Object #1015594 from MS-Papers-0032-0811

9 pages written by Catherine Isabella McLean in Maraekakaho to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Catherine Hart (sister); Catherine Isabella McLean (sister-in-law), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0811 (71 digitised items). Catherine McLean (later Hart) wrote from Stobs Castle, Hawick, Roxburghshire and from Edinburgh, Scotland prior to her arrival in New Zealand in 1861, and from Wellington, Hawke's Bay and Christchurch, 1861-1875, including many undated letters and fragments. The folder contains 9 letters written by Catherine Isabella McLean, from Maraekakaho and Glenorchy, Hawke's Bay, 1861-1875.Includes one letter written by Annabella McLean from Edinburgh in Nov 1862

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Maraekakaho
Augt 23rd


My dear brother

You very kind letter of August the 5th I duly received and was glad to hear you were well. We were kept in great suspense regarding you as we fully expected you by the 'Queen'. She

Page 2 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

went on direct to Wellington without calling at Napier and for seven days considerable anxiety was felt regarding her safety. I am thankful to say that my little charge is quite well and very happy. I am sure that you will think him much grown when you see him.

His little companion is still here who is an amiable fine boy and they are happy together. I am sorry to tell you that Catherine is still very poorly but I trust that she will soon get strong again. One great comfort is that we are not nearly so pestered with strangers as we used to be.

Page 3 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


My dear brother it grieves me to the very heart to be again obliged to tell you that no improvement what ever has as yet taken place in Alex's conduct. Catherine as well as myself has done everything in our power to induce him to stay more at home but neither persuasion nor entreaty

Page 4 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


2nd
seems to have the slightest effect upon him. I am sure ever since you left here that he has not been one day duly sober. I know not what is to be done with him or where he can get the money to spend for it must take quite a fortune to keep him up and my great fear is that he will come to an untimely end.

Page 5 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


As Archy is writing to you it is needless for me to take any notice of the way that Alexdr has acted regarding the Mourris land but to say the leste of it I think that he has acted very deceitfully in that affair. I must again thank you for your kind and affectionate letter.

It has been a great comfort to me for I was in a very disponding mood when it came. You are labouring under a "very" great mistake if you think that you don't stand very high in my estimation but I do not think that I shall ever love any of you as I do Archy.

Page 6 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


From your discription of the fair stranger that lately visited the metropolis I do not think that they have left a day too soon for "your" peace of mind but notwithstanding all their darling charms I think you have better wait and see whats to be had in the land of "Burns" and Mr Ferard accompany you on your visits to that gay stranger.

Page 7 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


3rd
I feel grateful to you for the kind manner in which you express yr willingness to bring me the cloth for my skirt. There is nothing else that I require at present but as we have only flax mattresses at the station which is anything but comfortable for an invilide

Page 8 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Catherine and myself would feel very much obliged if you would bring down a hair mattress. Perhaps you may have one of yr own not disposed of. If not you may get one cheap in Auckland. There is not such a thing to be had here. We have not heard but once from Canterbury since John left, and no letters by the last English mail. I am glad that you wrote to Uncle, poor old man. I do hope that he will not form such a foolish connection. I have no more news to send you and with our united love


I am my dear Donald always
Yr affectionate sister Catherine

Page 9 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


Douglas tells me to send you his love and that you are to come soon. He is a very good boy and very obedient.

I feel thankful to you [crossed out]

English (MD)

Maraekakaho
Augt 23rd


My dear brother

You very kind letter of August the 5th I duly received and was glad to hear you were well. We were kept in great suspense regarding you as we fully expected you by the 'Queen'. She went on direct to Wellington without calling at Napier and for seven days considerable anxiety was felt regarding her safety. I am thankful to say that my little charge is quite well and very happy. I am sure that you will think him much grown when you see him.

His little companion is still here who is an amiable fine boy and they are happy together. I am sorry to tell you that Catherine is still very poorly but I trust that she will soon get strong again. One great comfort is that we are not nearly so pestered with strangers as we used to be.

My dear brother it grieves me to the very heart to be again obliged to tell you that no improvement what ever has as yet taken place in Alex's conduct. Catherine as well as myself has done everything in our power to induce him to stay more at home but neither persuasion nor entreaty
2nd
seems to have the slightest effect upon him. I am sure ever since you left here that he has not been one day duly sober. I know not what is to be done with him or where he can get the money to spend for it must take quite a fortune to keep him up and my great fear is that he will come to an untimely end.

As Archy is writing to you it is needless for me to take any notice of the way that Alexdr has acted regarding the Mourris land but to say the leste of it I think that he has acted very deceitfully in that affair. I must again thank you for your kind and affectionate letter.

It has been a great comfort to me for I was in a very disponding mood when it came. You are labouring under a "very" great mistake if you think that you don't stand very high in my estimation but I do not think that I shall ever love any of you as I do Archy.

From your discription of the fair stranger that lately visited the metropolis I do not think that they have left a day too soon for "your" peace of mind but notwithstanding all their darling charms I think you have better wait and see whats to be had in the land of "Burns" and Mr Ferard accompany you on your visits to that gay stranger.

3rd
I feel grateful to you for the kind manner in which you express yr willingness to bring me the cloth for my skirt. There is nothing else that I require at present but as we have only flax mattresses at the station which is anything but comfortable for an invilide Catherine and myself would feel very much obliged if you would bring down a hair mattress. Perhaps you may have one of yr own not disposed of. If not you may get one cheap in Auckland. There is not such a thing to be had here. We have not heard but once from Canterbury since John left, and no letters by the last English mail. I am glad that you wrote to Uncle, poor old man. I do hope that he will not form such a foolish connection. I have no more news to send you and with our united love


I am my dear Donald always
Yr affectionate sister Catherine

Douglas tells me to send you his love and that you are to come soon. He is a very good boy and very obedient.

I feel thankful to you [crossed out]

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Catherine Hart (sister); Catherine Isabella McLean (sister-in-law), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0811 (71 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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