Object #1017678 from MS-Papers-0032-0534

3 pages written 13 Oct 1868 by James Crowe Richmond in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items). 33 letters written from Wellington, Turanganui, Ngatapa, Napier and Nelson, 1865-1870, & undated. Includes letter from Richmond to Ormond, Oct 1868; McLean to Richmond, 7 Jan 1869. Also piece-level inventory.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

of the present session in which you have felt it to be your duty to join our opponents and have attacked us with even more bitterness than they. This has made it impossible for us altogether to neglect the means of restoring that personal consideration for ourselves which your action has tended to damage. We are however still willing, for the sake of public interests to accept of your help and will give you your due share of the honors of success. Regard not for ourselves only but for the position of Government generally requires that we should not let our hottest opponent stand altogether between us and any part of the native population. We should have been well contented as before to waive in your favor our claims to any personal influence among the East Coast natives had you continued a supporter of our action and a defender of our characters. But native questions have unhappily been made again the turning point of a parliamentary battle, and we are obliged in support of the proper position of the Government of the country to assert ourselves somewhat. I say this with especial reference to the money payments to be made to the E. Coast natives, which must come direct from us or through some officer who has not been, is not, and is not likely to be the rival of the Government. In other respects

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English (ATL)

we shall not be niggardly in our acknowledgments of any success that may be achieved through your instrumentality.

As you mentioned the subject of money today, I thought it best after the experience we have had of the mischief of silence to speak out my exact mind which is also that of the Government on this matter.

I remain, my dear McLean,
Yours faithfully,
J. C. RICHMOND
His Honor D. McLean

English (ATL)

Wellington,

Oct. 13th, 1868



My dear McLean,

I dare say you will remember that in asking you in the session of 1867, to resume action to settle the East Coast I said that you should not be hindered or robbed of any particle of the credit and influence that might attend success in the difficult task, and that the only honor to which the Government aspired was that of having selected the right man and secured the accomplishment of the right ends. We should have liked to continue to act altogether on that principle but for the very peculiar circumstances of the present session in which you have felt it to be your duty to join our opponents and have attacked us with even more bitterness than they. This has made it impossible for us altogether to neglect the means of restoring that personal consideration for ourselves which your action has tended to damage. We are however still willing, for the sake of public interests to accept of your help and will give you your due share of the honors of success. Regard not for ourselves only but for the position of Government generally requires that we should not let our hottest opponent stand altogether between us and any part of the native population. We should have been well contented as before to waive in your favor our claims to any personal influence among the East Coast natives had you continued a supporter of our action and a defender of our characters. But native questions have unhappily been made again the turning point of a parliamentary battle, and we are obliged in support of the proper position of the Government of the country to assert ourselves somewhat. I say this with especial reference to the money payments to be made to the E. Coast natives, which must come direct from us or through some officer who has not been, is not, and is not likely to be the rival of the Government. In other respects we shall not be niggardly in our acknowledgments of any success that may be achieved through your instrumentality.

As you mentioned the subject of money today, I thought it best after the experience we have had of the mischief of silence to speak out my exact mind which is also that of the Government on this matter.

I remain, my dear McLean,
Yours faithfully,
J. C. RICHMOND
His Honor D. McLean

Part of:
Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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