Object #1015039 from MS-Papers-0032-0231

4 pages written 23 Apr 1846 by W E Cormack in Auckland Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - W E Cormack, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0231 (11 digitised items). 11 letters and memos written from Auckland & Taranaki, 1844-1849; London, Aug 1850. Memo dated 16 Jul 1844 re land at Waipa and Waikato

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Auckland

23rd. April, 1846



Dear MacLean,

Your letter of 26th. August last was received by me in October in the country. I have not been in Auckland since until the present time. It has given me great pleasure to learn that your residence at Taranaki has been both agreable and serviceable to yourself, your fellow countrymen and the natives. A few months ago, I, amongst others, flattered myself that there was a dawn that the troubles of New Zealand would gradually cease; but of late matters, in consequence of the altered relations of the Company with the Government, bear a different aspect. I am sick of New Zealand Politics. It is pretty evident that the country will be the svene of strife and bloodshed for many years; and that infliction is to exist to gratify bigotted ignorance and a desire to oppress.

The greatest enemy the late Governor had in the world was that sycophant Clarke - or Creeping Jesus. The country congratulates itself upon its riddance of him. I was sorry for Captain FitzRoy - that he countenanced such an ignorant mischievous character. But he did so, to the mortification and alienation of many who were friendly disposed towards him. It was his misfortune.

''General Heki'' has, we are led to believe, about six hundred fighting armed men with him now inclusive of about one hundred mounted Horsemen. So says ''Creeping Jesus'' who says he saw them a few days since, and reports from others are similar. All the Natives in those parts seem to be the same towards the Europeans, excepting that they seem to view their fighting with the soldiers in the light of sport. It is impossible to forsee into what catastrophe the

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English (ATL)

authorities (for Government it is not) will plunge us - if they do not call for the common sense of all Europeans in the country - to aid them in their decisions.

I mean to pursue my way in the country as I have done. We have some influence with the natives in country parts: Government! has none. The question now paramount to every, in my opinion, is the mode by which we are to get control over the waste lands. It might be adjusted and settled, I think, without bloodshed and waste of John Bull's money if common sense and justice governed the public measures.

Of the native character, I think less than I did. Force only will compel some of then to act fairly towards us.

I am pursuing my spar operations at Mangapona - only just now. I expect another packet ship shortly to take home my first cargo. No reliance is to be placed in agreements with Natives for hauling them out unless it at the moment suits their interests to do it; and we have no power to compel them to fulfil their engagments. I have however one native party and one of Europeans dragging out.

Debentures have disappeared and trade in Auckland is now wholesome. Kaipara is now a busy place with spar and quarring. If the ships at present leading and to load them got out and in

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English (ATL)

safe, that place will affard much employment to Natives and Europeans.

Having heard nothing from Cook's Straits for nearly two months, we are very anxious to know what the belligerents are about.

It is uncertain whether Doctor Martin returns. Brown intends to come back. Kororareka is being revived. Auckland has altered very little since you left it. All Macdonald's old friends still assemble at the Caledonian.

It seems strange that dire experience has not taught the Company to alter theirspirit of colonization. However I probably say this prematurely, for I have not learnt much of them lately. The pound and two pound an acre system is truly infamous humbug. Who but must pity the members constituting the company.


I remain, dear MacLean, Always very truly yours,
W.E. Cormack.

English (ATL)

Auckland

23rd. April, 1846



Dear MacLean,

Your letter of 26th. August last was received by me in October in the country. I have not been in Auckland since until the present time. It has given me great pleasure to learn that your residence at Taranaki has been both agreable and serviceable to yourself, your fellow countrymen and the natives. A few months ago, I, amongst others, flattered myself that there was a dawn that the troubles of New Zealand would gradually cease; but of late matters, in consequence of the altered relations of the Company with the Government, bear a different aspect. I am sick of New Zealand Politics. It is pretty evident that the country will be the svene of strife and bloodshed for many years; and that infliction is to exist to gratify bigotted ignorance and a desire to oppress.

The greatest enemy the late Governor had in the world was that sycophant Clarke - or Creeping Jesus. The country congratulates itself upon its riddance of him. I was sorry for Captain FitzRoy - that he countenanced such an ignorant mischievous character. But he did so, to the mortification and alienation of many who were friendly disposed towards him. It was his misfortune.

''General Heki'' has, we are led to believe, about six hundred fighting armed men with him now inclusive of about one hundred mounted Horsemen. So says ''Creeping Jesus'' who says he saw them a few days since, and reports from others are similar. All the Natives in those parts seem to be the same towards the Europeans, excepting that they seem to view their fighting with the soldiers in the light of sport. It is impossible to forsee into what catastrophe the authorities (for Government it is not) will plunge us - if they do not call for the common sense of all Europeans in the country - to aid them in their decisions.

I mean to pursue my way in the country as I have done. We have some influence with the natives in country parts: Government! has none. The question now paramount to every, in my opinion, is the mode by which we are to get control over the waste lands. It might be adjusted and settled, I think, without bloodshed and waste of John Bull's money if common sense and justice governed the public measures.

Of the native character, I think less than I did. Force only will compel some of then to act fairly towards us.

I am pursuing my spar operations at Mangapona - only just now. I expect another packet ship shortly to take home my first cargo. No reliance is to be placed in agreements with Natives for hauling them out unless it at the moment suits their interests to do it; and we have no power to compel them to fulfil their engagments. I have however one native party and one of Europeans dragging out.

Debentures have disappeared and trade in Auckland is now wholesome. Kaipara is now a busy place with spar and quarring. If the ships at present leading and to load them got out and in safe, that place will affard much employment to Natives and Europeans.

Having heard nothing from Cook's Straits for nearly two months, we are very anxious to know what the belligerents are about.

It is uncertain whether Doctor Martin returns. Brown intends to come back. Kororareka is being revived. Auckland has altered very little since you left it. All Macdonald's old friends still assemble at the Caledonian.

It seems strange that dire experience has not taught the Company to alter theirspirit of colonization. However I probably say this prematurely, for I have not learnt much of them lately. The pound and two pound an acre system is truly infamous humbug. Who but must pity the members constituting the company.


I remain, dear MacLean, Always very truly yours,
W.E. Cormack.

Part of:
Inward letters - W E Cormack, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0231 (11 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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