Object #1014449 from MS-Papers-0032-0311

5 pages written 2 Sep 1850 by Henry Halse in Ngamotu to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items). 36 letters and memos written from Wanganui, Wellington and Auckland (some in Maori)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

PRIVATE. Ngamotu

September 2nd. 1850.



Dear Sir,

Fenning is working at, or near, Waitotara; and is expected back here shortly, when I will see him, and do as you desire.

The red pine board cannot be had here under 3 months. For this reason, Mr. Broadmore is the only person known to have a tree of the kind, which will burn out the size required; and he is engaged cutting white pine with all the assistance he can get for a limited period.

No opportunity has offered to Mokau, since you desired me to send some seed potatoes to Mr. Snachenberg nor can I hear of one likely to offer.

I have received £2 from Hakopa, and the balance is to be paid in the course of this month.

I am afraid your

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English (ATL)

duties have caused you to overlook Mr. Smart's business relative to the land of which he was deprivedby the Fitz Roy arrangements. Mr. Smart is anxious to hear from you on the subject.

Te Ngahuru told me last Saturday that he had removed Wiremu te Ha from Major Lloyd's section at Omata, and that the only pakeha was E Waka, who had no right there whatever.

The dispute mentioned in my report as trifling, might, but for the intervention of the Police, have terminated in a different manner. The xase was as follows.

Wills sold Wiriha a bullock chain, received payment for it, and subsequently drew a load of potatoes into Town, and advanced 2/- for some iron work for the same native, amounting in the whole to 10/-

The money was applied for. The native said he had none; but as soon as he received payment from Cowling, for whom he had been working, he would discharge the debt. This very reasonable promise was not sufficient for Mr. Wills; who must needs take the law into his own hands by seizing the bullock chain until the debt was paid. I wrote a note to Mr. Wills, and was glad to hear the chain had been restored to the owner.

I should tell you that I reported this seizure to Captain King, and communicated with Wells, as ordered.

I find Hakopa useful, and if he continues to exert himself in the good cause, you will have no occasion to regret your election, Tamati Waka has not been quite so punctual in his attendance here since Hakopa's return. Perhaps he may be staying with Rawiri, who is much cut up about the loss of his child.

I hear Captain Campbell and Mr. Hunter start next Wednesday for Wanganui.

It is generally supposed here that the New Zealand Company cannot exist much longer, and that something definite will be known by the next arrival. Should they retire

Page 3 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

from the field, do you think New Plymouth will rise? or will it resume its former state of stagnation? I have land, and would thank you for any private information for my guidance as to whether I should sell or retain it. Scrip is now worth 12/- per acre.

Your tenant, Mr. Gudgeon, proves to be a good workman. He has just finished two picture frames for the Governor-in-Chief, and they are certainly very creditable productions. The grounds about the house are much improved, and I believe he intends to lay the whole down in grass.

Hoping you are well,


I remain, Sir, Yours faithfully (Signed)
H. Halse.

P.S. Medland is here for the first time since the 8th. of last month, and is still unfit for duty.

To:- D. McLean Esq.

Page 4 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

MEMO.
Three of the men, Heale, Johnson and Stewart, and I have no doubt, the rest - were they present - would join with them, wish, me to ask whether you can get them allowed great coats. I promised to do so, without holding out the least hope of a favourable reply. Still, as they, (through Tom Heale) are of the opinion that such an allowance is usual in Auckland, it will be satisfactory to them to hear from you that such is not allowed.

It is time they were

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

allowed more, but will they be allowed a second time?

I understand from Mr. Leach that great coats were once allowed to the Police in Auckland, but he does not think such an expense would be again sanctioned, particularly now that the Winter is over.

12th. inst. Post Office. (Signed)
H.H.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

PRIVATE. Ngamotu

September 2nd. 1850.



Dear Sir,

Fenning is working at, or near, Waitotara; and is expected back here shortly, when I will see him, and do as you desire.

The red pine board cannot be had here under 3 months. For this reason, Mr. Broadmore is the only person known to have a tree of the kind, which will burn out the size required; and he is engaged cutting white pine with all the assistance he can get for a limited period.

No opportunity has offered to Mokau, since you desired me to send some seed potatoes to Mr. Snachenberg nor can I hear of one likely to offer.

I have received £2 from Hakopa, and the balance is to be paid in the course of this month.

I am afraid your duties have caused you to overlook Mr. Smart's business relative to the land of which he was deprivedby the Fitz Roy arrangements. Mr. Smart is anxious to hear from you on the subject.

Te Ngahuru told me last Saturday that he had removed Wiremu te Ha from Major Lloyd's section at Omata, and that the only pakeha was E Waka, who had no right there whatever.

The dispute mentioned in my report as trifling, might, but for the intervention of the Police, have terminated in a different manner. The xase was as follows.

Wills sold Wiriha a bullock chain, received payment for it, and subsequently drew a load of potatoes into Town, and advanced 2/- for some iron work for the same native, amounting in the whole to 10/-

The money was applied for. The native said he had none; but as soon as he received payment from Cowling, for whom he had been working, he would discharge the debt. This very reasonable promise was not sufficient for Mr. Wills; who must needs take the law into his own hands by seizing the bullock chain until the debt was paid. I wrote a note to Mr. Wills, and was glad to hear the chain had been restored to the owner.

I should tell you that I reported this seizure to Captain King, and communicated with Wells, as ordered.

I find Hakopa useful, and if he continues to exert himself in the good cause, you will have no occasion to regret your election, Tamati Waka has not been quite so punctual in his attendance here since Hakopa's return. Perhaps he may be staying with Rawiri, who is much cut up about the loss of his child.

I hear Captain Campbell and Mr. Hunter start next Wednesday for Wanganui.

It is generally supposed here that the New Zealand Company cannot exist much longer, and that something definite will be known by the next arrival. Should they retire from the field, do you think New Plymouth will rise? or will it resume its former state of stagnation? I have land, and would thank you for any private information for my guidance as to whether I should sell or retain it. Scrip is now worth 12/- per acre.

Your tenant, Mr. Gudgeon, proves to be a good workman. He has just finished two picture frames for the Governor-in-Chief, and they are certainly very creditable productions. The grounds about the house are much improved, and I believe he intends to lay the whole down in grass.

Hoping you are well,


I remain, Sir, Yours faithfully (Signed)
H. Halse.

P.S. Medland is here for the first time since the 8th. of last month, and is still unfit for duty.

To:- D. McLean Esq. MEMO.
Three of the men, Heale, Johnson and Stewart, and I have no doubt, the rest - were they present - would join with them, wish, me to ask whether you can get them allowed great coats. I promised to do so, without holding out the least hope of a favourable reply. Still, as they, (through Tom Heale) are of the opinion that such an allowance is usual in Auckland, it will be satisfactory to them to hear from you that such is not allowed.

It is time they were allowed more, but will they be allowed a second time?

I understand from Mr. Leach that great coats were once allowed to the Police in Auckland, but he does not think such an expense would be again sanctioned, particularly now that the Winter is over.

12th. inst. Post Office. (Signed)
H.H.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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