Object #1014161 from MS-Papers-0032-0817

5 pages written 9 Jul 1861 by Archibald John McLean in Maraekakaho to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items). Letters written on board ship or from various ports, 1847-1858 prior to his arrival in New Zealand in mid-1858. From then on the letters are almost all written from Maraekakaho about station matters.

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

9 July 1861

Maraekakaho

My dear Donald

I hope you have received my last letter and that I will soon have an answer or the gratification of seeing yourself soon. Report states you are to be here by the 'Lord Ashley' with Gen. Cameron. If so I will be made very happy as I want to see you very much indeed. It will be needless for me to gave you a detailed account in this letter if we are to have you here so soon. We had a letter from Catherine and she states that up to the 18th ult there was no account of Alex. I expect the bad winter has gaven them a great deal of trouble driving sheep so far. I am astonished that Condie has not written eighrer [either]. I hope and trust nothing

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English (MD)

serious has happened them. Poor Catherine seems quite disapointed at her Canterbury trip. She does not seem to like the company she is with much. I do hope and trust altho the feature of things look black among the natives in this island at preasant that we will not have any more war. I had some of the chiefs our neighbours, old Harrawerra, and others here today making a demand of £30 and three bags of sugar for payment for rent for the plains saying if I did not gave it then they would get it from plenty others but that they would rather have us there than strangers if we gave them what was fair. I did all I could to smooth him of[f] but he came to the conclution that I must go with him tommorrow to Mr Alex and make some arrangement with him as he says they had a runanga among themselves and they say they will not wait my brother Alex coming and all I can tell them will not make them believe he is coming back and they say he was always putting them off and they will not be put off any longer. I told him as they wanted the sugar for a feast at the new mill that if he gave me a receipt for it as part payment that I would gave him three bags of 50lb each but as to the £30 I would not gave him till I would find out how much my brother had promised them and how much he had hitherto payed them, however please God tommorrow I will go to our kind friend Alex and take his advice on the

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English (MD)

subject. I will try and act in the most prudent manner and leave you to judge when we meet. We had very bad weather here almost continual ruin which is keeping us back in our plowing. Things are going on very smooth but rather slow but perhaps when we meet we will find ways to quicken the motions of some people. The extra sheepherd that was left here by Alex came to the conclution as their was so little for him to do that he would leave for a time and should we want him again he would come back therefore I kept the £40 per annum man in his place for a while longer so he milches the cows and the boy drives the bullocks to the plow and as I engaged this man I can get him to do any work I want without any trouble or demure. Catherine makes haggis almost out every sheep we kill and if it was not for the dreadful anoyance

Page 4 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

of travelers she could dispense with the cook but really altho there is not half the number now their used to be there is far to many as yet and it would be perfect drugery for to be attending them and keep other things in their place. I will not say any more on that here. I wish if you receive this before you come down you will bring me 2 ounces of blue gum seed if you can get it cheap. It is 5/ an ounce here. Danvers made about £70 of his blue gum plants. I have in now upwards of 700 and all doing well. Their was about 200 died and if you could get a few cones pine seed or any other kind of tree seed among your friends bring them for in time they will make the place work well and make it valuable and I will not spare

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

any pains in putting them in. There is one thing I was very anxious to get made this year before shearing that is a wool lever. I find that the spades pressing destroys the fleeces very much and all those that press their wool with a lever command a penny a lb more for there wool. At home there is a man here now with myself and I think we could put it up for about £12. It is most esential for it saves labour and time. I was obligded to let Rich have another draft of wethers for he said Alex told him to get them. He got 119 and I told him he could not have them for 18/. He said that Alex and he would settle saying he would gave from a pound to thirty shillings if you would be displeased. So on those terms I let them go so the money is in his hand ready for you at any time. If the country was only more in a settled state we would have more heart to go on improving. Pray when you do come to bring Douglas for his Aunt is very desirous to see him. Hoping to see you soon.


I remain your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

9 July 1861

Maraekakaho

My dear Donald

I hope you have received my last letter and that I will soon have an answer or the gratification of seeing yourself soon. Report states you are to be here by the 'Lord Ashley' with Gen. Cameron. If so I will be made very happy as I want to see you very much indeed. It will be needless for me to gave you a detailed account in this letter if we are to have you here so soon. We had a letter from Catherine and she states that up to the 18th ult there was no account of Alex. I expect the bad winter has gaven them a great deal of trouble driving sheep so far. I am astonished that Condie has not written eighrer [either]. I hope and trust nothing serious has happened them. Poor Catherine seems quite disapointed at her Canterbury trip. She does not seem to like the company she is with much. I do hope and trust altho the feature of things look black among the natives in this island at preasant that we will not have any more war. I had some of the chiefs our neighbours, old Harrawerra, and others here today making a demand of £30 and three bags of sugar for payment for rent for the plains saying if I did not gave it then they would get it from plenty others but that they would rather have us there than strangers if we gave them what was fair. I did all I could to smooth him of[f] but he came to the conclution that I must go with him tommorrow to Mr Alex and make some arrangement with him as he says they had a runanga among themselves and they say they will not wait my brother Alex coming and all I can tell them will not make them believe he is coming back and they say he was always putting them off and they will not be put off any longer. I told him as they wanted the sugar for a feast at the new mill that if he gave me a receipt for it as part payment that I would gave him three bags of 50lb each but as to the £30 I would not gave him till I would find out how much my brother had promised them and how much he had hitherto payed them, however please God tommorrow I will go to our kind friend Alex and take his advice on the subject. I will try and act in the most prudent manner and leave you to judge when we meet. We had very bad weather here almost continual ruin which is keeping us back in our plowing. Things are going on very smooth but rather slow but perhaps when we meet we will find ways to quicken the motions of some people. The extra sheepherd that was left here by Alex came to the conclution as their was so little for him to do that he would leave for a time and should we want him again he would come back therefore I kept the £40 per annum man in his place for a while longer so he milches the cows and the boy drives the bullocks to the plow and as I engaged this man I can get him to do any work I want without any trouble or demure. Catherine makes haggis almost out every sheep we kill and if it was not for the dreadful anoyance of travelers she could dispense with the cook but really altho there is not half the number now their used to be there is far to many as yet and it would be perfect drugery for to be attending them and keep other things in their place. I will not say any more on that here. I wish if you receive this before you come down you will bring me 2 ounces of blue gum seed if you can get it cheap. It is 5/ an ounce here. Danvers made about £70 of his blue gum plants. I have in now upwards of 700 and all doing well. Their was about 200 died and if you could get a few cones pine seed or any other kind of tree seed among your friends bring them for in time they will make the place work well and make it valuable and I will not spare any pains in putting them in. There is one thing I was very anxious to get made this year before shearing that is a wool lever. I find that the spades pressing destroys the fleeces very much and all those that press their wool with a lever command a penny a lb more for there wool. At home there is a man here now with myself and I think we could put it up for about £12. It is most esential for it saves labour and time. I was obligded to let Rich have another draft of wethers for he said Alex told him to get them. He got 119 and I told him he could not have them for 18/. He said that Alex and he would settle saying he would gave from a pound to thirty shillings if you would be displeased. So on those terms I let them go so the money is in his hand ready for you at any time. If the country was only more in a settled state we would have more heart to go on improving. Pray when you do come to bring Douglas for his Aunt is very desirous to see him. Hoping to see you soon.


I remain your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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