Object #1013841 from MS-Papers-0032-0319

3 pages written 17 Nov 1856 by William Halse in Taranaki Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items). 28 letters addressed from New Plymouth & Taranaki

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

COPY. Taranaki
17th. November 1856


My dear McLean,

The steamer is, I believe, expected this week, but I shall post this letter, with a copy of Saturday's "Herald", per the Overland Mail, our sure opportunity. You will read in it a very excellent letter anent the Chilman affair, which the writer has watched carefully in Committee; and the letter loses none of its force from the writer having made himself responsible for what he advances, by affixing his own signature. Mr. Richard Brown is prepared, further, if necessary, to produce evidence on oath, of Chilman having told Mogridge that he might use the swamp which was Crown land. But Mogridge did not care to interfere with land beyond his own boundaries, and so nothing was done. The silence of the Superintendent, Official and private, only betrays his own complicity in the matter. It may be otherwise, but one can arrive at no other conclusion. Now any movement on his part would

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English (ATL)

be considered a consequence of R. Brown's letter. The Council are called for this morning, relative to their round robin for a dissolution; when the opportunity may be taken to go into another matter, perhaps this of Chilman's. But it is too late. I cannot learn that C. Brown has any chance in a new election. Perhaps some ruse will be attempted for putting off one until July; but the letter of the Council, asking to be dissolved, will, I hope, be considered by the Governor, as leaving him no choice. The advantage of an immediate election will be felt elsewhere than in Taranaki. The Central Government will be freed from a factious though insignificant clique; and no man in the place could be found so illassorted for the proper duties of Superintendent as our present man. He has played ducks and drakes with us. We are beggared beyond hope, though we get our proportion of everything under the new state of things; and are constantly borrowing from Auckland. All these things considered, any change will be for the better. Flight seems to be our man, --- not all we could wish --- but a Government man. We prove our inability daily to carry on without the Central Government; and we must have a Superintendent who will act in concert with it, and as a part of it, which we are, --- anything to the contrary said, notwithstanding.

The natives are out fighting. The other day, when one of Nikorima's natives got a shot in the foot. This, it is said, will not prevent peace, since Roka had gone over to Katatore, whose star is in the ascendant, bad luck to him.

The Bishop and Mrs. Selwyn arrived on Saturday evening. He preached no end of times yesterday, to crowded congregations. I wish he had never interfered in our native quarrels, and in a manner so disagreeable to us.

There is a movement here for getting rid of Mr. Pheney, as the Editor of the "Herald"; a very important one, if only shewing the earnestness of those who are foremost in demanding a new state of things. The paper is a mere organ of a party, and has been since the present man was installed. The present opportunity is a good one, as now that Mr. Pheney is provided for by the local Government at a salary of £200, the change will

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English (ATL)

involve no hardship to him. It is intended to carry on the paper by a Committee until a fitting Editor is found; whose opinions shall represent the proprietor's, and the the subscribers. I do not know if you subscribe to the "Herald". If not, and you observe a change for the better it would encourage Woon in his course, if you were to renew your subscription for a time. He would see that the change is appreciated out of Taranaki.

Births, deaths, and marriages, --- there are none; except Mrs. Imlay, of a boy or girl, --- I don't know which. She was attended by Dr. Neild, who is getting into extensive practice as a Chloroform administrator. Susan Newland has given up all hopes of Captain King, since his marriage is proved to her satisfaction, and is content to unite her destinies, (whenever the gentleman likes) with one, Mr. Brind. Deaths, I repeat, there are none. People suffer all but this in Taranaki.


Yours sincerely (Signed)
W. Halse.
P. S. I send you the paper enclosed, to ensure its transmission at once, as it is the custom to keep them for a vessel, which may not come for some time. To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

COPY. Taranaki
17th. November 1856


My dear McLean,

The steamer is, I believe, expected this week, but I shall post this letter, with a copy of Saturday's "Herald", per the Overland Mail, our sure opportunity. You will read in it a very excellent letter anent the Chilman affair, which the writer has watched carefully in Committee; and the letter loses none of its force from the writer having made himself responsible for what he advances, by affixing his own signature. Mr. Richard Brown is prepared, further, if necessary, to produce evidence on oath, of Chilman having told Mogridge that he might use the swamp which was Crown land. But Mogridge did not care to interfere with land beyond his own boundaries, and so nothing was done. The silence of the Superintendent, Official and private, only betrays his own complicity in the matter. It may be otherwise, but one can arrive at no other conclusion. Now any movement on his part would be considered a consequence of R. Brown's letter. The Council are called for this morning, relative to their round robin for a dissolution; when the opportunity may be taken to go into another matter, perhaps this of Chilman's. But it is too late. I cannot learn that C. Brown has any chance in a new election. Perhaps some ruse will be attempted for putting off one until July; but the letter of the Council, asking to be dissolved, will, I hope, be considered by the Governor, as leaving him no choice. The advantage of an immediate election will be felt elsewhere than in Taranaki. The Central Government will be freed from a factious though insignificant clique; and no man in the place could be found so illassorted for the proper duties of Superintendent as our present man. He has played ducks and drakes with us. We are beggared beyond hope, though we get our proportion of everything under the new state of things; and are constantly borrowing from Auckland. All these things considered, any change will be for the better. Flight seems to be our man, --- not all we could wish --- but a Government man. We prove our inability daily to carry on without the Central Government; and we must have a Superintendent who will act in concert with it, and as a part of it, which we are, --- anything to the contrary said, notwithstanding.

The natives are out fighting. The other day, when one of Nikorima's natives got a shot in the foot. This, it is said, will not prevent peace, since Roka had gone over to Katatore, whose star is in the ascendant, bad luck to him.

The Bishop and Mrs. Selwyn arrived on Saturday evening. He preached no end of times yesterday, to crowded congregations. I wish he had never interfered in our native quarrels, and in a manner so disagreeable to us.

There is a movement here for getting rid of Mr. Pheney, as the Editor of the "Herald"; a very important one, if only shewing the earnestness of those who are foremost in demanding a new state of things. The paper is a mere organ of a party, and has been since the present man was installed. The present opportunity is a good one, as now that Mr. Pheney is provided for by the local Government at a salary of £200, the change will involve no hardship to him. It is intended to carry on the paper by a Committee until a fitting Editor is found; whose opinions shall represent the proprietor's, and the the subscribers. I do not know if you subscribe to the "Herald". If not, and you observe a change for the better it would encourage Woon in his course, if you were to renew your subscription for a time. He would see that the change is appreciated out of Taranaki.

Births, deaths, and marriages, --- there are none; except Mrs. Imlay, of a boy or girl, --- I don't know which. She was attended by Dr. Neild, who is getting into extensive practice as a Chloroform administrator. Susan Newland has given up all hopes of Captain King, since his marriage is proved to her satisfaction, and is content to unite her destinies, (whenever the gentleman likes) with one, Mr. Brind. Deaths, I repeat, there are none. People suffer all but this in Taranaki.


Yours sincerely (Signed)
W. Halse.
P. S. I send you the paper enclosed, to ensure its transmission at once, as it is the custom to keep them for a vessel, which may not come for some time. To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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