Object #1016555 from MS-Papers-0032-0828

4 pages written 14 Aug 1852 by Sir Donald McLean to Susan Douglas McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items). The letters from Donald are written from Porirua Barracks, Otaki, Rangitikei, Waikanae, Wanganui and Taranaki. Susan's letters are addressed from Dalmuir Hill (her parent's home) and Wellington Terrace. Many letters are undated and were written prior to their marriage in Aug 1851. Includes correspondence between Susan McLean and her mother Susan Strang (2 letters, undated); one letter from Helen Anne Wilson to Mrs McLean, 30 August 1852

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


August 14 1852


My own Douglas

This is Saturday night and you can scarcely conceive how dull I feel without you and how often I think of you. I have been confined to the house all day sorting letters, burning old useless papers, talking to natives and as 11 o'clock strikes I am just conveying my love to you which is ever as constant and durable as the sun that shines over us. The confinement and damp weather has given me a slight cold so my attendant has boiled a kettleful of water and placed a tub in my bedroom that I may bathe

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English (MD)

in, and [crossed out] tomorrow I expect to rise as happy, healthy and cheerful as the lark, or the koromoko that represents that bird in this country. I have no news for you puss excepting that I shall endeavour to leave here about the end of August for Wellington.

I spend every Sunday after church till 8pm with the Wilson's. The Taranaki people go to bed generally at 10 and rise at 7. They are much more regular than at Wellington so much so indeed that the bad habits you have encouraged me in

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English (MD)

has more than once nearly deprived me of my 8 o'clock breakfast, my half past dinner I can manage and 6 o'clock tea, no supper, no wine excepting on Saturday night when I indulge in one or two glasses and a few almonds and raisins. The weather has broken although I expect tomorrow will be a fine day. Every Sunday here is remarked as being fine compared with week days. My work is going on favorably and I am most industrious. The word industry reminds me of poor Mama who used to think from the time I spent with you that I must have had little to do. She is now retired from all the perplexing cares of this world and I trust my pussy

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English (MD)

that you may never do anything that she would object to. Remember the faithful counsel she has often given you and may the reflection of her departed spirit on your mind ever guard you from all evil.

I am ever my own Douglas you affectionate and devoted husband


Donald McLean

English (MD)


August 14 1852


My own Douglas

This is Saturday night and you can scarcely conceive how dull I feel without you and how often I think of you. I have been confined to the house all day sorting letters, burning old useless papers, talking to natives and as 11 o'clock strikes I am just conveying my love to you which is ever as constant and durable as the sun that shines over us. The confinement and damp weather has given me a slight cold so my attendant has boiled a kettleful of water and placed a tub in my bedroom that I may bathe in, and [crossed out] tomorrow I expect to rise as happy, healthy and cheerful as the lark, or the koromoko that represents that bird in this country. I have no news for you puss excepting that I shall endeavour to leave here about the end of August for Wellington.

I spend every Sunday after church till 8pm with the Wilson's. The Taranaki people go to bed generally at 10 and rise at 7. They are much more regular than at Wellington so much so indeed that the bad habits you have encouraged me in has more than once nearly deprived me of my 8 o'clock breakfast, my half past dinner I can manage and 6 o'clock tea, no supper, no wine excepting on Saturday night when I indulge in one or two glasses and a few almonds and raisins. The weather has broken although I expect tomorrow will be a fine day. Every Sunday here is remarked as being fine compared with week days. My work is going on favorably and I am most industrious. The word industry reminds me of poor Mama who used to think from the time I spent with you that I must have had little to do. She is now retired from all the perplexing cares of this world and I trust my pussy that you may never do anything that she would object to. Remember the faithful counsel she has often given you and may the reflection of her departed spirit on your mind ever guard you from all evil.

I am ever my own Douglas you affectionate and devoted husband


Donald McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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