Object #1016867 from MS-Papers-0032-0374

3 pages written 18 Dec 1856 by Henry King in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items). 71 letters written from Taranaki - Police Office, Brooklands & New Plymouth

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Brooklands,
Dec. 18, 1856.


Dear McLean,

I have been a letter in your debt for a considerable time, but have partly delayed answering it that I might get Willy to act as my amanuensis, as my cramped fingers give me so much trouble in writing. All the excitement which you mention as caused by the meeting of the assembly must have subsided by this time, to be probably renewed again next session. You have of course heard our political news, and that Cutfield has consented to be put in nomination for Superintendent --- R. Brown, the old Doctor and Norris are at the bottom of it.

No better time than the present could have been chosen for the dissolution of the council and consequent re-election of Superintendent

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English (ATL)

as Charles Brown and his advisers, Chilman and T. King have thoroughly disgusted the people by their ill-advised proceedings in attempting to turn out Flight and in selling the land of those absentees whose rates have not been paid, with their addition of 40 per cent. This last is, I think, a most iniquitous and illegal measure which could not have been put in practice in the old country.

I hope you will lose no opportunity of reminding the Governor of our want of land and of the necessity of taking such steps as may lead to the acquisition of fresh land by fostering and keeping alive the disposition to sell amongst the Natives, and allowing you to come here from time to time for that purpose. No sub. will serve our turn, they do worse than nothing and leave matters more complicated than they find them.

Farming affairs are at a very low ebb; the loss of anymarket for the potato crop last year which was grown to a great extent has half ruined several small farmers, in fact there is no sure sale for any produce, and still greater uncertainty as to getting the money afterwards.

Mr. Govet is going to England to see his father who is getting an old man and has expressed a wish to see him before his death. He takes his family with him and I believe a Mr. Tally of Nelson is expected to supply his place during his absence.

My secretary has left me to conclude the letter and to request your acceptance of the best wishes of Mrs. King and the young people with yours faithfully,


Henry King.

English (ATL)

Brooklands,
Dec. 18, 1856.


Dear McLean,

I have been a letter in your debt for a considerable time, but have partly delayed answering it that I might get Willy to act as my amanuensis, as my cramped fingers give me so much trouble in writing. All the excitement which you mention as caused by the meeting of the assembly must have subsided by this time, to be probably renewed again next session. You have of course heard our political news, and that Cutfield has consented to be put in nomination for Superintendent --- R. Brown, the old Doctor and Norris are at the bottom of it.

No better time than the present could have been chosen for the dissolution of the council and consequent re-election of Superintendent as Charles Brown and his advisers, Chilman and T. King have thoroughly disgusted the people by their ill-advised proceedings in attempting to turn out Flight and in selling the land of those absentees whose rates have not been paid, with their addition of 40 per cent. This last is, I think, a most iniquitous and illegal measure which could not have been put in practice in the old country.

I hope you will lose no opportunity of reminding the Governor of our want of land and of the necessity of taking such steps as may lead to the acquisition of fresh land by fostering and keeping alive the disposition to sell amongst the Natives, and allowing you to come here from time to time for that purpose. No sub. will serve our turn, they do worse than nothing and leave matters more complicated than they find them.

Farming affairs are at a very low ebb; the loss of anymarket for the potato crop last year which was grown to a great extent has half ruined several small farmers, in fact there is no sure sale for any produce, and still greater uncertainty as to getting the money afterwards.

Mr. Govet is going to England to see his father who is getting an old man and has expressed a wish to see him before his death. He takes his family with him and I believe a Mr. Tally of Nelson is expected to supply his place during his absence.

My secretary has left me to conclude the letter and to request your acceptance of the best wishes of Mrs. King and the young people with yours faithfully,


Henry King.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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