Object #1017217 from MS-Papers-0032-0217

4 pages written 1 Oct 1869 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Tauranga to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items). 59 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland & Waimate, 1861-1870. Includes letter to Hare Reweti (Charles Davis) from Manuhiri with explanatory note on verso from Louis Hetet, 1870.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

COPY. (PRIVATE.) Tauranga

October 1st. 1869.



My dear Mr. McLean,

Since I wrote to you last, I have been to Whakatane. I was invited to attend a Meeting there. The Ngatiawa, Ngatipukeko, Arawa, Ngatitai, and Ngatirangi were represented. Certain resolutions were passed which they will themselves forward to you.

Maihe Tikanga, who, as you will remember, always makes himself prominent on such occasions, and generally takes extreme views, proposed that all the natives from Tikerau to Kati Kati should be made soldiers; that this was the only way to put an nd to present difficulties. He stated - for the benefit of his hearers - that the Queen had sent a large army to the Country; but they did not, or could not finish their work. Millions of money had been thrown away for no good purpose, and although the Country was still in as bad a state as before, the Troops had been removed,

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English (ATL)

and the consequence was that those natives who had assisted us on many occasions, had to bear the brunt of it, and many tribes had in consequence suffered. He therefore propossed that they should all be made soldiers, and turned loose, so as to settle the question; that they should have no Pakeha tumuski; as on all occasions when they had had a Pakeha tumuaki, they had made a mess of it. And when they had fought and acted in their own way, they had been successful.

I suggested to the Meeting that they had better be enrolled as the Volunteers, and offer their services to the Government.

After about two hours' discussion, they threw Maihe's Resolution, and adopted my suggestion, and decided upon having a Pakeha tumuaki.

Another question was Tareha, and his represantation of the District. They did not see that he was doing any good, or that he took any interest in the welfare of the district, etc.

Wikimohi, a very sensible and intelligent man, a Chiof of the Tuhoniangi tribe, said that he could not see what benefit the Maori made were

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English (ATL)

to get from these native Members, pitted against sixty and more Pakehas, and the great disadvantage in not understanding the language. He proposed that there should be another gathering of all the Chiefs of the Island - a second Kohimarama. That that Meeting had produced very good effects, having confirmed many wavering Arawes, who had since been staunch friends to the Government.

As in regard to this, I would urge you to give it a thought. I know it would do good, and I have heard that Tamihana Te Rauparaha has sent Circular letters to all parts of the Island, proposing a General Meeting, and urging the collection of money for the purpose.

I have a sort of instinetive horror of these large gatherings of natives, unless the Government steps in, and takes the lead, as it were, in such matters. Much mischief may ensue, if they are left to their misguided judgement. Please to give this a thought. I will report this officially as soon as I get the Native Report of the proceedings.

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English (ATL)


I have had a deputation of the Hau Haus from Piako. They came to invite me to a Meeting at either Ngamanahu, or Hamiaki. But you will see a Report on the subject. I have little doubt that there is a great division amongst the King Party on the question of Te Kooti. Would it not be well to watch the movement closely, and see whether a favourable opportunity will not offer, of stepping in?

The Ngatierangi are very desirous to be employed in some way, and I should be very glad to do it. Hitherto they have been kept in a state of punishment for their past acts. Not having been employed, I am anxious to employ them on the roads, which are absolutely necessary for defensive purposes. As we are now, we are out off entirely from our out-settlements Te Waiwa and Otumoetai, except at low water.

I should like to have £500 to spend for this purpose. I will apply officially.

Excuse this hasty line. Lots of natives are waiting for me.


Yours very faithfully (Signed)
H. Clarke.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

COPY. (PRIVATE.) Tauranga

October 1st. 1869.



My dear Mr. McLean,

Since I wrote to you last, I have been to Whakatane. I was invited to attend a Meeting there. The Ngatiawa, Ngatipukeko, Arawa, Ngatitai, and Ngatirangi were represented. Certain resolutions were passed which they will themselves forward to you.

Maihe Tikanga, who, as you will remember, always makes himself prominent on such occasions, and generally takes extreme views, proposed that all the natives from Tikerau to Kati Kati should be made soldiers; that this was the only way to put an nd to present difficulties. He stated - for the benefit of his hearers - that the Queen had sent a large army to the Country; but they did not, or could not finish their work. Millions of money had been thrown away for no good purpose, and although the Country was still in as bad a state as before, the Troops had been removed, and the consequence was that those natives who had assisted us on many occasions, had to bear the brunt of it, and many tribes had in consequence suffered. He therefore propossed that they should all be made soldiers, and turned loose, so as to settle the question; that they should have no Pakeha tumuski; as on all occasions when they had had a Pakeha tumuaki, they had made a mess of it. And when they had fought and acted in their own way, they had been successful.

I suggested to the Meeting that they had better be enrolled as the Volunteers, and offer their services to the Government.

After about two hours' discussion, they threw Maihe's Resolution, and adopted my suggestion, and decided upon having a Pakeha tumuaki.

Another question was Tareha, and his represantation of the District. They did not see that he was doing any good, or that he took any interest in the welfare of the district, etc.

Wikimohi, a very sensible and intelligent man, a Chiof of the Tuhoniangi tribe, said that he could not see what benefit the Maori made were to get from these native Members, pitted against sixty and more Pakehas, and the great disadvantage in not understanding the language. He proposed that there should be another gathering of all the Chiefs of the Island - a second Kohimarama. That that Meeting had produced very good effects, having confirmed many wavering Arawes, who had since been staunch friends to the Government.

As in regard to this, I would urge you to give it a thought. I know it would do good, and I have heard that Tamihana Te Rauparaha has sent Circular letters to all parts of the Island, proposing a General Meeting, and urging the collection of money for the purpose.

I have a sort of instinetive horror of these large gatherings of natives, unless the Government steps in, and takes the lead, as it were, in such matters. Much mischief may ensue, if they are left to their misguided judgement. Please to give this a thought. I will report this officially as soon as I get the Native Report of the proceedings.

I have had a deputation of the Hau Haus from Piako. They came to invite me to a Meeting at either Ngamanahu, or Hamiaki. But you will see a Report on the subject. I have little doubt that there is a great division amongst the King Party on the question of Te Kooti. Would it not be well to watch the movement closely, and see whether a favourable opportunity will not offer, of stepping in?

The Ngatierangi are very desirous to be employed in some way, and I should be very glad to do it. Hitherto they have been kept in a state of punishment for their past acts. Not having been employed, I am anxious to employ them on the roads, which are absolutely necessary for defensive purposes. As we are now, we are out off entirely from our out-settlements Te Waiwa and Otumoetai, except at low water.

I should like to have £500 to spend for this purpose. I will apply officially.

Excuse this hasty line. Lots of natives are waiting for me.


Yours very faithfully (Signed)
H. Clarke.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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