Object #1015211 from MS-Papers-0032-0215

4 pages written 19 Jun 1845 by George Clarke in Auckland Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0215 (29 digitised items). 28 letters written from Auckland and Bay of Islands, 1844-1874. Piece-level inventory in folder (list excludes letters accessioned in 1969)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Auckland
July 19th. 1845.


Dear McLean,

I hear that a small vessel is leaving Manakau for Taranaki and as our communications are so uncertain I hazard the opportunity of giving you the news of the day.

Our troops have again been engaged with Heke and in the attempt to storm the Pa we met with severe loss without effecting the object. The Troops continued before the Pa and commenced their bombardment intending the following day to have made another attempt but the Rebels left the Pa in the night and fled to the Bush leaving behind them an immense quantity of provision their great guns and a great deal of their plunder from Kororareka

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

which our troops and the loyal natives took possession of. The Pa is destroyed and where the rebels have fled to cannot be accurately ascertained they must have suffered much in be now in great destitution wanting I expect both provision and ammunition. It is not known whether Heke is living or not.

Henry was severely wounded but I am thankful to say is doing very well. Mr. George and my son William have all taken their part in suppressing the Rebellion but have hitherto been unhurt. I hope the Natives will now see what a disastrous thing it is to them and their countrymen generally to quarrel unjustly with a great nation like England. I trust also it will be a lasting warning

Page 3 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

to our own countrymen they will see that we have to deal with a brave people who cannot be frightened like children I only wonder that they have not been more troublesome and I much wonder that the people of Taranaki with their mock demonstration have not been made to feel the vengeance of the natives. I am sure you will exert yourself in pointing out to both races the extreme folly of quarrelling with each other.

I hope this will find you all quiet and that you will strive to impress the native mind with the hopelessness of their case should they imitate Heke.


Yours very truly,
George Clarke.

English (ATL)

Auckland
July 19th. 1845.


Dear McLean,

I hear that a small vessel is leaving Manakau for Taranaki and as our communications are so uncertain I hazard the opportunity of giving you the news of the day.

Our troops have again been engaged with Heke and in the attempt to storm the Pa we met with severe loss without effecting the object. The Troops continued before the Pa and commenced their bombardment intending the following day to have made another attempt but the Rebels left the Pa in the night and fled to the Bush leaving behind them an immense quantity of provision their great guns and a great deal of their plunder from Kororareka which our troops and the loyal natives took possession of. The Pa is destroyed and where the rebels have fled to cannot be accurately ascertained they must have suffered much in be now in great destitution wanting I expect both provision and ammunition. It is not known whether Heke is living or not.

Henry was severely wounded but I am thankful to say is doing very well. Mr. George and my son William have all taken their part in suppressing the Rebellion but have hitherto been unhurt. I hope the Natives will now see what a disastrous thing it is to them and their countrymen generally to quarrel unjustly with a great nation like England. I trust also it will be a lasting warning to our own countrymen they will see that we have to deal with a brave people who cannot be frightened like children I only wonder that they have not been more troublesome and I much wonder that the people of Taranaki with their mock demonstration have not been made to feel the vengeance of the natives. I am sure you will exert yourself in pointing out to both races the extreme folly of quarrelling with each other.

I hope this will find you all quiet and that you will strive to impress the native mind with the hopelessness of their case should they imitate Heke.


Yours very truly,
George Clarke.

Part of:
Inward letters - George Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0215 (29 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1015211). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments