I hope by this time that you have nearly finished your work at the East Coast and I trust that the next letter which I receive from you I shall hear that you will soon be back to Wellington. You have no idea dear how glad I shall be to see you for I never felt so happy as when you are

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English (MD)

here. Mrs Durie is still here. They intend to go home this week. Last week Mama and some others of Mrs Durie's friends got up a picnic for her. The place we went to was Ngauranga. It was a large party and every one seemed to enjoy it very much. Ngauranga is a nice place for a picnic. We could not have chosen a better [place]. It is a good distance from town.

The only news which I have heard is that Margaret Paul is shortly to be married to Mr Hunter. I was rather surprised to hear it for I never thought that Mr Hunter was likely to marry soon on account of his sisters and everyone supposed that Miss Paul would marry an officer. It will be a very good marriage for her for I am sure there is not a better young

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English (MD)

man in Wellington. Mr Paul is much better but he is still very weak. I saw him a few days ago for the first time since his illness and I was quite sorry to see him. He is so much changed.

Mama has been very unwell lately. I think the weather has had a great effect upon her. It has been such an unusually warm and dry summer. For two months we have had scarcely any rain and the heat has sometimes been quite unsufferable. The consequence of every thing being so dry there have been a great number of fires in all directions which alarmed some of the people in the bush very much. Two houses were burnt down and at Karori Mr Chapman's house was in such great danger that all the furniture and

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English (MD)

books were taken out. At Captain Sharp's farm on the Porirua road they had to sit up for several nights watching. We got a fright a few days ago. The grass caught fire in James's ground which is close to us. The wind was from the south east and the fire rapidly came nearer us which alarmed us very much. I went down to Mr Stokes to get the man who was at work there. At the gate I met Mr Stokes, he had seen the fire and was going to get some men. All the people from the brick kiln came up and a great number of soldiers. They soon succeeded in getting it put out. It is fortunate that there was assistance so near for if it had not been put out immediately our house and Mr Stokes's might have been burnt down. The next day Mr Fitzherbert's

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English (MD)

house had a narrow escape. The grass and flax on the hill took fire and before it could be put out it had nearly reached the house. I think I must now conclude as it is getting very late. Mama desired me to give her kindest regards. Good night dear and believe me to remain


ever your affectionate
Susan Douglas Strang

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
March 3rd 1851


My dear Mr McLean

I was sorry that I did not hear from you by the Rose which came in a few days ago. I suppose you had not returned to Ahuriri when it left.

I hope by this time that you have nearly finished your work at the East Coast and I trust that the next letter which I receive from you I shall hear that you will soon be back to Wellington. You have no idea dear how glad I shall be to see you for I never felt so happy as when you are here. Mrs Durie is still here. They intend to go home this week. Last week Mama and some others of Mrs Durie's friends got up a picnic for her. The place we went to was Ngauranga. It was a large party and every one seemed to enjoy it very much. Ngauranga is a nice place for a picnic. We could not have chosen a better [place]. It is a good distance from town.

The only news which I have heard is that Margaret Paul is shortly to be married to Mr Hunter. I was rather surprised to hear it for I never thought that Mr Hunter was likely to marry soon on account of his sisters and everyone supposed that Miss Paul would marry an officer. It will be a very good marriage for her for I am sure there is not a better young man in Wellington. Mr Paul is much better but he is still very weak. I saw him a few days ago for the first time since his illness and I was quite sorry to see him. He is so much changed.

Mama has been very unwell lately. I think the weather has had a great effect upon her. It has been such an unusually warm and dry summer. For two months we have had scarcely any rain and the heat has sometimes been quite unsufferable. The consequence of every thing being so dry there have been a great number of fires in all directions which alarmed some of the people in the bush very much. Two houses were burnt down and at Karori Mr Chapman's house was in such great danger that all the furniture and books were taken out. At Captain Sharp's farm on the Porirua road they had to sit up for several nights watching. We got a fright a few days ago. The grass caught fire in James's ground which is close to us. The wind was from the south east and the fire rapidly came nearer us which alarmed us very much. I went down to Mr Stokes to get the man who was at work there. At the gate I met Mr Stokes, he had seen the fire and was going to get some men. All the people from the brick kiln came up and a great number of soldiers. They soon succeeded in getting it put out. It is fortunate that there was assistance so near for if it had not been put out immediately our house and Mr Stokes's might have been burnt down. The next day Mr Fitzherbert's house had a narrow escape. The grass and flax on the hill took fire and before it could be put out it had nearly reached the house. I think I must now conclude as it is getting very late. Mama desired me to give her kindest regards. Good night dear and believe me to remain


ever your affectionate
Susan Douglas Strang

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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