Object #1013903 from MS-Papers-0032-0123

3 pages written 22 Jan 1848 by Sir Donald McLean

From: Papers relating to provincial affairs - Taranaki. Inspector of police, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0123 (71 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

COPY

(N.B.) The following seems to be only part, and some of it seems to be missing.

Claims Taranaki had.

It is a fact worthy of observation that the Waikatos, in returning their conquered enemies to this district from which they were captured, without any recognised stipulation or condition respecting their lands, excepting a formal understanding or advice emanating from the Missionaries, who were instrumental in returning them, that they should occupy their own lands exclusively, - did thereby acquire the same right of property that they had forfeited, when subject to the Waikatos. It does not, however, appear, - neither is it probable that the Waikatos granted the same privilege to the natives who abandoned the district from fear of their incursions. Their clemency in this respect only extended to those with whom they became associated and familiar, by the circumstance of being conquered; and family connections arising from intercourse with the conquered females. Indeed, some of the Chiefs, in warm terms, have openly expressed their

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English (ATL)

determination to resist any attempt on the part of the Southern Ngatiawas to return to his district. One of them in particular, who returned the first native to this district, named Taonui, who possesses considerable influence, used a very emphatic expression, when talking with me one day on the subject; which was, -"when the bird once deserts its nest, it never again returns to it." Such is the case with the Ngatiawa. They are quiet now where they are. Let them stop there, and let those I have returned also remain quietly in their lands.

Te Pakeru remarked once, when speaking to Katatori, - "I have returned to your land, not that you should annoy the Europeans, but live in peace with them." And so far have the Waikatos either considered them selves pledged to maintain their faith with these people to occupy the district undisturbed from their having returned with a promise to enjoy their land again or from a threat to occupy a country that it might cause some difficulty to retain peaceably, or from what is still more probable, a superstitious fear that their doing so would subject them to the vengeance of the reputed witches and priest-craft, or Maketu natives; which his district has been reputed to possess, and they did not choose to reside there. Such, however, is the present state of the Waikato claim, that when advanced, or spoken of, it is only mentioned in relation to their dead relatives, who were lost in the wars here; which, according to their custom, substantiates a claim frequently recognised

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English (ATL)

and paid for by Europeans in many parts of the Island; where such have been advanced by the natives, - as many Waikato natives of Chieftain descent, are now residing in this district, with women of the Ngatiawa; from whom they admit their claims are derived; and never have they in any instance applied to me for compensation for land in the district, when about to be disposed of; and when I have made a point of enquiring if they had any claim to urge, they invariably replied in the negative; stating that their claims might descend to their children, but that their only control was from their female connections.

(Signed)
Donald McLean.
January 22nd, 1848.

English (ATL)

COPY

(N.B.) The following seems to be only part, and some of it seems to be missing.

Claims Taranaki had.

It is a fact worthy of observation that the Waikatos, in returning their conquered enemies to this district from which they were captured, without any recognised stipulation or condition respecting their lands, excepting a formal understanding or advice emanating from the Missionaries, who were instrumental in returning them, that they should occupy their own lands exclusively, - did thereby acquire the same right of property that they had forfeited, when subject to the Waikatos. It does not, however, appear, - neither is it probable that the Waikatos granted the same privilege to the natives who abandoned the district from fear of their incursions. Their clemency in this respect only extended to those with whom they became associated and familiar, by the circumstance of being conquered; and family connections arising from intercourse with the conquered females. Indeed, some of the Chiefs, in warm terms, have openly expressed their determination to resist any attempt on the part of the Southern Ngatiawas to return to his district. One of them in particular, who returned the first native to this district, named Taonui, who possesses considerable influence, used a very emphatic expression, when talking with me one day on the subject; which was, -"when the bird once deserts its nest, it never again returns to it." Such is the case with the Ngatiawa. They are quiet now where they are. Let them stop there, and let those I have returned also remain quietly in their lands.

Te Pakeru remarked once, when speaking to Katatori, - "I have returned to your land, not that you should annoy the Europeans, but live in peace with them." And so far have the Waikatos either considered them selves pledged to maintain their faith with these people to occupy the district undisturbed from their having returned with a promise to enjoy their land again or from a threat to occupy a country that it might cause some difficulty to retain peaceably, or from what is still more probable, a superstitious fear that their doing so would subject them to the vengeance of the reputed witches and priest-craft, or Maketu natives; which his district has been reputed to possess, and they did not choose to reside there. Such, however, is the present state of the Waikato claim, that when advanced, or spoken of, it is only mentioned in relation to their dead relatives, who were lost in the wars here; which, according to their custom, substantiates a claim frequently recognised and paid for by Europeans in many parts of the Island; where such have been advanced by the natives, - as many Waikato natives of Chieftain descent, are now residing in this district, with women of the Ngatiawa; from whom they admit their claims are derived; and never have they in any instance applied to me for compensation for land in the district, when about to be disposed of; and when I have made a point of enquiring if they had any claim to urge, they invariably replied in the negative; stating that their claims might descend to their children, but that their only control was from their female connections.

(Signed)
Donald McLean.
January 22nd, 1848.

Part of:
Papers relating to provincial affairs - Taranaki. Inspector of police, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0123 (71 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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