Object #1016796 from MS-Papers-0032-0001

8 pages written 2 Aug 1844 by George Clarke in Auckland Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Protector of Aborigines - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0001 (21 digitised items). Memos and correspondence with George Clarke, the Chief Protector of Aborigines, including draft reports by McLean on his meetings with Maori relating to disputes and negotiations over land.Also includes translation of a letter (1844) from Te Wherowhero to the Taranaki chiefs urging them not to follow Te Rauparaha's example of confrontation refering to the Wairau conflict (1839) and notes of a meeting between Ngamotu Maori and McLean, 27 Sep 1844.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Protectors Office,
Auckland,
August 2nd, 1844.


Sir,

In accordance with the intimation contained in my letter of the 16th Inst. I have the honor to call your attention to the following principles to be observed as a rule for your general guidance towards the efficient discharge of the duties devolving upon you.

First. You will consider the varied exercise of your official duties as connected with and based upon the primary intention of H. M. Government in the formation of the Department with which you are connected, viz. to watch over the interest, to protect the persons and property, and advance the social and moral improvement of Her Majesty's Aboriginal Subjects.

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English (ATL)


2ndly. That in order to the more efficient accomplishment of these duties, His Excellency has been pleased to divide the Colony and Districts. The Western will be your sphere of action, every inhabited portion of which you will consider it your duty to visit (except in cases where local circumstances may render it impossible) at least once a Year.

3rdly. In all Native cases i.e. in disputes and quarrels amongst themselves endeavour in conjunction with the Chiefs as far as possible to settle them in accordance with their own Customs by compensation their more serious disagreements may be settled in accordance with the Native exemption Ordinance in a Superior Court there are not likely to be many cases in which reference thereto may be necessary.

4thly. In cases of continued and determined

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English (ATL)

obstinacy, compulsory measures must be gradually but carefully introduced in accordance with the Ordinance, the assistance of the Chiefs must at all times be resorted to.

5thly. To prevent sudden ebullitions of feeling, so apt to lead the Natives to the Commission of Deeds which their better judgements would disavow, impress upon their minds the necessity of referring all their grievances to you, and encourage them at all times to send for you, and as their own Customs have from time immemorial taken cognizance of offences, and considered them grave which our Courts hardly notice, and as these Customs tend to preserve Society in a healthy state they will therefore deserve to be treated gravely by you.

6thly. Impress on their minds the benefits arising from the establishment of a well organized Government amongst

Page 4 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

them, let them see the practical results of it.

7thly. By your own elevated character elevate theirs, never descend to their standard but raise them to yours.

8thly. Let them distinctly understand that wars and the practice of Cannibalism must cease, that if persisted in, such conduct will eventually be visited with severe punishment.

9thly. Assure them that Protection will invariably be afforded to their property and relieve their minds from any apprehensions that may arise on the increase of a European population by reiterating the assurances of the Late Governor Captn. Hobson, that in no case should they be deprived of their estates or cultivations, and that no Lands shall be taken possession of but those they have or may willingly alienate.

10thly. Make yourself acquainted with

Page 5 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

every passing event in the District, note and inform the Head of the Department, and encourage the Natives to write on all subjects.

11th. Be careful in the reception of Native reports of each other, where interest or animosity actuates them, neither credit all they say nor discredit everything.

12th. Make great allowance for Both Europeans and Natives in their little disputes owing to their ignorance of each others language, but always bear in mind that it is characteristic for Europeans to tyrannize and assume a superiority especially where there is a difference of shade in the skin, and that he has an advantage in always being able to represent the case in his own language.

An honourable union between Natives and Europeans should be encouraged.

13th. Transmit to me as Head of the

Page 6 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Department your half yearly report embodying in it statistical accounts of the Natives and Country more especially pointing out the increase or diminution of the Aboriginal population, its causes whether local or general, and its antidote, in addition to such report you will keep up a regular correspondence with the Department informing me of every important event in reference to both the Natives and Europeans, as far as the Government and the former are likely to be interested by them for which purpose you will be supplied with stationary and books in which you will be particularly careful to preserve a register of all documents you may receive, together with an accurate copy of all letters you may transmit.

