Object #1017673 from MS-Papers-0032-0217

8 pages written 17 Oct 1870 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Auckland Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items). 59 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland & Waimate, 1861-1870. Includes letter to Hare Reweti (Charles Davis) from Manuhiri with explanatory note on verso from Louis Hetet, 1870.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Private. Auckland,

Octr. 17th. 1870.



My dear Mr. McLean,

I have only time to give you a very few lines by this mail. I returned on Friday night from Ohinemuri. Dr. Pollen was anxious about sitting of the Native Lands Court at Shortland at which the Ohinemuri cases are to be heard. It had been said and Puckey seemed to believe it that Te Hira and party would do something desperate with the Ngatikoi and the Doctor thought I had better go and satisfy myself

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English (ATL)

on the question. The tides were very unfavourable and we could not get off from Shortland till late in the evening - we arrived at Ohinemuri at 12 o'clock midnight - just to find that the principal men I wanted to see were away. Early in the morning the natives began to assemble and to lay seige to the whare where I slept. Paora Toki was the first manhe told me a long story of his delinquencies - how wrongly he had acted and that he was determined to turn over a new leaf and a great lot to the same effect. I could only reply that it would yet be seen whether his professions were sincere. While I was

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English (ATL)

talking to Paora Toki, Te Hira and party came up much to the astonishment of Rapata's people. He greeted me very cordially. Hohepa his spokesman in a very gentle way asked the purport of my visit - I told him that it had been reported that Te Hira would not put in an appearance nor allow any one to appear for him at the Land Court. I asked if it was true. This opened up the whole question and I was very much gratified with the moderate way in which they gave their opinion. They are as pakeke as ever about Ohinemuri, but are manifestly desirous of being at peace with us. Te Hira made quite a long speech

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English (ATL)

and candidly and temperately advanced his opinions. He has a great deal of good sense on his side, and from his point of view his statements are unanswerable at least most of them. He told me to pay no attention to some of their angry speeches amongst themselves - that they were merely "te ka o te mangai" and that was all. Hophepa says that he hopes that the day is not far distant when we shall be able to settle all our differences and establish a permanent peace, he said that he was speaking with advise. After I got what I wanted in the shape of information I took leave of them. They begged me to go

Page 5 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

and see them occasionally which I will most certainly do - especially when they gave me such encouragement.

The idea of Te Hira paying an unsolicited visit and to Rapatas Kainga too surprised every one and is looked upon as a great concession on his part. I think I had better go to the Native Land Court and watch the course of events.

I have arranged to go to the Waikato on the 3rd. of Novr. and if all is well I must go back to the Bay of Plenty in December.

Mr. Gill has returned and has nearly squared

Page 6 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

up everything. The Ohiwa men are unpaid and had the whole of the money I asked for been sent everything would have been settled up except the men who went with Kemp on his expeditions - that is as far as I am concerned but indeed it has been a most unpleasant task. I am glad it is over so far.

Would you kindly see that our Bay of Plenty and Auckland matters are passed on through the office and returned - there are a lot of things hanging fire some where.

With regard to roads I have directed Turner to

Page 7 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

lay the Road off in sections and make proper estimates and send them in for approval - then put the work out to contract - so as to give the pakehas a chance. But I know quite well they will not compete with Natives. Old Heale talks of making roads "by eye" but what a great expence this engineering is costing us. What with surveys and the covering parties which were necessary at the first stage of the proceedings the cost has been heavy. We must find some other means of getting work done cheaper.

Hamlin is very active and is making himself

Page 8 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

thoroughly acquainted with his District and people - my mind is greatly relieved in that quarter. I enclose his private notes - I have requested him to report officially as I do not like to make official use of private letters but which we are obliged sometimes to do failing proper reports. I wish I could get an hours chat with you. There are lots of matters which keep cropping up in ones mind, too numerous to commit to paper.


Yours very faithfully,
Hy. T. Clarke.

English (ATL)

Private. Auckland,

Octr. 17th. 1870.



My dear Mr. McLean,

I have only time to give you a very few lines by this mail. I returned on Friday night from Ohinemuri. Dr. Pollen was anxious about sitting of the Native Lands Court at Shortland at which the Ohinemuri cases are to be heard. It had been said and Puckey seemed to believe it that Te Hira and party would do something desperate with the Ngatikoi and the Doctor thought I had better go and satisfy myself on the question. The tides were very unfavourable and we could not get off from Shortland till late in the evening - we arrived at Ohinemuri at 12 o'clock midnight - just to find that the principal men I wanted to see were away. Early in the morning the natives began to assemble and to lay seige to the whare where I slept. Paora Toki was the first manhe told me a long story of his delinquencies - how wrongly he had acted and that he was determined to turn over a new leaf and a great lot to the same effect. I could only reply that it would yet be seen whether his professions were sincere. While I was talking to Paora Toki, Te Hira and party came up much to the astonishment of Rapata's people. He greeted me very cordially. Hohepa his spokesman in a very gentle way asked the purport of my visit - I told him that it had been reported that Te Hira would not put in an appearance nor allow any one to appear for him at the Land Court. I asked if it was true. This opened up the whole question and I was very much gratified with the moderate way in which they gave their opinion. They are as pakeke as ever about Ohinemuri, but are manifestly desirous of being at peace with us. Te Hira made quite a long speech and candidly and temperately advanced his opinions. He has a great deal of good sense on his side, and from his point of view his statements are unanswerable at least most of them. He told me to pay no attention to some of their angry speeches amongst themselves - that they were merely "te ka o te mangai" and that was all. Hophepa says that he hopes that the day is not far distant when we shall be able to settle all our differences and establish a permanent peace, he said that he was speaking with advise. After I got what I wanted in the shape of information I took leave of them. They begged me to go and see them occasionally which I will most certainly do - especially when they gave me such encouragement.

The idea of Te Hira paying an unsolicited visit and to Rapatas Kainga too surprised every one and is looked upon as a great concession on his part. I think I had better go to the Native Land Court and watch the course of events.

I have arranged to go to the Waikato on the 3rd. of Novr. and if all is well I must go back to the Bay of Plenty in December.

Mr. Gill has returned and has nearly squared up everything. The Ohiwa men are unpaid and had the whole of the money I asked for been sent everything would have been settled up except the men who went with Kemp on his expeditions - that is as far as I am concerned but indeed it has been a most unpleasant task. I am glad it is over so far.

Would you kindly see that our Bay of Plenty and Auckland matters are passed on through the office and returned - there are a lot of things hanging fire some where.

With regard to roads I have directed Turner to lay the Road off in sections and make proper estimates and send them in for approval - then put the work out to contract - so as to give the pakehas a chance. But I know quite well they will not compete with Natives. Old Heale talks of making roads "by eye" but what a great expence this engineering is costing us. What with surveys and the covering parties which were necessary at the first stage of the proceedings the cost has been heavy. We must find some other means of getting work done cheaper.

Hamlin is very active and is making himself thoroughly acquainted with his District and people - my mind is greatly relieved in that quarter. I enclose his private notes - I have requested him to report officially as I do not like to make official use of private letters but which we are obliged sometimes to do failing proper reports. I wish I could get an hours chat with you. There are lots of matters which keep cropping up in ones mind, too numerous to commit to paper.


Yours very faithfully,
Hy. T. Clarke.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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