Object #1014597 from MS-Papers-0032-0540

3 pages written 19 Jan 1855 by John Rogan in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items). 40 letters written from Awakino, Mokau, New Plymouth, Takatuhi, Whangaroa, Waingohu, Tokatoka (Kaipara), Whakaturai, Auckland, Coromandel, & Sydney (Sep 1858)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

of that part of the Block, and the grass land spoken of by Ta Kerei is a delusion.

I had no difficulty in inducing Ta Kerei to agree to the payment of £300 to the Ngatirarua; but his people opposed it strongly; and he, in a fit of passion, destroyed a letter he had written to you consenting to the proposal.

I have seen the natives along the coast, relative to the Ngatiama question; and find they are all unanimous in their opposition to the sale of this land; and they threatened anyone who may attempt a survey of the land. I called twice at the Waitara for letters from W. King and Kakariki; and owing to King's absence at Katatore's pa, I have not yet succeeded in obtaining them. I regret very much the present determination of the natives to oppose the offer, because I believe the acquisition of it to be most material to New Plymouth, as Mokau.

Taranaki seems to be in the same troubled state as ever. The natives have erected strong pas in almost every little settlement in the district; which appears to me to argue that they at least expect something more general in the way of attack. Major Nugent has endeavoured to restore peace, but the friends of Rawiri still persis in blood as payment, although they are evidently afraid to strike the blow. How long this state of things is going to last, it is difficult to say; and since the unsuspected attack of Ngatiruanui on, Ihaia, we have given over all speculation as to the probable result. A very strong feeling in favour of soldiers is entertained by the majority of the settlers; and memorials have been forwarded by the Superintendent to Auckland, praying for protection.

I have seen the hua natives, and made an arrengement to recommence the survey there next week. I have, however, no hope of completing this work for a long time, owing principally to the natives adhering to their respective claims to

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English (ATL)

the land, as it stood originally; and it is in most cases impossible to survey the different allotments so as to make them come to certain Maori landmarks. I hinted to them at the same time that should they continue to interrupt me in the survey as they had done hitherto, it is most probable you will send me instructions to proceed to some other districts.

I am, my dear Sir,
Yours, etc., etc., etc., (Signed)
J. Rogan.
P.S. I shall write to you more fully on the Ngatiama question when I receive letters from Waitara To:- Donald McLean

English (ATL)

Letter from J. Rogan, to Donald McLean, dated 19th. January 1855.

COPY. New Plymouth
19th. January 1855.


My dear Sir,

I reached here on Saturday last, after settling with Ta Kerei and his tribe, for the Taumata Mairi Block. The survey of another piece of land at Awakino has been proceeded with, as far inland as we could possibly get in an canoe. I have not yet protracted the survey,(Wharepu being still in the carpenter's hands); but I believe it will not be more than 15 or 16,000 acres. The land for the most part, is very mountainous and rugged. There are about 3,000 acres of good fern and bush land on the banks of the river, but it is separated from the sea coast by large ranges of hills, and can only be approached by way of Mokau inland at Motukaianu, which is not to be purchased yet. The natives have cut off about 1000 acres of that part of the Block, and the grass land spoken of by Ta Kerei is a delusion.

I had no difficulty in inducing Ta Kerei to agree to the payment of £300 to the Ngatirarua; but his people opposed it strongly; and he, in a fit of passion, destroyed a letter he had written to you consenting to the proposal.

I have seen the natives along the coast, relative to the Ngatiama question; and find they are all unanimous in their opposition to the sale of this land; and they threatened anyone who may attempt a survey of the land. I called twice at the Waitara for letters from W. King and Kakariki; and owing to King's absence at Katatore's pa, I have not yet succeeded in obtaining them. I regret very much the present determination of the natives to oppose the offer, because I believe the acquisition of it to be most material to New Plymouth, as Mokau.

Taranaki seems to be in the same troubled state as ever. The natives have erected strong pas in almost every little settlement in the district; which appears to me to argue that they at least expect something more general in the way of attack. Major Nugent has endeavoured to restore peace, but the friends of Rawiri still persis in blood as payment, although they are evidently afraid to strike the blow. How long this state of things is going to last, it is difficult to say; and since the unsuspected attack of Ngatiruanui on, Ihaia, we have given over all speculation as to the probable result. A very strong feeling in favour of soldiers is entertained by the majority of the settlers; and memorials have been forwarded by the Superintendent to Auckland, praying for protection.

I have seen the hua natives, and made an arrengement to recommence the survey there next week. I have, however, no hope of completing this work for a long time, owing principally to the natives adhering to their respective claims to the land, as it stood originally; and it is in most cases impossible to survey the different allotments so as to make them come to certain Maori landmarks. I hinted to them at the same time that should they continue to interrupt me in the survey as they had done hitherto, it is most probable you will send me instructions to proceed to some other districts.

I am, my dear Sir,
Yours, etc., etc., etc., (Signed)
J. Rogan.
P.S. I shall write to you more fully on the Ngatiama question when I receive letters from Waitara To:- Donald McLean

Part of:
Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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