Object #1015944 from MS-Papers-0032-0312

4 pages written 8 Mar 1852 by Henry Halse in Huatoki

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items). 43 letters written from New Plymouth and Huatoki. Includes copies of letters from Wiremu Kingi, Witi, and Aperahama, Te Kani, 1851

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Private Huatoki

Mar. 8, 1852.



Dear Sir,

I was glad to receive your packet by last Saturday's O. mail announcing that you had been officially informed of a permanent salary of £400 a year, and offer my congratulations with a hope that your wanderings are well nigh over and that there is some prospect of your visiting old Taranaki once more. If it be possible silence absentee opposition and put us in possession of the land north of Waiwakaiho and on to the Hua by so doing I think the road to Waitara would be tolerably clear. You will be pleased to hear that old Iharaira (E Tuki) came to me last Saturday

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English (ATL)

and through his mouth piece, Tamati Waka, desired to be appointed one of the 12 assessors - now, without having had an opportunity to inquire into the cause of a change so unexpected and so sudden I am inclined to regard it favourably hotwithstanding the fickle character of the tribe to which he belongs.

I have not now time to give an answer about your farm but think a good oppy. offers for disposing of it to Mr. Vickers, one of our new merchants, who has recently purchased Gudgeon's section (formerly Cap/. King's at the back of yours) and I went with him to see the boundaries defined - he then spoke to me about yours and now that I know your intention I will go into the thing in a proper manner.

I cannot conceive how I could be so stupid as to forget all mention of the "postage covers" which I received

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English (ATL)

from Corbett on the 21st. of last October - however I am obligec for the reminder and will now hand them in to the Sub-Treasurer for payment and so get rid of them. Your clothes are attended to, and with the exception of some rather the worse for wear, ready for use at any moment.

The "William Hyde" is here, via Canterbury with 17 passengers and goods, hence to Hokianga. The schooner "Elizabeth" with timber from Manukao and another supposed to be the "Shepherdess" but it is blowing so furiously from the South West that the boat can't get off, in the mean time we are in a delightful state of suspense.

Hitherto I have been under the impression that your friends supplied the chit chat and gossip of this wonderful place as regularly as I myself forward the dry fortnighly overland; but, now that I find myself mistaken and that they are not such good correspondents

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English (ATL)

as they should be, I will try to send (part of) a budget of news required by next opportunity with one condition, excuse me - that in future you will let us know your whereabouts - should you continue wandering - in order that I and others may have the pleasure of contradicting various melancholy news, such as the case of drowning at Hawkes Bay, illness bordering on death etc. etc. which have from time to time got in circulation here.

Hoping Mrs. McLean is well, I remain, Dear sir,
Sincerely yours,
H. Halse.

English (ATL)

Private Huatoki

Mar. 8, 1852.



Dear Sir,

I was glad to receive your packet by last Saturday's O. mail announcing that you had been officially informed of a permanent salary of £400 a year, and offer my congratulations with a hope that your wanderings are well nigh over and that there is some prospect of your visiting old Taranaki once more. If it be possible silence absentee opposition and put us in possession of the land north of Waiwakaiho and on to the Hua by so doing I think the road to Waitara would be tolerably clear. You will be pleased to hear that old Iharaira (E Tuki) came to me last Saturday and through his mouth piece, Tamati Waka, desired to be appointed one of the 12 assessors - now, without having had an opportunity to inquire into the cause of a change so unexpected and so sudden I am inclined to regard it favourably hotwithstanding the fickle character of the tribe to which he belongs.

I have not now time to give an answer about your farm but think a good oppy. offers for disposing of it to Mr. Vickers, one of our new merchants, who has recently purchased Gudgeon's section (formerly Cap/. King's at the back of yours) and I went with him to see the boundaries defined - he then spoke to me about yours and now that I know your intention I will go into the thing in a proper manner.

I cannot conceive how I could be so stupid as to forget all mention of the "postage covers" which I received from Corbett on the 21st. of last October - however I am obligec for the reminder and will now hand them in to the Sub-Treasurer for payment and so get rid of them. Your clothes are attended to, and with the exception of some rather the worse for wear, ready for use at any moment.

The "William Hyde" is here, via Canterbury with 17 passengers and goods, hence to Hokianga. The schooner "Elizabeth" with timber from Manukao and another supposed to be the "Shepherdess" but it is blowing so furiously from the South West that the boat can't get off, in the mean time we are in a delightful state of suspense.

Hitherto I have been under the impression that your friends supplied the chit chat and gossip of this wonderful place as regularly as I myself forward the dry fortnighly overland; but, now that I find myself mistaken and that they are not such good correspondents as they should be, I will try to send (part of) a budget of news required by next opportunity with one condition, excuse me - that in future you will let us know your whereabouts - should you continue wandering - in order that I and others may have the pleasure of contradicting various melancholy news, such as the case of drowning at Hawkes Bay, illness bordering on death etc. etc. which have from time to time got in circulation here.

Hoping Mrs. McLean is well, I remain, Dear sir,
Sincerely yours,
H. Halse.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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