Object #1016336 from MS-Papers-0032-0540

3 pages written 9 Jun 1854 by John Rogan in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean in Auckland Region

From: Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items). 40 letters written from Awakino, Mokau, New Plymouth, Takatuhi, Whangaroa, Waingohu, Tokatoka (Kaipara), Whakaturai, Auckland, Coromandel, & Sydney (Sep 1858)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

till I saw Norris. He said he would produce your letter, and shew that I had offered myself at £200.I told him I had written asking you for £300, and my charge was a guinea for occasional work. He intimated that I was taking advantage of the Government; and if I did not accept his offer, it was probable the Government would not employ me at all. That he would recommend me to you for £300 as Sub-Land Commissioner for Taranaki, if I gave way to him, etc., etc., But I adhered to what I had said at first. You will, I have no doubt, receive a letter from him to my prejudice, but I am not afraid of that, I have worked for you for some time. You know all I can do, and what I cannot do; and I have never worked for the Superintendent or C. Brown; and he knows not whether I am worth anything or nothing. Yesterday he called at Halse's with your letter, and made an apology to me in so far as became his dignity as such. I read that part of your letter which referred to me, and which corresponds exactly with what I said to him. He little knows that you showed me that part of it when we were at Mokau. He pressed me to accept his terms again; but I asked him to allow me to leave it for the present, because I was under offer to you.

Mr. Cooper has agreed to give me a guinea a day when I am actually employed on the sueveys; and rainy weather, Norris work comes in. I have been surveying four days on this land, and Cooper has expressed himself well pleased with what I have done. I remain with the natives, and go to work as the natives, say at dark in the morning. I shall leave the subject of the Hua Block for Cooper to write on; but I think as far as I can learn from the natives, Cooper's management of this place, Te Hua, notwithstanding what the people say, will win him laurels, and will satisfy you, --- that is, if the present arrangement is adhered to by the natives. They consent to give up to Cooke, some of the most desirable land in the purchase; and a fortnight or so, will settle the question.

With respect to Mokau, I am keeping up correspondence with the people, and will continue to do so; except I hear from you to the contrary. Should you not think me worth the sum I ask, I shall be most happy to give any person you may send to Mokau, every information to the best of my ability; or I will go to Mokau for you for a month or two next summer, without any remuneration, as I feel confident of my success there. I am doing well in Taranaki; but your work I like better than any other employment, as I am fond of ranging about, and it agrees with my health; and I should not be at all afraid to attack a more difficult question than Mokau, if I had twelve months practice there.

I sincerely trust you will not take amiss my views in this matter, as I think I may without prejudice to myself, ask a sum which, at least in my opinion, I consider I am worth. I should, of course, keep a horse, which would be at the

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English (ATL)

entire service of the Government. Should you think of employing me, I should like if it were possible, to be under your control as much as possible; and Cooper, I think, would prefer to have me at work with him amongst the natives than Carrington; but I am going too dar.

I shall feel obliged if you will write to me at your convenience.

I remain my dear Sir,
Yours very truly (Signed)
J. Rogan.
To:- Donald McLean Esq. Land Commissioner Auckland.

English (ATL)

Letter from J. Rogan, to Donald McLean. Esq. J.P. Land Commissioner. dated 9th. June 1854.

COPY. New Plymouth
9th. June 1854.


My dear Sir,

I wrote a hurried letter to you after I reached town, but was unable to reply to your official letter then, as the mail left. I have done so by this post, and trust you will see my case in the same light as I take it. The first thing was to see Norris, who was glad to see me back. I told him it was probable I should leave him for a time, perhaps altogether; and I intended writing to you by last mail, (but was too late) seeking employment at a salary of £300 a year. He released me from our engagement, and has given me his surveying and plandrawing when I am otherwise disengaged; and should you not think me worth the sum I ask, I have the opportunity of returning again if I like.

The Superintendent appointed a time to meet me at his office; and after the usual preliminaries, told me you wrote to him at Mokau, saying I was prepared to accept £200. I said if you had written so, I did not explain myself to you properly, because I could enter into no arrangement till I saw Norris. He said he would produce your letter, and shew that I had offered myself at £200.I told him I had written asking you for £300, and my charge was a guinea for occasional work. He intimated that I was taking advantage of the Government; and if I did not accept his offer, it was probable the Government would not employ me at all. That he would recommend me to you for £300 as Sub-Land Commissioner for Taranaki, if I gave way to him, etc., etc., But I adhered to what I had said at first. You will, I have no doubt, receive a letter from him to my prejudice, but I am not afraid of that, I have worked for you for some time. You know all I can do, and what I cannot do; and I have never worked for the Superintendent or C. Brown; and he knows not whether I am worth anything or nothing. Yesterday he called at Halse's with your letter, and made an apology to me in so far as became his dignity as such. I read that part of your letter which referred to me, and which corresponds exactly with what I said to him. He little knows that you showed me that part of it when we were at Mokau. He pressed me to accept his terms again; but I asked him to allow me to leave it for the present, because I was under offer to you.

Mr. Cooper has agreed to give me a guinea a day when I am actually employed on the sueveys; and rainy weather, Norris work comes in. I have been surveying four days on this land, and Cooper has expressed himself well pleased with what I have done. I remain with the natives, and go to work as the natives, say at dark in the morning. I shall leave the subject of the Hua Block for Cooper to write on; but I think as far as I can learn from the natives, Cooper's management of this place, Te Hua, notwithstanding what the people say, will win him laurels, and will satisfy you, --- that is, if the present arrangement is adhered to by the natives. They consent to give up to Cooke, some of the most desirable land in the purchase; and a fortnight or so, will settle the question.

With respect to Mokau, I am keeping up correspondence with the people, and will continue to do so; except I hear from you to the contrary. Should you not think me worth the sum I ask, I shall be most happy to give any person you may send to Mokau, every information to the best of my ability; or I will go to Mokau for you for a month or two next summer, without any remuneration, as I feel confident of my success there. I am doing well in Taranaki; but your work I like better than any other employment, as I am fond of ranging about, and it agrees with my health; and I should not be at all afraid to attack a more difficult question than Mokau, if I had twelve months practice there.

I sincerely trust you will not take amiss my views in this matter, as I think I may without prejudice to myself, ask a sum which, at least in my opinion, I consider I am worth. I should, of course, keep a horse, which would be at the entire service of the Government. Should you think of employing me, I should like if it were possible, to be under your control as much as possible; and Cooper, I think, would prefer to have me at work with him amongst the natives than Carrington; but I am going too dar.

I shall feel obliged if you will write to me at your convenience.

I remain my dear Sir,
Yours very truly (Signed)
J. Rogan.
To:- Donald McLean Esq. Land Commissioner Auckland.

Part of:
Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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