Object #1016191 from MS-Papers-0032-0040

6 pages

From: Native Minister - Native schools, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0040 (27 digitised items). Includes letters from Maori informing McLean of the establishment of schools

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)


Pieces of correspondence between the Bishop of Waiapu and the Government, 1865-1870.

Correspondence opens in November 1865, when the Bishop requested assistance from the Government on the grounds that the removal of the scholars from Tu-ranga to Bay of Islands cost £100, and that supplies grown at Turanga, had to be purchased. Referred to Lt. Col. Russell and the Premier, who decided there were no funds available. Answer accordingly.

In a-Memo. dated March 24th. 1865, the Bishop advocates the continuance of Central Native Schools, instead of village ones. Col. Russell does not agree with him.

On the 9th. June 1866, the Bishop estimates the expenses of each pupil at the Central School at £13 and more. Shews a deficiency between receipts from the Government Grant and Expenditure of £152.13.2. Alludes also to the sum of £100 paid for charter of the "Tawera."

On the 6th. of June, writing to the Native Secretary, the Bishop refers to the debt lying on the Poverty Bay Central School and states he was given hopes it might be paid

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off. He points out that he heard that money of the sum of £10 is not sufficient. Colonel Russell replies that he has not yet had time to go into the Education question; but fears there are no funds to help the Bishop.

On the 28th. December 1866, the Bishop points out that the remnant of the Turanga scholars were removed to the Bay of Islands in 1865. He wishes much for a renewal of efforts at Turanganui, but the buildings there were all destroyed by the Hau Haus. He proposes to remove to Te Aute, but wants £1000 for the buildings as the proceeds of the school have all been expended on improving the property, fencing, etc., and adds that if Government does not help native schools, they must collapse.

Mr. Gisborne remarks in a memo. that 8000 acres at Te Aute have been occupied for 8 years without any attempt being made to fulfil the trust of education, for which they were granted. He thinks the state of things at Te Aute, and the request for £1000 most anomalous, thinks the whole of the Trust Funds want looking into. Answered by being told that in Mr. Buchanan's

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absence, no decision could be come to.

On November 24th. 1866, the Bishop of Wellington writes to the Native Minister, stating that the Bishop of Waiapu wishes to resussitate the Central School at Te Aute, and recommends the step.

On this Mr. Rolleston writes a Memo, wondering why the school should not go to Turanga, instead of going to Napier. He does not recognise the principle that the Government is called upon to improve the property of private bodies, such as the Church of England. He points out that this is a school for grown men, giving religious teaching of a special character, and is of the opinion that the public funds are well expended on the general, not the special, education of the Maori.

On the 29th. March 1867, the Bishop of Waiapu reiterates his request for £1000 for buildings, and is answered by Mr. Richmond that it is impossible to grant this request. He proposes during the next session to introduce a Bill to set aside funds for native schools in proportion to success. If from some other source the Te Aute School is started,

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a small grant might be given.

On the 8th. August 1867, Mr. Carleton presents a petition from the Bishop of Waiapu, setting forth that the school buildings in Poverty Bay have been destroyed to the amount of £4000; that he wishes to establish a Central School at Te Aute, that the school estate will not, for twelve months, be able to support the school; that menawhile, buildings are required, and petitions The House of Representatives for such buildings.

On October 14th. 1867, Mr. Richmond writes to the Bishop of Waiapu that a Committee of the House which has sat, has not reported favourably on Compensation; and that the Government have no means to meet claims except by the sale of confiscated territory, which is only sufficient for the Military settlers; and that he cannot hold out any hopes of the Bishop having assistance.

August 6th. 1867, writing to the Native Secretary, the Bishop of Waiapu points out that things are in a very unsettled state in Poverty Bay,

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on account of no action having been taken with regard to the Confiscated Lands; and suggests that Mr. McLean is the only man who can solve the difficulty.

August 6th. 1867, the Bishop of Waiapu avows his intention of starting afresh the Central Schools, and says he is prepared to renew the effort at Te Aute. He asks for no assistance beyond buildings which he states were promised to the natives on their giving up lands for the schools. The debt which has been incurred will be cleared off in twelve months.

Mr. Richmond, in a Memo, does not think there are any funds available for Compensation for losses on the East Coast.

April 22nd. 1870, the Bishop of Waiapu writes to the Superintendent of Napier, stating that the Te Aute School Estate is flourishing, but wants buildings. He understands that there is a Fund in the hands of the Government,

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for the erection of Maori Schools.

In forwarding this letter on the 27th. of April, Mr. Ormond points out that a portion of the Te Aute School Estate is held in trust for both races, and both ought to participate in its benefits. The portion given by the Maoris is held in trust for them.

Mr. Halse points out that the Bishop's allusion is to Clause 4 of Native Schools Act 1867, but the unexpended balance of some appropriated by the Native Schools Act 1858 has been reduced to £1000.

Mr. Gisborne writes to Mr. Ormond, 16th. May 1870, and tells him the mode of application for grants of this kind, is prescribed by the Act of 1867; and no application can be considered which does not come in that form. He points out that the Trustees ought to have devoted some of the profits of the estate to the education of the natives, and not expend it all upon the improvement of the land.

