Object #1016409 from MS-Papers-0032-0276

4 pages written 3 Jul 1854 by Josiah Flight in Te Henui to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items). 43 letters addressed from Mangoraka, Te Ika Moana, Resident Magistrate's Office, New Plymouth, Henui, 1846-1872, and undated. Also letter from A D Flight, 6 Mar [187-], New Plymouth to Sir Donald McLean; letter from Josiah Flight to Thomas Kelly, 22 Jul 1870 re Cape Egmont Flax CompanyAlso poem addressed to `My dear Donald McLean' entitled `No Land' (on verso) written by Josiah Flight

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Henui, New Plymouth
3rd. July 1854.


My dear Sir,

Many thanks for the loan of "Erskine's Remarks", a book the perusal of which has given me great pleasure. I trust the reading of it will not only gratify but produce a beneficial influence on our minds. I have also to thank you for the New Zealander containing Col. Wynyard's speech on the opening of the "House of Representatives" which does credit to both his head and heart, and lastly but above all I have to thank you for your kind letter, more especially for the consideration you have therein shown for the suggestions I ventured with regard to the removal or otherwise of Mr. H. Halse. Permit me here to remark on your observation that other portions of the Country required efficient Native Officers, which seems to imply that I attached too much importance to the wants of this District so that other districts were not taken sufficiently into account; that whilst feeling a great anxiety for this Settlement I likewise considered that by a steady and efficient carrying out of those measures which had been commenced here by the Government for the welfare of the Maoris, or beneficial influence would be extended over the Aborigines in other parta of the Colony; and therefore that as the Officers now settled here had acquined to a considerable degree the confidence of the Natives it would be advisable if possible to continue them here and select others to commence and carry on operations in other parts. It has I dare

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English (ATL)

say occurred to you that a stronger staff of Native Officers (or rather Officers for Native work) should be kept up in each province of this Island where the Natives are so numerous from whence the younger Officers might be draughted to occupy intermediate stations as they may be required. Though the acquisition of land by the Government is of the first importance to both races I cannot but consider the bringing of the Natives under our own laws and inducing them to adopt more and more our modes of life as requiring all the aids that can be afforded by the people who have come here to possess themselves of the Maoris' Country. For this purpose it appears to me that more Officers of the General Government are required in each Province whose knowledge of the language, manners and customs, mode of thought of the Natives in fact who have studied their character in all its phases; so that in all cases where the Natives require advice and wish to place themselves under the protection and guidance of our laws they may easily and readily obtain the assistance they require. To a very great extent they have been thus assisted in this Province, and to this I think may be attributed the improving state of the Maoris here. Whilst on this subject I would just remark that the Assessors have not yet received their pay which is now three quarters of a year in arrear. They have behaved very well in the matter but I Trust they will not much longer remain unpaid.

About a fortnight ago I rode with Mr. Turton to the Ua to receive the contributions for the Wesleyan Native Chapel where nearly one hundred and fifty pounds were paid in, and about twenty five pounds more have been promised. It was a very interesting sight to witness the old and

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English (ATL)

young, men women and children pressing forward literally to pour in their money into the treasury (in the form of a milk pan) putting me forcibly in mind of the Hews of old bringing their contributions for the rearing of the tabernacle.

I was sorry that amongst the collected wisdom of New Zealand the Representatives of New Plymouth should have lent their aid in darkening the opening of the Session by voting against the motion for invoking the assistance of the Supreme in their deliberations. However there was some comfort in seeing that they were left in a very sorry minority. I am anxious to see how our three worthies get on.

Enclosed is the A/c. of the Grass and Clover seed. The amount has been paid me by Mr. Halse, and both Mr. Devenish and Mr. Kings A/cs. are receipted by them. I think Major Richmond must have at last received the seed in good time for sowing.

Crawley one of the old Whalers was this morning found between the Whaiwhaikaiho and Bnui Rivers dead. He had been sent to the Hospital under an attack of Delirium Tremens and is supposed to have wandered away during the night and fallen into the water.

Mrs. Flight begs me to present her very kind regards to you and my little girls desire to be remembered. We are all I am happy to say well although we sometimes grumble at the wet and mud with which we are now visited.

Believe me to e


Yours very faithfully
Josiah Flight.
D. Mclean Esq.
4th, July.

