Object #1016956 from MS-Papers-0032-0817

4 pages written 15 Jul 1862 by Archibald John McLean in Maraekakaho to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items). Letters written on board ship or from various ports, 1847-1858 prior to his arrival in New Zealand in mid-1858. From then on the letters are almost all written from Maraekakaho about station matters.

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

15 July 1862

Maraekakaho

My dear Donald

I wrote you by last mail but as I had no definite news about Nairn to let you know of I now write you again. I told you in my last that Alexander was among the natives. He was away for a week and he told me that the natives came to the conclution to send Nairn of[f]. Nairn several times wished to sell for £2000 all his stock and interest. Alick offered him £1100 but he did not agree to that 1300 wethers, 955 two tooth & 4 tooth ewes & 28 rams he says is the stock he has there and about 400 or 500 lambs. He was here yesterday and appeared very anxious to sell & I believe would have sold for less than the £2000 but poor Alick was soft with having had another bout of drink and he gave him his own terms of bill on the Union Bank at three and six month. I wished him to take due delivery of the sheep but he took Nairn's word for the number. I daresay they may be correct but I considered it a loose way of doing busness. However I believe Nairn is a very just man and I hope that they may be all correct. The clip from them ought to pay the rent. It should bring £500 and if the wethers can be sold after shearing for 16/ or 17/ shillings one thousand

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

pounds could be paid of so that I do not consider it a bad bargain after all. If Alick would only keep sober and attend to his duties things might go on well and money could be made. I have spoak to him very serious this time and so has his poor sister & my wife telling him he would bring himself to a very miserable end with it. I grieve to have to be writing you in this way about him but without something is done there is no knowing what the result may be and that he may bring ruin and disgrace on us all. He was for off today again but the effects of what he was taking last week has laid him prostrate. I do wish you were back again till things would be properly arranged. I think that the old boundaries will be enough [?] for us and that Condie should pay £200 or £300 for gaving him the detached block. I consider it little enough after all the trouble their was about getting it. That is Alick's own oppinion as well as mine. Condie would be a first rate neighbour and that would reduce our rent to £400. My own beliefs is that the old native boundaries will keep 30,000 sheep without the other block which is very bad to sheepheard. I do not take in your freehold in the keep of the 30,000 sheep as I firmly believe the native land will keep them as it improves. Nairn has built a wharrie on the place about a mile from our old wash pool which will be a good place for Malcomb to stay at their. He

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English (MD)

can do all that is wanted down their and any one of the others can look after this end. However I hope you will soon come down by the first opportunity. I am very sorry that the 'White Swan' is lost. It will be a very great loss to Napier but I hope they will soon get another on the route. I enclose you a copy of the agreement. I am going down tommorrow to have a look at the sheep and house and I will write you my oppinion by next mail. Douglas is quite happy since he got the other little fellow with him. He was like a little man carrying me rails for the fence on his shoulders today. He is very fond of work. We are all quite well and I hope Alick will soon be better. I did not like the way John when here buttered Alick up. John is full of deep designing schemes however there is no use in saying any more till you come down. I did not like the way he told me about buying the watch in Alick's name and gaving it to his wife and many other little matters. However he might let other matters allone he said over and that the place should be as much Alick's as yours as he made the

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

station. In my oppinion you have been to easy all allong. There is no doubt if poor Alick would take care of himself but he could do well enough but he has high nothing enough in his head without putting more in. At all events I wish you for your own interest as well as mine as you are the only one I have to depend upon and our poor sisters to have things properly arranged on. From what I could learn you may be brought in for more than you think for I do not think that poor Alick has half the design in him as John. At the same time I always like people to be oppen in their dealings for I do not see why honest men should have secrets. No one that is doing what is right need have. I will say no more hoping this will find you quite well.


Ever your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

15 July 1862

Maraekakaho

My dear Donald

I wrote you by last mail but as I had no definite news about Nairn to let you know of I now write you again. I told you in my last that Alexander was among the natives. He was away for a week and he told me that the natives came to the conclution to send Nairn of[f]. Nairn several times wished to sell for £2000 all his stock and interest. Alick offered him £1100 but he did not agree to that 1300 wethers, 955 two tooth & 4 tooth ewes & 28 rams he says is the stock he has there and about 400 or 500 lambs. He was here yesterday and appeared very anxious to sell & I believe would have sold for less than the £2000 but poor Alick was soft with having had another bout of drink and he gave him his own terms of bill on the Union Bank at three and six month. I wished him to take due delivery of the sheep but he took Nairn's word for the number. I daresay they may be correct but I considered it a loose way of doing busness. However I believe Nairn is a very just man and I hope that they may be all correct. The clip from them ought to pay the rent. It should bring £500 and if the wethers can be sold after shearing for 16/ or 17/ shillings one thousand pounds could be paid of so that I do not consider it a bad bargain after all. If Alick would only keep sober and attend to his duties things might go on well and money could be made. I have spoak to him very serious this time and so has his poor sister & my wife telling him he would bring himself to a very miserable end with it. I grieve to have to be writing you in this way about him but without something is done there is no knowing what the result may be and that he may bring ruin and disgrace on us all. He was for off today again but the effects of what he was taking last week has laid him prostrate. I do wish you were back again till things would be properly arranged. I think that the old boundaries will be enough [?] for us and that Condie should pay £200 or £300 for gaving him the detached block. I consider it little enough after all the trouble their was about getting it. That is Alick's own oppinion as well as mine. Condie would be a first rate neighbour and that would reduce our rent to £400. My own beliefs is that the old native boundaries will keep 30,000 sheep without the other block which is very bad to sheepheard. I do not take in your freehold in the keep of the 30,000 sheep as I firmly believe the native land will keep them as it improves. Nairn has built a wharrie on the place about a mile from our old wash pool which will be a good place for Malcomb to stay at their. He can do all that is wanted down their and any one of the others can look after this end. However I hope you will soon come down by the first opportunity. I am very sorry that the 'White Swan' is lost. It will be a very great loss to Napier but I hope they will soon get another on the route. I enclose you a copy of the agreement. I am going down tommorrow to have a look at the sheep and house and I will write you my oppinion by next mail. Douglas is quite happy since he got the other little fellow with him. He was like a little man carrying me rails for the fence on his shoulders today. He is very fond of work. We are all quite well and I hope Alick will soon be better. I did not like the way John when here buttered Alick up. John is full of deep designing schemes however there is no use in saying any more till you come down. I did not like the way he told me about buying the watch in Alick's name and gaving it to his wife and many other little matters. However he might let other matters allone he said over and that the place should be as much Alick's as yours as he made the station. In my oppinion you have been to easy all allong. There is no doubt if poor Alick would take care of himself but he could do well enough but he has high nothing enough in his head without putting more in. At all events I wish you for your own interest as well as mine as you are the only one I have to depend upon and our poor sisters to have things properly arranged on. From what I could learn you may be brought in for more than you think for I do not think that poor Alick has half the design in him as John. At the same time I always like people to be oppen in their dealings for I do not see why honest men should have secrets. No one that is doing what is right need have. I will say no more hoping this will find you quite well.


Ever your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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