Object #1015841 from MS-Papers-0032-0215

2 pages written 14 Oct 1845 by Sir Donald McLean in Taranaki Region

From: Inward letters - George Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0215 (29 digitised items). 28 letters written from Auckland and Bay of Islands, 1844-1874. Piece-level inventory in folder (list excludes letters accessioned in 1969)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 2. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Copy.
Taranaki.
14 Octr., 1845.


My dear Sir,

I had the pleausure of addressing you on the 24 of Septr. by a small vessel bound to Wangaroa which letter I hope you have long ere now received it contained an account of the disreputable conduct of Messrs. Spencer and Seranche with a relation of passing events up to that time. Since then nothing has occurred to affect the peace of our Settlement both Europeans and Natives are industriously pursuing their agricultural pursuits the latter benefitting by the knowledge and experience of the former and both looking forward to a prosperous season and remunerative return for their industry.

Within the last few weeks I have recd. several letters from the absentees at Waikanae and Wellington the latter appear anxious respecting their share of compensation and are desirous subject to His Excellencys approval to come up here in a body and receive it ki runga i te oneone after which some of them are anxious (and have been hoarding money) to buy a vessel to carry them off to the South Sea Islands. The Wanganui Settlers most of whom are leaving there for Wellington and other places in consequence of the fears entertained by themselves and the Natives of a hostile descent on their neighbourhood by the tribes of Hamaki Rotorua and Taupo that the latter two urged and invited by the heathen Natives of Wanganui are concerting plans for such an excursion is most probable but I have great doubts of Taraias being there as I hear he was at Auckland three weeks ago - messengers have been sent up from there twice by the Revd. R. Taylor and the Natives requesting my interference but could not think of leaving here in the absence of Messrs. Bolland and Turton in case any differences might arise - now that they are retd, and that there is nothing I know off that requires immediate attention here - I will leave tomorrow for the interior to ascertain the real state of the country in that quarter and endeavour to affect a conciliation - In accordance with the tenor of your letter of the 26 June I have furnished the Supt. of the Southern Division with a copy of my reports in reference to Wanganui and as that place is more contiguous to Wellington, I would be glad to know if it is to be included in the charge of the Southern Protector that the Natives might apply to him also to prevent any misunderstanding with that gentleman which might be the case if unacquainted with the limits of our boundarys my object is in furtherance of your intimation in the Native Gazette to look after that

Page 2 of 2. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

place till otherways advised by you. I am just in receipt of your letter by the Brig and glad to find you are satisfied with my last report an approving of my frequent visits to the interior which I am glad you have observed as it strengthens my resolutions to go there especially as danger is anticipated from that quarter every preliminary arrangement is already made the Chiefs are here with me enquiring into their several charges as to their conduct to the Pakehas in my absence this occupies their mind and as a proud people they delight in having confidence placed in them to this meausure I attribute their quietness when I last left here for two months.

As you would expect there are not many easy or idle moments for me I have to write to Mokau immediately respecting the Hydra which I am delighted to hear has been laid hold of this will have an excellent effect with the Natives, as you direct I will place you in full information on this subject on my return home when you will again here from me and sooner if possible. His Excellencys friendship on this as well as every other occasion is highly applauded by them and I am happy to find how universally esteemed he is by our Natives here.

How fortunate it is that Mr. Henry is fast recovering and likely to have the use of his leg shortly - with every desire for the health and prosperity of yourself and family,


I remain, My dear Sir,
Yours very truly,
Dond. McLean.

English (ATL)

Copy.
Taranaki.
14 Octr., 1845.


My dear Sir,

I had the pleausure of addressing you on the 24 of Septr. by a small vessel bound to Wangaroa which letter I hope you have long ere now received it contained an account of the disreputable conduct of Messrs. Spencer and Seranche with a relation of passing events up to that time. Since then nothing has occurred to affect the peace of our Settlement both Europeans and Natives are industriously pursuing their agricultural pursuits the latter benefitting by the knowledge and experience of the former and both looking forward to a prosperous season and remunerative return for their industry.

Within the last few weeks I have recd. several letters from the absentees at Waikanae and Wellington the latter appear anxious respecting their share of compensation and are desirous subject to His Excellencys approval to come up here in a body and receive it ki runga i te oneone after which some of them are anxious (and have been hoarding money) to buy a vessel to carry them off to the South Sea Islands. The Wanganui Settlers most of whom are leaving there for Wellington and other places in consequence of the fears entertained by themselves and the Natives of a hostile descent on their neighbourhood by the tribes of Hamaki Rotorua and Taupo that the latter two urged and invited by the heathen Natives of Wanganui are concerting plans for such an excursion is most probable but I have great doubts of Taraias being there as I hear he was at Auckland three weeks ago - messengers have been sent up from there twice by the Revd. R. Taylor and the Natives requesting my interference but could not think of leaving here in the absence of Messrs. Bolland and Turton in case any differences might arise - now that they are retd, and that there is nothing I know off that requires immediate attention here - I will leave tomorrow for the interior to ascertain the real state of the country in that quarter and endeavour to affect a conciliation - In accordance with the tenor of your letter of the 26 June I have furnished the Supt. of the Southern Division with a copy of my reports in reference to Wanganui and as that place is more contiguous to Wellington, I would be glad to know if it is to be included in the charge of the Southern Protector that the Natives might apply to him also to prevent any misunderstanding with that gentleman which might be the case if unacquainted with the limits of our boundarys my object is in furtherance of your intimation in the Native Gazette to look after that place till otherways advised by you. I am just in receipt of your letter by the Brig and glad to find you are satisfied with my last report an approving of my frequent visits to the interior which I am glad you have observed as it strengthens my resolutions to go there especially as danger is anticipated from that quarter every preliminary arrangement is already made the Chiefs are here with me enquiring into their several charges as to their conduct to the Pakehas in my absence this occupies their mind and as a proud people they delight in having confidence placed in them to this meausure I attribute their quietness when I last left here for two months.

As you would expect there are not many easy or idle moments for me I have to write to Mokau immediately respecting the Hydra which I am delighted to hear has been laid hold of this will have an excellent effect with the Natives, as you direct I will place you in full information on this subject on my return home when you will again here from me and sooner if possible. His Excellencys friendship on this as well as every other occasion is highly applauded by them and I am happy to find how universally esteemed he is by our Natives here.

How fortunate it is that Mr. Henry is fast recovering and likely to have the use of his leg shortly - with every desire for the health and prosperity of yourself and family,


I remain, My dear Sir,
Yours very truly,
Dond. McLean.

Part of:
Inward letters - George Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0215 (29 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1015841). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments