Object #1015850 from MS-Papers-0032-0313

7 pages written 13 Jan 1855 by Henry Halse in Taranaki Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0313 (26 digitised items). 26 letters written from New Plymouth. Includes copies of two letters in Maori, 1855

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Taranaki
January 13, 1855


My dear Sir,

I was unable to write to you last week and have but little to write about by this day's post.

Major Nugent left for Auckland overland last Tuesday and as far as I can judge was pleased with the Province and the attention shewn him - He is the bearer of many letters to the Governor, including one from Wiremu Kingi and Katatore, and has received the best information upon matters generally -his report will therefore be anxiously looked for and

Page 2 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

read with unusual interest.

I am sorry to say that a feeling of insecurity is gaining ground here and that our numbers are likely to be diminished - several persons, all of whom were doing well, have already gone northward, and I much fear that another brush amongst the natives will be a severe blow to the progress of this Province. On my way to the Poutoko yesterday, with our Superintendent and Mr.W.King, to endeavour to make some final arrangement about the cattle running upon native lands - an everlasting source of complaint - I found Poharama

Page 3 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

busily engaged throwing up a pa close to his residence, assisted by Henere te Whare and his people, a circumstance that set me thinking as shewing the very close intimacy existing between them, which might probably be made use of to our advantage.

A large pa has been erected at Huirangi since I was last there, capable of containing 3 or 400 hundred men -I was informed that its erection was a precautionary step against an expected visit from Taupo and Whanganui to avenge the deaths of the two men belonging to those tribes who fell at Mamaku when assisting

Page 4 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Ihaia -

Mr.Tamati Waka, the firebrand of the district, has again induced his too willing listeners, to place a stringent 'tapu' on the roads to Town to annoy W.Kingi and his people, a proceeding that I regret we are unable to check. W.K. was very attentive to the Major and even put him across the river in a smart canoe paddled by himself. His remarks were altogether different to those expressed on a previous occasion when the Superintendent was present. In place of repeating his intention to adopt a strict neutrality, he declared that if an European should be killed

Page 5 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

through the folly of natives dragging their quarrel into the European boundry, he would join the latter in driving the former away. He particularly asked me to visit him occasionally -

The wounded men of Ihaia's party are doing remarkably well and Ani is said to be convalescent - what extraordinary people they are for recovery from wounds that appear to be quite beyond the reach of art -

A party of Ngatiruanui natives is expected at the Poutoko this day - their object is said to be peaceable and to fetch some iron work for a mill - Te Ngahuru, I understand, will send his men to

Page 6 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Town for the iron and so prevent an unpleasant meeting between the hostile tribes -

I enclose copy deed of sale and native correspondence -

Hoping you are well and your little boy

Believe me
Faithfully yours
H.Halse

English (ATL)

Taranaki
January 13, 1855


My dear Sir,

I was unable to write to you last week and have but little to write about by this day's post.

Major Nugent left for Auckland overland last Tuesday and as far as I can judge was pleased with the Province and the attention shewn him - He is the bearer of many letters to the Governor, including one from Wiremu Kingi and Katatore, and has received the best information upon matters generally -his report will therefore be anxiously looked for and read with unusual interest.

I am sorry to say that a feeling of insecurity is gaining ground here and that our numbers are likely to be diminished - several persons, all of whom were doing well, have already gone northward, and I much fear that another brush amongst the natives will be a severe blow to the progress of this Province. On my way to the Poutoko yesterday, with our Superintendent and Mr.W.King, to endeavour to make some final arrangement about the cattle running upon native lands - an everlasting source of complaint - I found Poharama busily engaged throwing up a pa close to his residence, assisted by Henere te Whare and his people, a circumstance that set me thinking as shewing the very close intimacy existing between them, which might probably be made use of to our advantage.

A large pa has been erected at Huirangi since I was last there, capable of containing 3 or 400 hundred men -I was informed that its erection was a precautionary step against an expected visit from Taupo and Whanganui to avenge the deaths of the two men belonging to those tribes who fell at Mamaku when assisting Ihaia -

Mr.Tamati Waka, the firebrand of the district, has again induced his too willing listeners, to place a stringent 'tapu' on the roads to Town to annoy W.Kingi and his people, a proceeding that I regret we are unable to check. W.K. was very attentive to the Major and even put him across the river in a smart canoe paddled by himself. His remarks were altogether different to those expressed on a previous occasion when the Superintendent was present. In place of repeating his intention to adopt a strict neutrality, he declared that if an European should be killed through the folly of natives dragging their quarrel into the European boundry, he would join the latter in driving the former away. He particularly asked me to visit him occasionally -

The wounded men of Ihaia's party are doing remarkably well and Ani is said to be convalescent - what extraordinary people they are for recovery from wounds that appear to be quite beyond the reach of art -

A party of Ngatiruanui natives is expected at the Poutoko this day - their object is said to be peaceable and to fetch some iron work for a mill - Te Ngahuru, I understand, will send his men to Town for the iron and so prevent an unpleasant meeting between the hostile tribes -

I enclose copy deed of sale and native correspondence -

Hoping you are well and your little boy

Believe me
Faithfully yours
H.Halse

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0313 (26 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1015850). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments