Object #1016516 from MS-Papers-0032-0003

8 pages written 21 Mar 1849 by Sir Donald McLean in Rangitikei District to Wellington

From: Native Land Purchase Commissioner - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0003 (57 digitised items). Contains papers dealing with the purchase of Maori land; in particular, there are official papers about `Old Land Claims' (ie pre Treaty of Waitangi); there is also extensive correspondence about the purchase of land in the Rangitikei area from Ngati Apa, and a related dispute about ownership between Ngati Apa and Ngati Raukawa; there is also a letter from Henry Tiffin outlining the concerns of Wairarapa Maori about an invasion by Ngati Toa Also includes translation of a letter by the Ngati Toa outlining the boundaries of land ceded to the Crown in 1847.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Rangitikei
21st. March 1849.


Sir,

Referring to our late Meeting of natives held at this river, and subsequent proceedings connected with the contemplated purchase of the Rangitikei district, I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of His Excellency, the Lieut. Governor, that the Chiefs Rauparaha and Rangihaeata did not come further than Manawatu with the rest of the natives who attended the meeting.

Rauparaha

Page 2 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

stated that he was unable to travel as far, assigning as a reason, that he was seized with deafness and cold, on his journey from Otaki, and that his sons, Thompson, Martiu, Hakaria, and Taratoa, the Chief of Manawatu, were authorised and deputed by the elder Chiefs to act for them in their absence; it being unanimously agreed that the boundary of the land to be sold by the Ngatiapa tribe should be the Rangitikei river

Rangihaeata, who had been for some considerable time, preparing large quantities of food for the Ngatiapas and other natives who were invited by him to the meeting, was evidently calcuating on their co-operation in opposing the right of the Ngatiapas to sell any land South of the Wanganui river. This Chief had also been led to expect that

Page 3 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

that the Ngatiraukawas of Otaki and Manawatu would unite with him in opposing the sale of land, as several influential members of the above tribe solicited Rangihaeata's interference in preventing the Ngatiapa sale, and requested him and his followers to sign a document embodying their determination to retain possession of all their lands.

This disposition was generally and strongly manifested by the natives, when I commenced the present negotiations.

In the meantime, some of the Ngatiapas were secretly encouraging the Ngatiraukawas to hold the Rangitikei country, but they were apparently averse to making any open declaration at a meeting to this effect; and eventually yielded their opposition, objecting to accompany Rangihaeata to Rangitikei; and Rawiri

Page 4 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Puaha, a Chief of that tribe, stated to me that their reason for not going to Rangitikei was that they had no pretension of a claim to that district.

The Ngatitoas, a few of the Ngatiawa Chiefs, with Te Rauparaha and Rangihaeata, then proceeded to Taita, a village on the Manawatu river, where a feast was prepared for them.

The Ngatiraukawas accompanied me to Rangitikei; where, after some discussion, it was publicly and unanimously admitted that the Ngatiapas had a perfect right to sell the North banks of the Rangitikei; and that they should not distrust any Europeans who should settle there. But although they at the same time acknowledged the right of the Ngatiapas to a portion of the South bank of the river, they protested

Page 5 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

against its being occupied by Europeans; and stated that any attempt to do so would be considered by them as equivalent to a declaration of war on the part of the Government, with their tribe.

I took notes of the different speeches at the Meeting, which I shall have the honour of transmitting with my general report on this purchase.

I should observe that Rangihaeata appeared disappointed at finding that the natives generally did not support him more earnestly in opposing the sale of land; and his speech, delivered in my presence, to the natives assembled at Manawatu, and partly addressed to myself, was remarked on

Page 6 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

by the natives as being a more pacific one than he is generally in the habit of making. The only expressions used by him which I considered unfavourable, were insinuations that he yet relied on being better supported by a less vacillating people than his own tribe; and a remark that he would annoy the Ngatiapas, after they received payment for their land. This latter portion of his speech was after repeated by a Chief of Otaki, named Kingi Hori te Puke, and replied to by Te Ahu Karamu of Ohau; who said he would take no part in any such proceedings.

I am, at present, unable to detail further particulars, as the mail carrier has arrived, and I am preparing to start to Turakina, having marked

Page 7 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

off the Parewanui Reserve, including the village of that name, on the North bank of this river. I therefore beg to state that I expect to be able, within ten days of the present date, to define all necessary reserves, such as the Pahs and cultivations, in the occupation of the natives; and explore some portion of the interior, so as to form an approximate idea of the extent, quality, and general appearance of the country, to enable me to transmit for His Excellency's consideration and approval, an estimate of the amount that will be required to pay to the natives in annual instalments, to complete the purchase.

The services of an experienced and active surveyor, to accompany me to the interior, are very necessary.

The

Page 8 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

sum which I propose to pay to the natives, subject to His Excellency's approval, as a first instalment for their land, is One Thousand Pounds (£1000) in silver; which amount I should wish to be placed at my disposal at Wanganui, with as little delay as possible, as the Ngatiapas prefer going there instead of Wellington, to receive their money.

I have the honour to remain


Sir,
Your most obdt. humble servant (Signed)
Donald McLean.
Inspector of Police. P.S. Requisition for I quire Elephant paper, for mapping, enclosed; and for 3 skins of parchment. To:- The Honourable The Colonial Secretary Wellington.

