Object #1015491 from MS-Papers-0032-0311

4 pages written 8 Jul 1850 by Henry Halse in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items). 36 letters and memos written from Wanganui, Wellington and Auckland (some in Maori)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

8th. July 1850


(3 p.m.)
Dear Sir,

The regular correspondence has been forwarded to you by this day's post overland, with enclosures from Honi Ropiha and Rawiri.

On reflection, and when it was too late, even in emulation of an Irishman, to add a Post Script, embracing, if not the substance, an important part, of the last fortnight's proceedings, - I found that I had omitted to say that Mr. Morgan was satisfied with your intention to make enquiries about the land immediately outside the FitzRoy boundary at Waimakaiho; and that about a fortnight since Wiremu Ropiha came to Barracks when I was busy writing, and

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

said something about cultivating that same land. When I wished him to call again, he promised to do so, but to this time, I have seen nothing of him, and therefore suppose he has thought better of it.

Tamati Waka, I see, is coming in at the gate.

Enter Tamati Waka.

"How do you do, Hare!"

Hare. "How are you E Waka? Sit down."

Waka. "A word with you. The Waikatos are coming.

They are now at Tongaporutu, in numbers, 200, and will be here presently."

Hare. "Indeed!"

Waka. "Yes. But this is a whunga for the late Purangi, Punipi's mother. The coming may, in a way, not be a good one. A quantity of food is being purchased."

Hare. "Just so; and the Waikatos will some and eat it."

Exit Waka.

When this information reachees you, at

Page 3 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

the hands of the natives, like a rolling snowball, it will greatly increase in magnitude; and yet, in a careful comparison, I have found Europeans quite as bad in their exaggerated statements. During the time poor Harris was missing, false rumours were daily - almost hourly - brought into town, and always met with some believers, who, after a fruitless search, by some ingenious process, satisfied themselves that there must have been some truth in it, and so set others off on equally ridiculous speculations.

I do not see how the disputed land at Waiongona can effect Europeans, unless to advance their views of acquiring land, and that is not very likely.

Speaking of land, I fear this settlement will suffer materially if

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

the Company should be unable to satisfy the expected purchasers in next and the following ships. Even now, land is wanted by the new arrivals, and there is none for them, unless they go into the forest, which is objectionable to them.

Charles Hursthouse intends to come in the April ship, - at least so he wrote my brother; and said there would be several passengers for this place. When they come, what is to be done with them?

On dit Miss Gates is shortly to be Mrs. Percimal; when I hope my cottage will again be required.


Yours very truly (Signed)
H. Halse.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

8th. July 1850


(3 p.m.)
Dear Sir,

The regular correspondence has been forwarded to you by this day's post overland, with enclosures from Honi Ropiha and Rawiri.

On reflection, and when it was too late, even in emulation of an Irishman, to add a Post Script, embracing, if not the substance, an important part, of the last fortnight's proceedings, - I found that I had omitted to say that Mr. Morgan was satisfied with your intention to make enquiries about the land immediately outside the FitzRoy boundary at Waimakaiho; and that about a fortnight since Wiremu Ropiha came to Barracks when I was busy writing, and said something about cultivating that same land. When I wished him to call again, he promised to do so, but to this time, I have seen nothing of him, and therefore suppose he has thought better of it.

Tamati Waka, I see, is coming in at the gate.

Enter Tamati Waka.

"How do you do, Hare!"

Hare. "How are you E Waka? Sit down."

Waka. "A word with you. The Waikatos are coming.

They are now at Tongaporutu, in numbers, 200, and will be here presently."

Hare. "Indeed!"

Waka. "Yes. But this is a whunga for the late Purangi, Punipi's mother. The coming may, in a way, not be a good one. A quantity of food is being purchased."

Hare. "Just so; and the Waikatos will some and eat it."

Exit Waka.

When this information reachees you, at the hands of the natives, like a rolling snowball, it will greatly increase in magnitude; and yet, in a careful comparison, I have found Europeans quite as bad in their exaggerated statements. During the time poor Harris was missing, false rumours were daily - almost hourly - brought into town, and always met with some believers, who, after a fruitless search, by some ingenious process, satisfied themselves that there must have been some truth in it, and so set others off on equally ridiculous speculations.

I do not see how the disputed land at Waiongona can effect Europeans, unless to advance their views of acquiring land, and that is not very likely.

Speaking of land, I fear this settlement will suffer materially if the Company should be unable to satisfy the expected purchasers in next and the following ships. Even now, land is wanted by the new arrivals, and there is none for them, unless they go into the forest, which is objectionable to them.

Charles Hursthouse intends to come in the April ship, - at least so he wrote my brother; and said there would be several passengers for this place. When they come, what is to be done with them?

On dit Miss Gates is shortly to be Mrs. Percimal; when I hope my cottage will again be required.


Yours very truly (Signed)
H. Halse.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1015491). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments