Object #1016145 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

5 pages written 8 Nov 1869 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

8 November 1869

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I dare say you will be looking for a letter and what news I have from here. I was pleased to hear that you are in good health and spirits and that the native question to all appearances is likely to be brought to a better sett[l]ement than it ever has been since the war. Indeed it was what I always thought you could do if you were left allone. Everyone here but the very few your old opponents, and they even are dying a natural death, are in great hope that you will be able to do wonders, in fact more than any one could be expected to do however let me tell you that the feeling of security among all classes had has been very strong since your going into power. Is Indeed wonderful and pleasing to think that it is so. The gold question made a great stir for a bit but the reaction since the prospecting party has returned has put a great damp etc uppon all. I hope it may be got yet. The only feasible thing

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English (MD)

I now see to make money of if properly gone about is the flax. I have tried the flax on your run in different place and it is first class. I am going down to Mr Nelson's mill with some of it in a day or two as he kindly promised to put it through the mill for me so as to get samples and if I find it will pay well, which I have no doubt it will, I will endeavour to get a mill up and commence and dress all my own side and then enter into an agreement with you to dress or pay you so much a ton for yours, the same as other people are gaving. There is a great quantity of flax in the swamp at the back of the station and a large lot down at Roys Hill and considerable in the Maraekakaho Creek. I saw an article in the Hawke's Bay last week reffering to some flack [flax] sent home from Canterbury dryed like hay that brought £24-5 per ton in London. If I can find out the truth in this statement I will prepare and dry a cwt ot two under cover and send it home to test what it will do. Indeed I am now drying some to take to Napier next week. When I here of your being

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English (MD)

at Wellington I will send you a roll of mutton and some flax samples. The stones I colected in the back country did not true out any gold but strong indications of it. They are going to commence shearing by the end of this week. We had a good deal of rain and the grass was never so abundant. Know one could believe how beautiful the padocks here are and the hills with English grass. You could mow it on the hill in many places. It would do your heart good to see this place now. I had Condie over it last Sunday and pointing out to him the great necessity of surface sowing and he said their was nothing like it. What young Archy sowed last autumn on Oliver run is doing well. I do all I can to hint at them and God knows they want it. I heard wild dog on the run a few days ago and young Archy & Twigg killed him a day or two afterwards. He did not do any damage that is known. I do think that after shearing Condie ought to do without Twigg for as far as I can see it is the one waiting on the other and doing precious little. Alex appears to take some interest at times. Annabella is with him and backwards and forwards up here. She appears

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English (MD)

in good spirits at times but says she misses you. My wife is in very poor health of late. I think it is the smokeness of the place and the heat and I am going to put up two rooms in front. Holt says he will find all the material and build them cottage fashion for £80 and at the same time if I find that the straw process will answer for the flax I will get a portable iron shed up to dry and pack the flax in at the same time. It is know time now to let anything slip that will make money when there is no demand for sheep. I do not believe in alowing Skellicorn to wash anything but the locks as I see it does not pay. The locks of course pay to wash so you had better write Condie to that effect as I do not like to interfear. I hope you have had better accounts of dear little Douglas's health. I fear that the home winters are two cold for him. Hector Smith in writing to Duff mentions that Tollemache wrote him he would require a change. I believe the best change would be to bring him home to his native country in time beffore decise [disease] may take any further root. I mention this as I am very anxious about the dear boy. I would like to see you for a short time but I supose I need

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

expect you here for some time. Ormond is not so very popolar [popular] altho a good man. I hear that Fox and Vogle are not at all popolar and likely not to hold office long but L here that will not at all effect you. I have told you all I know.


Always your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

8 November 1869

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I dare say you will be looking for a letter and what news I have from here. I was pleased to hear that you are in good health and spirits and that the native question to all appearances is likely to be brought to a better sett[l]ement than it ever has been since the war. Indeed it was what I always thought you could do if you were left allone. Everyone here but the very few your old opponents, and they even are dying a natural death, are in great hope that you will be able to do wonders, in fact more than any one could be expected to do however let me tell you that the feeling of security among all classes had has been very strong since your going into power. Is Indeed wonderful and pleasing to think that it is so. The gold question made a great stir for a bit but the reaction since the prospecting party has returned has put a great damp etc uppon all. I hope it may be got yet. The only feasible thing I now see to make money of if properly gone about is the flax. I have tried the flax on your run in different place and it is first class. I am going down to Mr Nelson's mill with some of it in a day or two as he kindly promised to put it through the mill for me so as to get samples and if I find it will pay well, which I have no doubt it will, I will endeavour to get a mill up and commence and dress all my own side and then enter into an agreement with you to dress or pay you so much a ton for yours, the same as other people are gaving. There is a great quantity of flax in the swamp at the back of the station and a large lot down at Roys Hill and considerable in the Maraekakaho Creek. I saw an article in the Hawke's Bay last week reffering to some flack [flax] sent home from Canterbury dryed like hay that brought £24-5 per ton in London. If I can find out the truth in this statement I will prepare and dry a cwt ot two under cover and send it home to test what it will do. Indeed I am now drying some to take to Napier next week. When I here of your being at Wellington I will send you a roll of mutton and some flax samples. The stones I colected in the back country did not true out any gold but strong indications of it. They are going to commence shearing by the end of this week. We had a good deal of rain and the grass was never so abundant. Know one could believe how beautiful the padocks here are and the hills with English grass. You could mow it on the hill in many places. It would do your heart good to see this place now. I had Condie over it last Sunday and pointing out to him the great necessity of surface sowing and he said their was nothing like it. What young Archy sowed last autumn on Oliver run is doing well. I do all I can to hint at them and God knows they want it. I heard wild dog on the run a few days ago and young Archy & Twigg killed him a day or two afterwards. He did not do any damage that is known. I do think that after shearing Condie ought to do without Twigg for as far as I can see it is the one waiting on the other and doing precious little. Alex appears to take some interest at times. Annabella is with him and backwards and forwards up here. She appears in good spirits at times but says she misses you. My wife is in very poor health of late. I think it is the smokeness of the place and the heat and I am going to put up two rooms in front. Holt says he will find all the material and build them cottage fashion for £80 and at the same time if I find that the straw process will answer for the flax I will get a portable iron shed up to dry and pack the flax in at the same time. It is know time now to let anything slip that will make money when there is no demand for sheep. I do not believe in alowing Skellicorn to wash anything but the locks as I see it does not pay. The locks of course pay to wash so you had better write Condie to that effect as I do not like to interfear. I hope you have had better accounts of dear little Douglas's health. I fear that the home winters are two cold for him. Hector Smith in writing to Duff mentions that Tollemache wrote him he would require a change. I believe the best change would be to bring him home to his native country in time beffore decise [disease] may take any further root. I mention this as I am very anxious about the dear boy. I would like to see you for a short time but I supose I need expect you here for some time. Ormond is not so very popolar [popular] altho a good man. I hear that Fox and Vogle are not at all popolar and likely not to hold office long but L here that will not at all effect you. I have told you all I know.


Always your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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