Object #1014700 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

4 pages written 5 Feb 1870 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

5 February 1870

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

It is some time since I wrote you. I did not care to bother you with any letters well knowing that you have plenty to do and as I had no news of any importance to write about silence was best altho my heart was often with you and near you any time I went to Napier and that is but seldom. I missed you more than I can here state, however there is one source of great joy and comfort to me in the safe arrival of dear Douglas in the good charge of the worthy and excellent Mr T and his lady and I feel proud and pleased to find that the dear boy esteems his kindness so much. I am certainly pleased to see that he went to visit the towns of his

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English (MD)

forefathers in Tyree. The family name will be cherished for many generations by the warm hearted islanders, altho none of kin there remains.

I was rejoiced to see by yesterday's Herald that in spite of all opposition papers that their was a good victory over the Haw Haws and I hope and trust it may be final. God knows with his help if you are left alone you will finish this miserable war that I am certain of and former prediction makes me quite easy about it and many others think the same. The old lady at Canterburys words are daily coming true. Of course Condie will keep you posted up about the station matters. Twigg is commencing flax dressing at Patami [Petane?] on the Condie's run for which they pay the Condie's £70 a year. The flax here on your land is very clelached [clatched] and not easy to get at but I am determined to make an effort in a short time

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English (MD)

to try it on a small scale at first. I colected all the best information to make shure work before commencing. I was up at the Carlyon's last week seeing them about flax & I left them overjoyed. He said he would owe me a silver service the best ever came to New Zealand if he was successful with the flax as I was the first to oppen his eyes about it. The silver service may be taken for what it is worth but he certainly was very much pleased and thanked me with great cordiality. The few plants of flax I planted are doing well. I had the finest fruit here this year in Hawke's Bay. The apples are splendid & the grass has done wonders. The meat I preserved turned out much better than the boiling down meat but I could not get a market for it to make it pay however I will see this incoming winter. Chambers has commenced the same way as I did and has got the man I had with him. I now hope you will allow Douglas to come to this healthy spot till he will geather good strength after the voyage.

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English (MD)

I live in the hope to see him taking an interest in his father's affairs that strangers will never do. It is the onley hope I have to live for to have him here so that I will plant all I can about the place in him and I am certain he will become a good colonist and perhaps in time a great statesman. Why should he try anything ealse when there is so much here for him to attend to and learn. O, my dear D. I am so pleased he has turned out so well in the beginning. His note to me made me overjoyed. We are all well here at preasant and Alick is doing well for some time and taking a great deal of interest about the place. I long to see you for an hour or two.


Your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

5 February 1870

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

It is some time since I wrote you. I did not care to bother you with any letters well knowing that you have plenty to do and as I had no news of any importance to write about silence was best altho my heart was often with you and near you any time I went to Napier and that is but seldom. I missed you more than I can here state, however there is one source of great joy and comfort to me in the safe arrival of dear Douglas in the good charge of the worthy and excellent Mr T and his lady and I feel proud and pleased to find that the dear boy esteems his kindness so much. I am certainly pleased to see that he went to visit the towns of his forefathers in Tyree. The family name will be cherished for many generations by the warm hearted islanders, altho none of kin there remains.

I was rejoiced to see by yesterday's Herald that in spite of all opposition papers that their was a good victory over the Haw Haws and I hope and trust it may be final. God knows with his help if you are left alone you will finish this miserable war that I am certain of and former prediction makes me quite easy about it and many others think the same. The old lady at Canterburys words are daily coming true. Of course Condie will keep you posted up about the station matters. Twigg is commencing flax dressing at Patami [Petane?] on the Condie's run for which they pay the Condie's £70 a year. The flax here on your land is very clelached [clatched] and not easy to get at but I am determined to make an effort in a short time to try it on a small scale at first. I colected all the best information to make shure work before commencing. I was up at the Carlyon's last week seeing them about flax & I left them overjoyed. He said he would owe me a silver service the best ever came to New Zealand if he was successful with the flax as I was the first to oppen his eyes about it. The silver service may be taken for what it is worth but he certainly was very much pleased and thanked me with great cordiality. The few plants of flax I planted are doing well. I had the finest fruit here this year in Hawke's Bay. The apples are splendid & the grass has done wonders. The meat I preserved turned out much better than the boiling down meat but I could not get a market for it to make it pay however I will see this incoming winter. Chambers has commenced the same way as I did and has got the man I had with him. I now hope you will allow Douglas to come to this healthy spot till he will geather good strength after the voyage. I live in the hope to see him taking an interest in his father's affairs that strangers will never do. It is the onley hope I have to live for to have him here so that I will plant all I can about the place in him and I am certain he will become a good colonist and perhaps in time a great statesman. Why should he try anything ealse when there is so much here for him to attend to and learn. O, my dear D. I am so pleased he has turned out so well in the beginning. His note to me made me overjoyed. We are all well here at preasant and Alick is doing well for some time and taking a great deal of interest about the place. I long to see you for an hour or two.


Your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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