English (ATL)


Pieces of correspondence between the Bishop of Waiapu and the Government, 1865-1870.

Correspondence opens in November 1865, when the Bishop requested assistance from the Government on the grounds that the removal of the scholars from Tu-ranga to Bay of Islands cost £100, and that supplies grown at Turanga, had to be purchased. Referred to Lt. Col. Russell and the Premier, who decided there were no funds available. Answer accordingly.

In a-Memo. dated March 24th. 1865, the Bishop advocates the continuance of Central Native Schools, instead of village ones. Col. Russell does not agree with him.

On the 9th. June 1866, the Bishop estimates the expenses of each pupil at the Central School at £13 and more. Shews a deficiency between receipts from the Government Grant and Expenditure of £152.13.2. Alludes also to the sum of £100 paid for charter of the "Tawera."

On the 6th. of June, writing to the Native Secretary, the Bishop refers to the debt lying on the Poverty Bay Central School and states he was given hopes it might be paid off. He points out that he heard that money of the sum of £10 is not sufficient. Colonel Russell replies that he has not yet had time to go into the Education question; but fears there are no funds to help the Bishop.

On the 28th. December 1866, the Bishop points out that the remnant of the Turanga scholars were removed to the Bay of Islands in 1865. He wishes much for a renewal of efforts at Turanganui, but the buildings there were all destroyed by the Hau Haus. He proposes to remove to Te Aute, but wants £1000 for the buildings as the proceeds of the school have all been expended on improving the property, fencing, etc., and adds that if Government does not help native schools, they must collapse.

Mr. Gisborne remarks in a memo. that 8000 acres at Te Aute have been occupied for 8 years without any attempt being made to fulfil the trust of education, for which they were granted. He thinks the state of things at Te Aute, and the request for £1000 most anomalous, thinks the whole of the Trust Funds want looking into. Answered by being told that in Mr. Buchanan's absence, no decision could be come to.

On November 24th. 1866, the Bishop of Wellington writes to the Native Minister, stating that the Bishop of Waiapu wishes to resussitate the Central School at Te Aute, and recommends the step.

On this Mr. Rolleston writes a Memo, wondering why the school should not go to Turanga, instead of going to Napier. He does not recognise the principle that the Government is called upon to improve the property of private bodies, such as the Church of England. He points out that this is a school for grown men, giving religious teaching of a special character, and is of the opinion that the public funds are well expended on the general, not the special, education of the Maori.

On the 29th. March 1867, the Bishop of Waiapu reiterates his request for £1000 for buildings, and is answered by Mr. Richmond that it is impossible to grant this request. He proposes during the next session to introduce a Bill to set aside funds for native schools in proportion to success. If from some other source the Te Aute School is started, a small grant might be given.

On the 8th. August 1867, Mr. Carleton presents a petition from the Bishop of Waiapu, setting forth that the school buildings in Poverty Bay have been destroyed to the amount of £4000; that he wishes to establish a Central School at Te Aute, that the school estate will not, for twelve months, be able to support the school; that menawhile, buildings are required, and petitions The House of Representatives for such buildings.

On October 14th. 1867, Mr. Richmond writes to the Bishop of Waiapu that a Committee of the House which has sat, has not reported favourably on Compensation; and that the Government have no means to meet claims except by the sale of confiscated territory, which is only sufficient for the Military settlers; and that he cannot hold out any hopes of the Bishop having assistance.

August 6th. 1867, writing to the Native Secretary, the Bishop of Waiapu points out that things are in a very unsettled state in Poverty Bay, on account of no action having been taken with regard to the Confiscated Lands; and suggests that Mr. McLean is the only man who can solve the difficulty.

August 6th. 1867, the Bishop of Waiapu avows his intention of starting afresh the Central Schools, and says he is prepared to renew the effort at Te Aute. He asks for no assistance beyond buildings which he states were promised to the natives on their giving up lands for the schools. The debt which has been incurred will be cleared off in twelve months.

Mr. Richmond, in a Memo, does not think there are any funds available for Compensation for losses on the East Coast.

April 22nd. 1870, the Bishop of Waiapu writes to the Superintendent of Napier, stating that the Te Aute School Estate is flourishing, but wants buildings. He understands that there is a Fund in the hands of the Government, for the erection of Maori Schools.

In forwarding this letter on the 27th. of April, Mr. Ormond points out that a portion of the Te Aute School Estate is held in trust for both races, and both ought to participate in its benefits. The portion given by the Maoris is held in trust for them.

Mr. Halse points out that the Bishop's allusion is to Clause 4 of Native Schools Act 1867, but the unexpended balance of some appropriated by the Native Schools Act 1858 has been reduced to £1000.

Mr. Gisborne writes to Mr. Ormond, 16th. May 1870, and tells him the mode of application for grants of this kind, is prescribed by the Act of 1867; and no application can be considered which does not come in that form. He points out that the Trustees ought to have devoted some of the profits of the estate to the education of the natives, and not expend it all upon the improvement of the land.

Part of:
Native Minister - Native schools, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0040 (27 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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