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English (ATL)


I expected the steamer would have been here by this time and therefore finished my letter last night. I have forgotten to tell you that the Plate for Captain King is arrived and is to be presented to him on Wednesday (tomorrow) week. Our old friend is looking very well and appears much gratified at this mark of respect towards him.

English (ATL)

Henui, New Plymouth
3rd. July 1854.


My dear Sir,

Many thanks for the loan of "Erskine's Remarks", a book the perusal of which has given me great pleasure. I trust the reading of it will not only gratify but produce a beneficial influence on our minds. I have also to thank you for the New Zealander containing Col. Wynyard's speech on the opening of the "House of Representatives" which does credit to both his head and heart, and lastly but above all I have to thank you for your kind letter, more especially for the consideration you have therein shown for the suggestions I ventured with regard to the removal or otherwise of Mr. H. Halse. Permit me here to remark on your observation that other portions of the Country required efficient Native Officers, which seems to imply that I attached too much importance to the wants of this District so that other districts were not taken sufficiently into account; that whilst feeling a great anxiety for this Settlement I likewise considered that by a steady and efficient carrying out of those measures which had been commenced here by the Government for the welfare of the Maoris, or beneficial influence would be extended over the Aborigines in other parta of the Colony; and therefore that as the Officers now settled here had acquined to a considerable degree the confidence of the Natives it would be advisable if possible to continue them here and select others to commence and carry on operations in other parts. It has I dare say occurred to you that a stronger staff of Native Officers (or rather Officers for Native work) should be kept up in each province of this Island where the Natives are so numerous from whence the younger Officers might be draughted to occupy intermediate stations as they may be required. Though the acquisition of land by the Government is of the first importance to both races I cannot but consider the bringing of the Natives under our own laws and inducing them to adopt more and more our modes of life as requiring all the aids that can be afforded by the people who have come here to possess themselves of the Maoris' Country. For this purpose it appears to me that more Officers of the General Government are required in each Province whose knowledge of the language, manners and customs, mode of thought of the Natives in fact who have studied their character in all its phases; so that in all cases where the Natives require advice and wish to place themselves under the protection and guidance of our laws they may easily and readily obtain the assistance they require. To a very great extent they have been thus assisted in this Province, and to this I think may be attributed the improving state of the Maoris here. Whilst on this subject I would just remark that the Assessors have not yet received their pay which is now three quarters of a year in arrear. They have behaved very well in the matter but I Trust they will not much longer remain unpaid.

About a fortnight ago I rode with Mr. Turton to the Ua to receive the contributions for the Wesleyan Native Chapel where nearly one hundred and fifty pounds were paid in, and about twenty five pounds more have been promised. It was a very interesting sight to witness the old and young, men women and children pressing forward literally to pour in their money into the treasury (in the form of a milk pan) putting me forcibly in mind of the Hews of old bringing their contributions for the rearing of the tabernacle.

I was sorry that amongst the collected wisdom of New Zealand the Representatives of New Plymouth should have lent their aid in darkening the opening of the Session by voting against the motion for invoking the assistance of the Supreme in their deliberations. However there was some comfort in seeing that they were left in a very sorry minority. I am anxious to see how our three worthies get on.

Enclosed is the A/c. of the Grass and Clover seed. The amount has been paid me by Mr. Halse, and both Mr. Devenish and Mr. Kings A/cs. are receipted by them. I think Major Richmond must have at last received the seed in good time for sowing.

Crawley one of the old Whalers was this morning found between the Whaiwhaikaiho and Bnui Rivers dead. He had been sent to the Hospital under an attack of Delirium Tremens and is supposed to have wandered away during the night and fallen into the water.

Mrs. Flight begs me to present her very kind regards to you and my little girls desire to be remembered. We are all I am happy to say well although we sometimes grumble at the wet and mud with which we are now visited.

Believe me to e


Yours very faithfully
Josiah Flight.
D. Mclean Esq.
4th, July.


I expected the steamer would have been here by this time and therefore finished my letter last night. I have forgotten to tell you that the Plate for Captain King is arrived and is to be presented to him on Wednesday (tomorrow) week. Our old friend is looking very well and appears much gratified at this mark of respect towards him.

Part of:
Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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