Object #1015064 from MS-Papers-0032-0013

5 pages written 26 Nov 1860 by Sir Donald McLean in Auckland Region

From: Secretary, Native Department - War in Taranaki and Waikato and King Movement, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0013 (26 digitised items). Includes lists of Maori killed at Mahoetahi 6 November 1860 and includes letters signed by Maori such as Tawhiao but penned in McLean's hand or by other government officials.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Auckland

26 Nov. 1860.



My dear General,

I regret exceedingly that a necessity should have arisen a such a critical time to deprive you of some of your effective force, but I am assured they will be sent back immediately after reinforcements arrive, or whenever it is ascertained that the Natives have abandonned the idea of attacking Auckland which they still threaten to do.

I am astonished that the Governor did not acknowledge the receipt of your despatches in reference to the Kaihihi expendition which was an exceedingly skilful and well conducted operation, indeed

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English (ATL)

I have heard the natives themselves talk of it up here as such. The assembly has not acquitted itself of a duty which was certainly due to yourself and the forces under your command I felt this and frequently spoke of it to individual members but they seemed so much taken up with their own affairs and held such extravagant ideas of what ought to be done that it was needless to expect anything from them in justification of those who were exposing their lives im their defence, however truth will prevail and I feel certain that what you have accomplished for New Zealand will form a bright page in its history with which your name will be associated.

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English (ATL)


The Mahoetahi affair has cooled the courage of the Maori but he is not as yet subdued, and he has such an inflated idea of his own prowess that one or two severe lessons must yet be taught before heyields to British rule and ascendency.

You will I trust excuse my writing with the utmost freedowm to a person of your age and experience when I take the liberty of saying that I trust you will not expose yourself as you have been doing as it would be a sad blow in connexion with this war if you met with any misfortune. It is true you are under the guidance of a good providence but that does not exempt one from taking care especially at your time of life, I really do not think that the friendly

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English (ATL)

Natives are of much use to you in the field and it would avoid confusion if only a few of them were taken with the troops as guides, I merely hint at this for your own consideration.

I am getting the cases of robbery perpretated on the out settlers adjusted by the chiefs, and recently I have had interviews with the Thames tribes who profess friendship so that if we are attacked by the Waikatos they are not likely to join.

I can assure you I have my hands full of work at present with but scanty encouragement from the assembly for all my services but when a person's duties are conscientiously discharged he need not care much about popular

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English (ATL)

assemblies.

The assembly wishes to have all power in Native Matters while asking England for troops and funds to carry on an expensive war. I should like to see the Imperial Government take the question entirely into its own hands until matters are finally settled, but I shall not trouble you with the political phases of the question until I again have the pleasure of seeing you.

I remain My dear General
Yours sincerely (Sd.)
Donald McLean.

English (ATL)

Auckland

26 Nov. 1860.



My dear General,

I regret exceedingly that a necessity should have arisen a such a critical time to deprive you of some of your effective force, but I am assured they will be sent back immediately after reinforcements arrive, or whenever it is ascertained that the Natives have abandonned the idea of attacking Auckland which they still threaten to do.

I am astonished that the Governor did not acknowledge the receipt of your despatches in reference to the Kaihihi expendition which was an exceedingly skilful and well conducted operation, indeed I have heard the natives themselves talk of it up here as such. The assembly has not acquitted itself of a duty which was certainly due to yourself and the forces under your command I felt this and frequently spoke of it to individual members but they seemed so much taken up with their own affairs and held such extravagant ideas of what ought to be done that it was needless to expect anything from them in justification of those who were exposing their lives im their defence, however truth will prevail and I feel certain that what you have accomplished for New Zealand will form a bright page in its history with which your name will be associated.

The Mahoetahi affair has cooled the courage of the Maori but he is not as yet subdued, and he has such an inflated idea of his own prowess that one or two severe lessons must yet be taught before heyields to British rule and ascendency.

You will I trust excuse my writing with the utmost freedowm to a person of your age and experience when I take the liberty of saying that I trust you will not expose yourself as you have been doing as it would be a sad blow in connexion with this war if you met with any misfortune. It is true you are under the guidance of a good providence but that does not exempt one from taking care especially at your time of life, I really do not think that the friendly Natives are of much use to you in the field and it would avoid confusion if only a few of them were taken with the troops as guides, I merely hint at this for your own consideration.

I am getting the cases of robbery perpretated on the out settlers adjusted by the chiefs, and recently I have had interviews with the Thames tribes who profess friendship so that if we are attacked by the Waikatos they are not likely to join.

I can assure you I have my hands full of work at present with but scanty encouragement from the assembly for all my services but when a person's duties are conscientiously discharged he need not care much about popular assemblies.

The assembly wishes to have all power in Native Matters while asking England for troops and funds to carry on an expensive war. I should like to see the Imperial Government take the question entirely into its own hands until matters are finally settled, but I shall not trouble you with the political phases of the question until I again have the pleasure of seeing you.

I remain My dear General
Yours sincerely (Sd.)
Donald McLean.

Part of:
Secretary, Native Department - War in Taranaki and Waikato and King Movement, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0013 (26 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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