Object #1018260 from MS-Papers-0032-0319

6 pages written 27 Jan 1855 by William Halse in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items). 28 letters addressed from New Plymouth & Taranaki

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

COPY New Plymouth
27th. January 1855


My dear McLean,

You will hear from different sources, of the last movement amongst our natives, which ocurred on Thursday last, (the day before yesterday). It seems that Katatori's people have, of late, prowled about the Half-way House; and as their object in doing so, was not understood, and moreover

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English (ATL)

occasioned uneasiness within the pa, as attempt was made to cut them off on their next visit. Raniera and party laid an ambuscade near Kaipahupako. Katatori and his people soon took their usual march towards the Half-way House, and were suddenly surprised by a firing in their rear, which threatened their retreat. But Katatori seemed to be equal to the emergency, and after an irregular and blind firing of some continuance, got back to his place with his wounded, amounting to 5 or 6. On "our" side, for distinction sake, three were wounded, including Raniera, - a ball having passed through his thigh. Karipa was very nearly captured, which would have been a great triumph for the other side. Ihaia and Mahau, with their men, were also concealed, and took part in the fray; but the enemy,

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English (ATL)

as ill-luck would have it, did not take the direction in which they were placed. Otherwise, as the natives say, he must have made for Waitara. The Half-way natives are quite in feather at this brush, and talk loudly of further operations on their part.

Our people have been greatly alarmed by earthquakes of late, which rather upset me. Lots of chimneys are down, tottering, or crashed. The "Josephine Willis" experienced the

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English (ATL)

worst of them, 150 miles from land, at half past 9 p.m. about the time we were running one at our houses. She is 94 days from England, and though she sailed after the "Royal Stuart" brings no later news from Europe. She has about 150 people for Auckland, and some half dozen for us; and will proceed on her way to her destination this day. We were anxiously looking for the "Nelson", which will wait at Auckland for the "W. Denny."

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English (ATL)


Rogan, as I have already stated, is here; and attempted the other day to resume the Hua survey. The natives had arranged to work, but they put him off for the fight, and he does not expect they will subside for a time. If you do not want him in another part, he might remain for a reasonable time, a charge on the natives; and when not employed, assist Carrington in the office, plan-making for Crown Grants.

We are so busy here in the office that I have lost my trip by the Coast. I did intend going one way or the other, but must put it off, I suppose. You, we imagine, to be well away from Wellington; as we have neither heard from, or of you.


sincerely yours (Signed)
W. Halse.
P.S. I have received from Auckland, 2 accounts approved; one for survey labour at Mokau (£21.12/-) and for Raniera's horse (£55) (Signed)
W.H.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

COPY New Plymouth
27th. January 1855


My dear McLean,

You will hear from different sources, of the last movement amongst our natives, which ocurred on Thursday last, (the day before yesterday). It seems that Katatori's people have, of late, prowled about the Half-way House; and as their object in doing so, was not understood, and moreover occasioned uneasiness within the pa, as attempt was made to cut them off on their next visit. Raniera and party laid an ambuscade near Kaipahupako. Katatori and his people soon took their usual march towards the Half-way House, and were suddenly surprised by a firing in their rear, which threatened their retreat. But Katatori seemed to be equal to the emergency, and after an irregular and blind firing of some continuance, got back to his place with his wounded, amounting to 5 or 6. On "our" side, for distinction sake, three were wounded, including Raniera, - a ball having passed through his thigh. Karipa was very nearly captured, which would have been a great triumph for the other side. Ihaia and Mahau, with their men, were also concealed, and took part in the fray; but the enemy, as ill-luck would have it, did not take the direction in which they were placed. Otherwise, as the natives say, he must have made for Waitara. The Half-way natives are quite in feather at this brush, and talk loudly of further operations on their part.

Our people have been greatly alarmed by earthquakes of late, which rather upset me. Lots of chimneys are down, tottering, or crashed. The "Josephine Willis" experienced theworst of them, 150 miles from land, at half past 9 p.m. about the time we were running one at our houses. She is 94 days from England, and though she sailed after the "Royal Stuart" brings no later news from Europe. She has about 150 people for Auckland, and some half dozen for us; and will proceed on her way to her destination this day. We were anxiously looking for the "Nelson", which will wait at Auckland for the "W. Denny."

Rogan, as I have already stated, is here; and attempted the other day to resume the Hua survey. The natives had arranged to work, but they put him off for the fight, and he does not expect they will subside for a time. If you do not want him in another part, he might remain for a reasonable time, a charge on the natives; and when not employed, assist Carrington in the office, plan-making for Crown Grants.

We are so busy here in the office that I have lost my trip by the Coast. I did intend going one way or the other, but must put it off, I suppose. You, we imagine, to be well away from Wellington; as we have neither heard from, or of you.


sincerely yours (Signed)
W. Halse.
P.S. I have received from Auckland, 2 accounts approved; one for survey labour at Mokau (£21.12/-) and for Raniera's horse (£55) (Signed)
W.H.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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