Object #1015560 from MS-Papers-0032-0814

4 pages written 13 Aug 1858 by an unknown author in Maraekakaho to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Alexander McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0814 (27 digitised items). Letters written from Australia, 1844-1849 and from Hawke's Bay (mainly Maraekakaho), 1857-1859. Includes one letter written by Donald to his brother Archy, 7 Feb 1846. The latter correspondence relates mainly to station matters

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)


[Letter from Archibald John McLean to Donald. Last page missing]
13 August 1858

Maraekakaho

My dear brother

I am happy to state that the nine days I have been here have improved my health greatly. I had a very severe attack of illness on the way down here and for 8 days after arrival but Alexander met me at the port and was very attentive. For the last 6 days I have been busy with McInnish making a garden and several other little jobs. I must say I am delighted with the place and with attention and hard work it will be made a splendid place. Of Alex has been very oppen and candit with me in everything and from what he states I am convinced he has done and is doing everything in his power for your interest, indeed from the little I have seen of his ways so far you and I have reason to be proud of him for none of us will ever understand land and stock

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English (MD)

equal to him besides the ways of the natives round him as well as his neighbours who all respect him. He has plowed a beautiful paddock under the hill above the house and sowed both wheat and oats. He also is plowing a lot of it for to sow grass and potatoes so that the fearful expense of this year will be done away with next year all but tea and sugar which is a heavy return of itself. He has finished a splendid stock yard. It equals is not in the whole country and fenced a good part of our side of the paddock. He has used up all the timber down here. Him and me were up at the bush two days ago seeing what timber there is there. He has got a large quantity split and ready but owing to the heavy rains here it is impossible to get it down for some time. The fencing of the paddock and woolshed will be the first thing we will commence to after we get the timber. The weather has been very unfavourable for lambing but the sheepheard says very few of yours are lost

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English (MD)

and they are lambing at present. Alexander would have told you that he sold the other station for £500. He is going to purchase about 140 acres of land round the house and along the river to secure the place in a fortnight or so when he gets his share of the money. I do believe he will do everything that is honourable for he tells me it is not our own cridit we have to maintain but yours in this country. We could make many shifts as he says but that would never do if it would incur any discredit on us or you. A is very sensible in his conversation. He says that he will have to go to Melbourne after shearing if possible to settle his affairs their. Their is not the least doubt but Alexander is honourable and I find that John is deeply in his debt and as he says himself he knows that his money went to keep his wife's family for many a day besides when he bought the vessel for John he gave him strick instructions to send his sisters money from the Isle of France which he says John never did. He has shown me papers to prove that he advanced and payed for that brig £1800 which money owing he says to the mismanagement of John and the Capt he had. He never recovered

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English (MD)

which from what John told me himself I have every reason to believe. He is grieved at the extravagance of the house owing to the carelessness of the woman but what can be done till we build the wool shed there. We will remove there till we build a house and live at half the expense. He says he will soon send you the return of the sheep, also all the coppies of accounts after I will get them made but from receipts etc. McLauchlin's young child died yesterday and will be buried today. It will commence a grand yard on this place where perhaps many more of us may rest in time. I am quite happy here as long as I am able to work. We have payed off the man that was fencing and will do all the rest ourselves. I am going to make them live on pigs instead of mutton which is much better and only costs a very little trouble. I now must inquire how my dear little nephew is. You can hardly believe how much I esteem the dear little fellow. I do hope and trust he is at school and paying attention to it. Often Alex and me talk about him in his Highland dress. Give him a kiss from me. My kind regards to Jessy and Aunt and tell her I am exceeding fond of her son. He is a fine lad. I wish to God McInnish had half his spirit poor fellow




English (MD)


[Letter from Archibald John McLean to Donald. Last page missing]
13 August 1858

Maraekakaho

My dear brother

I am happy to state that the nine days I have been here have improved my health greatly. I had a very severe attack of illness on the way down here and for 8 days after arrival but Alexander met me at the port and was very attentive. For the last 6 days I have been busy with McInnish making a garden and several other little jobs. I must say I am delighted with the place and with attention and hard work it will be made a splendid place. Of Alex has been very oppen and candit with me in everything and from what he states I am convinced he has done and is doing everything in his power for your interest, indeed from the little I have seen of his ways so far you and I have reason to be proud of him for none of us will ever understand land and stock equal to him besides the ways of the natives round him as well as his neighbours who all respect him. He has plowed a beautiful paddock under the hill above the house and sowed both wheat and oats. He also is plowing a lot of it for to sow grass and potatoes so that the fearful expense of this year will be done away with next year all but tea and sugar which is a heavy return of itself. He has finished a splendid stock yard. It equals is not in the whole country and fenced a good part of our side of the paddock. He has used up all the timber down here. Him and me were up at the bush two days ago seeing what timber there is there. He has got a large quantity split and ready but owing to the heavy rains here it is impossible to get it down for some time. The fencing of the paddock and woolshed will be the first thing we will commence to after we get the timber. The weather has been very unfavourable for lambing but the sheepheard says very few of yours are lost and they are lambing at present. Alexander would have told you that he sold the other station for £500. He is going to purchase about 140 acres of land round the house and along the river to secure the place in a fortnight or so when he gets his share of the money. I do believe he will do everything that is honourable for he tells me it is not our own cridit we have to maintain but yours in this country. We could make many shifts as he says but that would never do if it would incur any discredit on us or you. A is very sensible in his conversation. He says that he will have to go to Melbourne after shearing if possible to settle his affairs their. Their is not the least doubt but Alexander is honourable and I find that John is deeply in his debt and as he says himself he knows that his money went to keep his wife's family for many a day besides when he bought the vessel for John he gave him strick instructions to send his sisters money from the Isle of France which he says John never did. He has shown me papers to prove that he advanced and payed for that brig £1800 which money owing he says to the mismanagement of John and the Capt he had. He never recovered which from what John told me himself I have every reason to believe. He is grieved at the extravagance of the house owing to the carelessness of the woman but what can be done till we build the wool shed there. We will remove there till we build a house and live at half the expense. He says he will soon send you the return of the sheep, also all the coppies of accounts after I will get them made but from receipts etc. McLauchlin's young child died yesterday and will be buried today. It will commence a grand yard on this place where perhaps many more of us may rest in time. I am quite happy here as long as I am able to work. We have payed off the man that was fencing and will do all the rest ourselves. I am going to make them live on pigs instead of mutton which is much better and only costs a very little trouble. I now must inquire how my dear little nephew is. You can hardly believe how much I esteem the dear little fellow. I do hope and trust he is at school and paying attention to it. Often Alex and me talk about him in his Highland dress. Give him a kiss from me. My kind regards to Jessy and Aunt and tell her I am exceeding fond of her son. He is a fine lad. I wish to God McInnish had half his spirit poor fellow




Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Alexander McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0814 (27 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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