Object #1017606 from MS-Papers-0032-0203

6 pages written 9 Mar 1845 by Moses Campbell in Wanganui to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Moses Campbell, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0203 (12 digitised items). 11 letters and a memorandum written from Wanganui, 1845-1860

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Wanganui.
9th March, 1845.


My Dear Sir,

I duly received your kind favour the 11th Feby. by the native boy, your sevt. when last here, also a basket of potatoes, for which I beg to return you many thanks. I should have answered your letter sooner but was unfortunately too late for the last post, nothing could afford me greater satisfaction than to be able to accept of your kind offer, to send for John, but in the present disturbed state of the country both Mrs.C. and myself are of opinion that it is better to defer sending him till things get more settled and till we have the pleasure of seeing you here again (which I hope may be soon) when we can have a farther talk over the matter, I expected you up here ten days ago to have accompanied Mr. Taylor up to the

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English (ATL)

Taupo Country for which place he started about ten days since by way of the Manawatu river -The Taupo's returned to this place about a fortnight since on their way home they only stayed the night to prevent them committing depredations the old chief obliged them to remain on the opposite side of the river and I did not hear of a single case of theft during their stay - I am sorry to say however that a serious case of robbery occurred here about ten days since Prettut the constable had got down by the cutter a large lump of green stone for traffic, some of the natives saw it landed and informed old Turoa who came over soon after accompanied by his son Paeuro and a party of natives some armed with muskets and demanded the stone which being not immediately given to them Paeuro broke open the door of the store with his foot and with the assistance of some of his people carried of the Green stone.

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English (ATL)

Wm. King accompanied by Mr. Taylor and myself proceeded to Paeuro's Pah but nothing we could say would induce him to give up the stone altho he professed his willingness to pay for it and so the matter rests for the present. With the above mentioned exception the Natives have conducted themselves extremely well for some time past nor is there any difficulty in getting on the land on the condition of quitting should payment not be made by the Company or the Government. I do not recollect ever to have seen Mr. Campbell but I knew old General Campbell Kinlambert very well, and his Cousin Dougald Campbell Dunnmarnockloch was for many years in the same regiment with me and one of my most intimate friends. I beg to be remembered to him when you see him. I am rejeune to hear that your crop has turned out better than you anticipated, I think we have a sufficiency of bread corn here far from

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English (ATL)

the consumption of the inhabitants but unfortunately we are without a mill, and all has to be ground by hand, in small steel mills. I am sorry to observe in the Wellington paper that the Settlers out side the block which the Governor purchased at Taranaki are at present in a very unpleasant situation, the Natives urging them to quit the land and the promised Compensation from the Government to enable them to do so not forthcoming, when shall our troubles cease. I fear they are but beginning. I fear that the Governor has cried Wolf too often that Sir George Gipps will not send assistance here till he hears from home, so that Hone Hiki is likely to go unpunished for some time. Can it be true that the Natives at Auckland have petioned the Governor to dismiss Mr. Clark Senior. You will see by the Wellington paper that our friend Forsaith comes in for it sweetly. Mrs. C. begs her best regards and believe me ever,


My Dear Sir,
Most sincerely yours,
M. Campbell.
Donald McLean, Esq.,
Native Protector.

English (ATL)

Wanganui.
9th March, 1845.


My Dear Sir,

I duly received your kind favour the 11th Feby. by the native boy, your sevt. when last here, also a basket of potatoes, for which I beg to return you many thanks. I should have answered your letter sooner but was unfortunately too late for the last post, nothing could afford me greater satisfaction than to be able to accept of your kind offer, to send for John, but in the present disturbed state of the country both Mrs.C. and myself are of opinion that it is better to defer sending him till things get more settled and till we have the pleasure of seeing you here again (which I hope may be soon) when we can have a farther talk over the matter, I expected you up here ten days ago to have accompanied Mr. Taylor up to the Taupo Country for which place he started about ten days since by way of the Manawatu river -The Taupo's returned to this place about a fortnight since on their way home they only stayed the night to prevent them committing depredations the old chief obliged them to remain on the opposite side of the river and I did not hear of a single case of theft during their stay - I am sorry to say however that a serious case of robbery occurred here about ten days since Prettut the constable had got down by the cutter a large lump of green stone for traffic, some of the natives saw it landed and informed old Turoa who came over soon after accompanied by his son Paeuro and a party of natives some armed with muskets and demanded the stone which being not immediately given to them Paeuro broke open the door of the store with his foot and with the assistance of some of his people carried of the Green stone. Wm. King accompanied by Mr. Taylor and myself proceeded to Paeuro's Pah but nothing we could say would induce him to give up the stone altho he professed his willingness to pay for it and so the matter rests for the present. With the above mentioned exception the Natives have conducted themselves extremely well for some time past nor is there any difficulty in getting on the land on the condition of quitting should payment not be made by the Company or the Government. I do not recollect ever to have seen Mr. Campbell but I knew old General Campbell Kinlambert very well, and his Cousin Dougald Campbell Dunnmarnockloch was for many years in the same regiment with me and one of my most intimate friends. I beg to be remembered to him when you see him. I am rejeune to hear that your crop has turned out better than you anticipated, I think we have a sufficiency of bread corn here far from the consumption of the inhabitants but unfortunately we are without a mill, and all has to be ground by hand, in small steel mills. I am sorry to observe in the Wellington paper that the Settlers out side the block which the Governor purchased at Taranaki are at present in a very unpleasant situation, the Natives urging them to quit the land and the promised Compensation from the Government to enable them to do so not forthcoming, when shall our troubles cease. I fear they are but beginning. I fear that the Governor has cried Wolf too often that Sir George Gipps will not send assistance here till he hears from home, so that Hone Hiki is likely to go unpunished for some time. Can it be true that the Natives at Auckland have petioned the Governor to dismiss Mr. Clark Senior. You will see by the Wellington paper that our friend Forsaith comes in for it sweetly. Mrs. C. begs her best regards and believe me ever,


My Dear Sir,
Most sincerely yours,
M. Campbell.
Donald McLean, Esq.,
Native Protector.

Part of:
Inward letters - Moses Campbell, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0203 (12 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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