Object #1017623 from MS-Papers-0032-0218

6 pages written 3 Oct 1871 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Tauranga to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0218 (56 digitised items). 50 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland and Waimate, 1871-1876

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Confidential. Tauranga

Octr. 3rd, 1871



My dear Mr. McLean

I expect the "Luna" will be in before the morning and although writing under difficulties I should not like her to return to Wellington without a line for you.

The Doctor has enjoined quiet for a day or two and in the absence of other light reading I have been amusing myself with the first four numbers of "Hansard" - I observe with pleasure that the house generally give you that praise which is your due in regard to your policy towards the natives - I have

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English (ATL)

always been of opinion that the Southern Members especially would support any Government which would relieve the Middle Island of their share of a heavy war expenditure. What a strange man Mr. Gillies is! but the course he is pursuing only makes it manifest by what he is actuated - There is also another gentleman who would distinguish himself if he could, a Mr. Collins, but he too shows the cloven hoof so unmistakenly that Stafford cannot feel himself much flattered by his following - In one of Mr. Gillies speeches he describes what he conceives to be the policy of the present Government by irreverently quoting a petition used in the Church of England Prayer Book "Give peace in our time etc." I have heard the same expression from one of our high officials in Auckland when talking of the Policy of present Government, and altho the expression is by them intended ironically I am sure every true colonist will most devoutly say "Amen" to the petition.

Time - Time is all we want. If the Govt. can draw the stream of immigration this way and fill up these broad wastes with an industrious population the Colony will go ahead. But if Mr. Gillies had his way - and endeavours to carry matters with a high hand ruin would be the inevitable consequence. It may be necessary to use extreme

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English (ATL)

measures but in my humble opinion it should only be done when you are sure you will succeed, and when operations can be carried on at comparatively little cost.

If Mr. G. should attempt to force either the telegraph or road through Ohinemuri the consequence would be something terrible - I have my own ideas about Ohinemuri and I believe by forcing our public works from this in that direction the natives will awaken to their true position -

There is another matter which has forced itself upon me. How is the Government going to obtain the land necessary to carry out its scheme of immigration

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English (ATL)

and Public works - The only manner in which I can see it could be done is by restraining the action of the Native Lands Court - The Court might enquire into title, but take away from it the power of granting Certificates within Certain Districts. I do not know whether such a plan has ever occurred to the Govt. but I see quite clearly that to make the scheme successful good land must be obtained for settlement. In this district there are thousands of acres - but unfortunately they are owned by absentees - there are thousands of acres available in spite of the "baleful shadow of myself and my natives" and there are thousands of

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English (ATL)

acres more that could be acquired without in any way hurtingthe natives, but on the contrary be of advantage to them by removing a fruitful source of quarrels -

I presume Mr. Halcombe is coming to make the enquiry ordered under Kellys motion I hope it is the case.

I hear the "Luna" is likely to bring telegraph poles to finish Katikati line. If so it will afford me an opportunity of squaring up matters in Auckland and go right atraight away to Wellington.

I do not know whether I shall be able to help

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English (ATL)

you very much, but the change I think will do me good. I do not know what is coming over me - I am afraid that I am becoming one of the most useless members of your department. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.

Excuse this hasty scrawl I am only just out of bed -


Believe me My dear Mr McLean Very faithfully yours
Hy. T. Clarke

English (ATL)

Confidential. Tauranga

Octr. 3rd, 1871



My dear Mr. McLean

I expect the "Luna" will be in before the morning and although writing under difficulties I should not like her to return to Wellington without a line for you.

The Doctor has enjoined quiet for a day or two and in the absence of other light reading I have been amusing myself with the first four numbers of "Hansard" - I observe with pleasure that the house generally give you that praise which is your due in regard to your policy towards the natives - I have always been of opinion that the Southern Members especially would support any Government which would relieve the Middle Island of their share of a heavy war expenditure. What a strange man Mr. Gillies is! but the course he is pursuing only makes it manifest by what he is actuated - There is also another gentleman who would distinguish himself if he could, a Mr. Collins, but he too shows the cloven hoof so unmistakenly that Stafford cannot feel himself much flattered by his following - In one of Mr. Gillies speeches he describes what he conceives to be the policy of the present Government by irreverently quoting a petition used in the Church of England Prayer Book "Give peace in our time etc." I have heard the same expression from one of our high officials in Auckland when talking of the Policy of present Government, and altho the expression is by them intended ironically I am sure every true colonist will most devoutly say "Amen" to the petition.

Time - Time is all we want. If the Govt. can draw the stream of immigration this way and fill up these broad wastes with an industrious population the Colony will go ahead. But if Mr. Gillies had his way - and endeavours to carry matters with a high hand ruin would be the inevitable consequence. It may be necessary to use extreme measures but in my humble opinion it should only be done when you are sure you will succeed, and when operations can be carried on at comparatively little cost.

If Mr. G. should attempt to force either the telegraph or road through Ohinemuri the consequence would be something terrible - I have my own ideas about Ohinemuri and I believe by forcing our public works from this in that direction the natives will awaken to their true position -

There is another matter which has forced itself upon me. How is the Government going to obtain the land necessary to carry out its scheme of immigration and Public works - The only manner in which I can see it could be done is by restraining the action of the Native Lands Court - The Court might enquire into title, but take away from it the power of granting Certificates within Certain Districts. I do not know whether such a plan has ever occurred to the Govt. but I see quite clearly that to make the scheme successful good land must be obtained for settlement. In this district there are thousands of acres - but unfortunately they are owned by absentees - there are thousands of acres available in spite of the "baleful shadow of myself and my natives" and there are thousands of acres more that could be acquired without in any way hurtingthe natives, but on the contrary be of advantage to them by removing a fruitful source of quarrels -

I presume Mr. Halcombe is coming to make the enquiry ordered under Kellys motion I hope it is the case.

I hear the "Luna" is likely to bring telegraph poles to finish Katikati line. If so it will afford me an opportunity of squaring up matters in Auckland and go right atraight away to Wellington.

I do not know whether I shall be able to help you very much, but the change I think will do me good. I do not know what is coming over me - I am afraid that I am becoming one of the most useless members of your department. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.

Excuse this hasty scrawl I am only just out of bed -


Believe me My dear Mr McLean Very faithfully yours
Hy. T. Clarke

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0218 (56 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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