Object #1017730 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

4 pages written 21 Nov 1868 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

21 November 1868

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

In my last letter to you I mentioned that I had no dreams bout you since your return from Wellington but let me tell you since that and before the Poverty Bay news came I had most extraordinary dreams about you and the Queen and a fine new ship which the Queen was connected with. I saw you also having something to to do about her as well as myself but I saw two old women coming on board her and looking very strange indeed. I was certain when I saw that there was some trouble and distraction close at hand and plenty of trouble of mind for

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English (MD)

you however I am in hopes that after all that with the help of providence you will in spite of the imbicile government you have to put up with you will still be able to settle the East Coast once more if they could onley leave you alone. Their is one thing I must tell you and that is not to trust yourself by any chance, any way near the How Hows as depend upon it they have a trap laid for you and it is for you to take every care.

I saw Skelicorn today and he is in a great way to get the accomodation house and as I know you are to much taken up with other matters interigoted [interrogated] him as to his views. His views are very good if he would carry them but he says he would shift his own house over to the other to make more room at his

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English (MD)

own expence and pay the same rent as the Allanach did, also that he wanted 10 or 15 acre padock just that bend of the land round where his shed is so as to keep his horses and cattle and that is very desirable. I asked him if he would fence it in. He said he could not but that he would pay 10 per cent on the money it would cost etc etc. He also said he would erect a small pound in the padock at his own expence which is very desirable, also as it would keep every thing clear of the station. Now my oppinion is the man is not the proper person for the house but I consider him much before the Allanach people and if wool scouring went on he would always be able to pay the rent and I think he is honest and that is what I fear the others were not and if you do not gave Mr Condie full power to distrain for what they

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English (MD)

owe you for rent, I believe over £60, you will never see it and they have some cattle and horses also some furnature which Skelicorn said he would take at valuation gaven for it if he got the place. I can only tell you that they do not deserve any leniency at your hands in any way for they have been two well dealt with and the rent you should have they I believe did not even gave you any intimation of there intention to leave which they should have given at least 2 or three months so that you ought to gave Condie all power to act as you cannot attend to it yourself and I am not able at preasant. I would be very glade to have an hour with you and was proposing to go down next week with Condie if I can manage at all I will do so as I have a good many things to talk about.


Always your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

21 November 1868

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

In my last letter to you I mentioned that I had no dreams bout you since your return from Wellington but let me tell you since that and before the Poverty Bay news came I had most extraordinary dreams about you and the Queen and a fine new ship which the Queen was connected with. I saw you also having something to to do about her as well as myself but I saw two old women coming on board her and looking very strange indeed. I was certain when I saw that there was some trouble and distraction close at hand and plenty of trouble of mind for you however I am in hopes that after all that with the help of providence you will in spite of the imbicile government you have to put up with you will still be able to settle the East Coast once more if they could onley leave you alone. Their is one thing I must tell you and that is not to trust yourself by any chance, any way near the How Hows as depend upon it they have a trap laid for you and it is for you to take every care.

I saw Skelicorn today and he is in a great way to get the accomodation house and as I know you are to much taken up with other matters interigoted [interrogated] him as to his views. His views are very good if he would carry them but he says he would shift his own house over to the other to make more room at his own expence and pay the same rent as the Allanach did, also that he wanted 10 or 15 acre padock just that bend of the land round where his shed is so as to keep his horses and cattle and that is very desirable. I asked him if he would fence it in. He said he could not but that he would pay 10 per cent on the money it would cost etc etc. He also said he would erect a small pound in the padock at his own expence which is very desirable, also as it would keep every thing clear of the station. Now my oppinion is the man is not the proper person for the house but I consider him much before the Allanach people and if wool scouring went on he would always be able to pay the rent and I think he is honest and that is what I fear the others were not and if you do not gave Mr Condie full power to distrain for what they owe you for rent, I believe over £60, you will never see it and they have some cattle and horses also some furnature which Skelicorn said he would take at valuation gaven for it if he got the place. I can only tell you that they do not deserve any leniency at your hands in any way for they have been two well dealt with and the rent you should have they I believe did not even gave you any intimation of there intention to leave which they should have given at least 2 or three months so that you ought to gave Condie all power to act as you cannot attend to it yourself and I am not able at preasant. I would be very glade to have an hour with you and was proposing to go down next week with Condie if I can manage at all I will do so as I have a good many things to talk about.


Always your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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