Mr. Kalham informed me that the N.Z. Company had engaged Mr. Park, as knowing the country Mr. McLean is purchasing. I have not yet received official notice of it; but however Mr. K. promised to send it immediately.

(Signed) A. Domett, March 23rd. 1849.

English (ATL)

Rangitikei
21st. March 1849.


Sir,

Referring to our late Meeting of natives held at this river, and subsequent proceedings connected with the contemplated purchase of the Rangitikei district, I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of His Excellency, the Lieut. Governor, that the Chiefs Rauparaha and Rangihaeata did not come further than Manawatu with the rest of the natives who attended the meeting.

Rauparaha stated that he was unable to travel as far, assigning as a reason, that he was seized with deafness and cold, on his journey from Otaki, and that his sons, Thompson, Martiu, Hakaria, and Taratoa, the Chief of Manawatu, were authorised and deputed by the elder Chiefs to act for them in their absence; it being unanimously agreed that the boundary of the land to be sold by the Ngatiapa tribe should be the Rangitikei river

Rangihaeata, who had been for some considerable time, preparing large quantities of food for the Ngatiapas and other natives who were invited by him to the meeting, was evidently calcuating on their co-operation in opposing the right of the Ngatiapas to sell any land South of the Wanganui river. This Chief had also been led to expect that that the Ngatiraukawas of Otaki and Manawatu would unite with him in opposing the sale of land, as several influential members of the above tribe solicited Rangihaeata's interference in preventing the Ngatiapa sale, and requested him and his followers to sign a document embodying their determination to retain possession of all their lands.

This disposition was generally and strongly manifested by the natives, when I commenced the present negotiations.

In the meantime, some of the Ngatiapas were secretly encouraging the Ngatiraukawas to hold the Rangitikei country, but they were apparently averse to making any open declaration at a meeting to this effect; and eventually yielded their opposition, objecting to accompany Rangihaeata to Rangitikei; and Rawiri Puaha, a Chief of that tribe, stated to me that their reason for not going to Rangitikei was that they had no pretension of a claim to that district.

The Ngatitoas, a few of the Ngatiawa Chiefs, with Te Rauparaha and Rangihaeata, then proceeded to Taita, a village on the Manawatu river, where a feast was prepared for them.

The Ngatiraukawas accompanied me to Rangitikei; where, after some discussion, it was publicly and unanimously admitted that the Ngatiapas had a perfect right to sell the North banks of the Rangitikei; and that they should not distrust any Europeans who should settle there. But although they at the same time acknowledged the right of the Ngatiapas to a portion of the South bank of the river, they protested against its being occupied by Europeans; and stated that any attempt to do so would be considered by them as equivalent to a declaration of war on the part of the Government, with their tribe.

I took notes of the different speeches at the Meeting, which I shall have the honour of transmitting with my general report on this purchase.

I should observe that Rangihaeata appeared disappointed at finding that the natives generally did not support him more earnestly in opposing the sale of land; and his speech, delivered in my presence, to the natives assembled at Manawatu, and partly addressed to myself, was remarked on by the natives as being a more pacific one than he is generally in the habit of making. The only expressions used by him which I considered unfavourable, were insinuations that he yet relied on being better supported by a less vacillating people than his own tribe; and a remark that he would annoy the Ngatiapas, after they received payment for their land. This latter portion of his speech was after repeated by a Chief of Otaki, named Kingi Hori te Puke, and replied to by Te Ahu Karamu of Ohau; who said he would take no part in any such proceedings.

I am, at present, unable to detail further particulars, as the mail carrier has arrived, and I am preparing to start to Turakina, having marked off the Parewanui Reserve, including the village of that name, on the North bank of this river. I therefore beg to state that I expect to be able, within ten days of the present date, to define all necessary reserves, such as the Pahs and cultivations, in the occupation of the natives; and explore some portion of the interior, so as to form an approximate idea of the extent, quality, and general appearance of the country, to enable me to transmit for His Excellency's consideration and approval, an estimate of the amount that will be required to pay to the natives in annual instalments, to complete the purchase.

The services of an experienced and active surveyor, to accompany me to the interior, are very necessary.

The sum which I propose to pay to the natives, subject to His Excellency's approval, as a first instalment for their land, is One Thousand Pounds (£1000) in silver; which amount I should wish to be placed at my disposal at Wanganui, with as little delay as possible, as the Ngatiapas prefer going there instead of Wellington, to receive their money.

I have the honour to remain


Sir,
Your most obdt. humble servant (Signed)
Donald McLean.
Inspector of Police. P.S. Requisition for I quire Elephant paper, for mapping, enclosed; and for 3 skins of parchment. To:- The Honourable The Colonial Secretary Wellington.

Mr. Kalham informed me that the N.Z. Company had engaged Mr. Park, as knowing the country Mr. McLean is purchasing. I have not yet received official notice of it; but however Mr. K. promised to send it immediately.

(Signed) A. Domett, March 23rd. 1849.

Part of:
Native Land Purchase Commissioner - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0003 (57 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1016516). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments