Object #1017380 from MS-Papers-0032-0374

5 pages written 23 May 1846 by Henry King in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items). 71 letters written from Taranaki - Police Office, Brooklands & New Plymouth

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

N.P.
Friday 23rd. May /46.


My dear Maclean,

I was delighted at receiving yours of 6th. inst. particularly so, from our having great doubts as to whether you would have reached Wanganui before the tremendous weather set in, we had heard from a young man a shoemaker who stated that he left Wanganui on the Monday following the date of your arrival that no arrivals had taken place up to that time so therefore believed that you must have run for Kapiti or elsewhere for shelter the little ''Victory'' who left the day after you for Kawhia with Mrs. Skerrington Miss Bowen etc. has not been heard of since her departure great fears are entertained for her safety she having been out in the most severe gales we ever recollect. This was the little craft that came in when you were getting under sail she had been a fortnight from all Auckland and brought Mrs. Strong and family who left on Monday last for Waimate, no news came by her, Capt. King had a letter enclosed to him for the Governor all was quiet in that quarter there were no other letters we have not since heard from the North, but understand that

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English (ATL)

the "Tapu" is still on the road. I am pleased in telling you that all the family are well and desire their kindest regards. Capt. King is quite right again they have heard of the death of Mrs. K.'s Father this was tho' I think before you left. Dorset's lady has benefitted him with the birth of a daughter a great boon this.

Brown is alright at Moturoa Boats all fitted and ready for work one crew of Maories there has been no weather yet for whaling. Barret quite recovered and making preparations for a commencement. Old Bosworth is here with a broken arm thrown from a horse. All others known to you are about the same, the Maories well behaved only one trespass ease since you left that very trifling it is against old Betsy Cooks late servant to be decided on Monday next. Have not seen Campbell since you left have paid Mr. Reid £5 for you. Dorset settled with Jeffries - who with about 40 others are about starting for Auckland Mr. Bailie who came down in Victory is doing all he can to persuade people to leave for Auckland some have already gone many others to follow - he has become owner of the "Lady of the Lake" she is being repaired at the north, I fancy

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English (ATL)

he will make a mistake in ship owning - will you remind Mr. Taylor that he promised Capt. King a Ke-ne he is very anxious to get it and will feel obliged by your enquiring for it and bring it up with you as also to be careful in its conveyance it is to form a conspicuous place in the Museum at Plymouth - he also wishes you to make enquiries for the Chair that was sent down the Coast some time ago and to bring it up with you if you can procure Natives he will pay them. All are anxiously looking for your return more particularly those who are anxious to enrol themselves themselves under your Banner as the future Murat of N.P. you must not think of bringing any for the Service with you as these have plenty sent their names into me as candidates including - Halse, Law, 2 Nairns, Newshaven, Coad, Gray (who was 4 years in the Irish Constabulary) Baines beside many others well suited for the service - we do not expect the Natives from Waikato under a month or two, should they come during your absence I will attend to the hints sent me by you. Cooke is more quiet than he has been for some time, Mantle intends remaining until the Govr. has been here, he is a candidate for a Birth. His temper is fearful soured of late.

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English (ATL)

Watt is quite well I have not seen him since I received yours - he is down in spirits I heard his girl is dying fast of consumption. Flight is without complaint in fact we could not possibly be more quiet than we are saving brawls amongst ourselves the particulars of which I will endeavour to furnish you with and which you will be kind enough to read to Symonds as I fear I shall not have time to write him the Native is determined to leave this morning altho' raining and blowing tremenduously we have had a continuance of bad weather ever since you left, I eannot imagine a more reasonable complaint than that of the surveyors if you have had equally bad weather as ourselves it has been horrid and should think impossbible for you to get outwith bush work, I had great hopes that you would have been able to return as soon as the the appt. of the police est. would put a little money into circulation, and for other persons as well. I forgot to tell you that yesterday Blacks wife turned a little girl into the world both doing well. I believe Maclean this is all loose matter now for that of more importance and which affects one of our J.P.'s most seriously, Halse is here.

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English (ATL)

O. Carrington wishes you to enquire of Mr. Wilson whether he had received a letter from him. Carrington is very anxious to get a reply to it - perhaps you will name this to Mr. Wilson.

Now for the all important you must know that on Monday week last Chilman put his threat into execution of preferring publicly his charge against Mr. W. which he did, in the following terms. Charge.-

"Accusation of R. Chilman against J.T.W. of receiving comps. money, and appropriating it to his own uses which charge he had never refuted nor could he do so - Mr. W. remained silent up to the time of Mr. C.'s absenting himself." - after this accusation was made the whole of us remained silent waiting W.'s reply after a lapse of many minutes Mr. C, rose and took leave of the Club repeating as a reason that he could no longer remain a member so long as Mr. W. did - you may imagine this was a great blow to those who had been his supporters as they all express themselves disappointed, the consequence is that the whole of us have absented ourselves from the Bench and to convince you I copy the letter sent him after our J.P.'s meeting on Monday last:


H. K.

English (ATL)

N.P.
Friday 23rd. May /46.


My dear Maclean,

I was delighted at receiving yours of 6th. inst. particularly so, from our having great doubts as to whether you would have reached Wanganui before the tremendous weather set in, we had heard from a young man a shoemaker who stated that he left Wanganui on the Monday following the date of your arrival that no arrivals had taken place up to that time so therefore believed that you must have run for Kapiti or elsewhere for shelter the little ''Victory'' who left the day after you for Kawhia with Mrs. Skerrington Miss Bowen etc. has not been heard of since her departure great fears are entertained for her safety she having been out in the most severe gales we ever recollect. This was the little craft that came in when you were getting under sail she had been a fortnight from all Auckland and brought Mrs. Strong and family who left on Monday last for Waimate, no news came by her, Capt. King had a letter enclosed to him for the Governor all was quiet in that quarter there were no other letters we have not since heard from the North, but understand that the "Tapu" is still on the road. I am pleased in telling you that all the family are well and desire their kindest regards. Capt. King is quite right again they have heard of the death of Mrs. K.'s Father this was tho' I think before you left. Dorset's lady has benefitted him with the birth of a daughter a great boon this.

Brown is alright at Moturoa Boats all fitted and ready for work one crew of Maories there has been no weather yet for whaling. Barret quite recovered and making preparations for a commencement. Old Bosworth is here with a broken arm thrown from a horse. All others known to you are about the same, the Maories well behaved only one trespass ease since you left that very trifling it is against old Betsy Cooks late servant to be decided on Monday next. Have not seen Campbell since you left have paid Mr. Reid £5 for you. Dorset settled with Jeffries - who with about 40 others are about starting for Auckland Mr. Bailie who came down in Victory is doing all he can to persuade people to leave for Auckland some have already gone many others to follow - he has become owner of the "Lady of the Lake" she is being repaired at the north, I fancy he will make a mistake in ship owning - will you remind Mr. Taylor that he promised Capt. King a Ke-ne he is very anxious to get it and will feel obliged by your enquiring for it and bring it up with you as also to be careful in its conveyance it is to form a conspicuous place in the Museum at Plymouth - he also wishes you to make enquiries for the Chair that was sent down the Coast some time ago and to bring it up with you if you can procure Natives he will pay them. All are anxiously looking for your return more particularly those who are anxious to enrol themselves themselves under your Banner as the future Murat of N.P. you must not think of bringing any for the Service with you as these have plenty sent their names into me as candidates including - Halse, Law, 2 Nairns, Newshaven, Coad, Gray (who was 4 years in the Irish Constabulary) Baines beside many others well suited for the service - we do not expect the Natives from Waikato under a month or two, should they come during your absence I will attend to the hints sent me by you. Cooke is more quiet than he has been for some time, Mantle intends remaining until the Govr. has been here, he is a candidate for a Birth. His temper is fearful soured of late. Watt is quite well I have not seen him since I received yours - he is down in spirits I heard his girl is dying fast of consumption. Flight is without complaint in fact we could not possibly be more quiet than we are saving brawls amongst ourselves the particulars of which I will endeavour to furnish you with and which you will be kind enough to read to Symonds as I fear I shall not have time to write him the Native is determined to leave this morning altho' raining and blowing tremenduously we have had a continuance of bad weather ever since you left, I eannot imagine a more reasonable complaint than that of the surveyors if you have had equally bad weather as ourselves it has been horrid and should think impossbible for you to get outwith bush work, I had great hopes that you would have been able to return as soon as the the appt. of the police est. would put a little money into circulation, and for other persons as well. I forgot to tell you that yesterday Blacks wife turned a little girl into the world both doing well. I believe Maclean this is all loose matter now for that of more importance and which affects one of our J.P.'s most seriously, Halse is here. O. Carrington wishes you to enquire of Mr. Wilson whether he had received a letter from him. Carrington is very anxious to get a reply to it - perhaps you will name this to Mr. Wilson.

Now for the all important you must know that on Monday week last Chilman put his threat into execution of preferring publicly his charge against Mr. W. which he did, in the following terms. Charge.-

"Accusation of R. Chilman against J.T.W. of receiving comps. money, and appropriating it to his own uses which charge he had never refuted nor could he do so - Mr. W. remained silent up to the time of Mr. C.'s absenting himself." - after this accusation was made the whole of us remained silent waiting W.'s reply after a lapse of many minutes Mr. C, rose and took leave of the Club repeating as a reason that he could no longer remain a member so long as Mr. W. did - you may imagine this was a great blow to those who had been his supporters as they all express themselves disappointed, the consequence is that the whole of us have absented ourselves from the Bench and to convince you I copy the letter sent him after our J.P.'s meeting on Monday last:


H. K.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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