I will embrace the earliest opportunity after the return of His Excellency the Governor of giving you special

Page 7 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

instructions relative to the Choice of Native reserves in Town and Country Sections in and about New Plymouth.


I have the honor to be, Sir,
Your most Obt, Servant,
George Clarke,

Chief Protector of Aborigines.

English (ATL)

Protectors Office,
Auckland,
August 2nd, 1844.


Sir,

In accordance with the intimation contained in my letter of the 16th Inst. I have the honor to call your attention to the following principles to be observed as a rule for your general guidance towards the efficient discharge of the duties devolving upon you.

First. You will consider the varied exercise of your official duties as connected with and based upon the primary intention of H. M. Government in the formation of the Department with which you are connected, viz. to watch over the interest, to protect the persons and property, and advance the social and moral improvement of Her Majesty's Aboriginal Subjects.

2ndly. That in order to the more efficient accomplishment of these duties, His Excellency has been pleased to divide the Colony and Districts. The Western will be your sphere of action, every inhabited portion of which you will consider it your duty to visit (except in cases where local circumstances may render it impossible) at least once a Year.

3rdly. In all Native cases i.e. in disputes and quarrels amongst themselves endeavour in conjunction with the Chiefs as far as possible to settle them in accordance with their own Customs by compensation their more serious disagreements may be settled in accordance with the Native exemption Ordinance in a Superior Court there are not likely to be many cases in which reference thereto may be necessary.

4thly. In cases of continued and determined obstinacy, compulsory measures must be gradually but carefully introduced in accordance with the Ordinance, the assistance of the Chiefs must at all times be resorted to.

5thly. To prevent sudden ebullitions of feeling, so apt to lead the Natives to the Commission of Deeds which their better judgements would disavow, impress upon their minds the necessity of referring all their grievances to you, and encourage them at all times to send for you, and as their own Customs have from time immemorial taken cognizance of offences, and considered them grave which our Courts hardly notice, and as these Customs tend to preserve Society in a healthy state they will therefore deserve to be treated gravely by you.

6thly. Impress on their minds the benefits arising from the establishment of a well organized Government amongst them, let them see the practical results of it.

7thly. By your own elevated character elevate theirs, never descend to their standard but raise them to yours.

8thly. Let them distinctly understand that wars and the practice of Cannibalism must cease, that if persisted in, such conduct will eventually be visited with severe punishment.

9thly. Assure them that Protection will invariably be afforded to their property and relieve their minds from any apprehensions that may arise on the increase of a European population by reiterating the assurances of the Late Governor Captn. Hobson, that in no case should they be deprived of their estates or cultivations, and that no Lands shall be taken possession of but those they have or may willingly alienate.

10thly. Make yourself acquainted with every passing event in the District, note and inform the Head of the Department, and encourage the Natives to write on all subjects.

11th. Be careful in the reception of Native reports of each other, where interest or animosity actuates them, neither credit all they say nor discredit everything.

12th. Make great allowance for Both Europeans and Natives in their little disputes owing to their ignorance of each others language, but always bear in mind that it is characteristic for Europeans to tyrannize and assume a superiority especially where there is a difference of shade in the skin, and that he has an advantage in always being able to represent the case in his own language.

An honourable union between Natives and Europeans should be encouraged.

13th. Transmit to me as Head of the Department your half yearly report embodying in it statistical accounts of the Natives and Country more especially pointing out the increase or diminution of the Aboriginal population, its causes whether local or general, and its antidote, in addition to such report you will keep up a regular correspondence with the Department informing me of every important event in reference to both the Natives and Europeans, as far as the Government and the former are likely to be interested by them for which purpose you will be supplied with stationary and books in which you will be particularly careful to preserve a register of all documents you may receive, together with an accurate copy of all letters you may transmit.

I will embrace the earliest opportunity after the return of His Excellency the Governor of giving you special instructions relative to the Choice of Native reserves in Town and Country Sections in and about New Plymouth.


I have the honor to be, Sir,
Your most Obt, Servant,
George Clarke,

Chief Protector of Aborigines.

Part of:
Protector of Aborigines - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0001 (21 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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