Object #1013689 from MS-Papers-0032-0218

4 pages written 5 Aug 1871 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Tauranga to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0218 (56 digitised items). 50 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland and Waimate, 1871-1876

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Tauranga
August 5th. 1871.

Private.
My dear Mr. McLean,

The "Ashley" is expected in tomorrow morning on her way South. I drop you a few lines by her but whether you will have time to read them I very much question. I will be as short as possible.

There has been a little rumpus at Maketu and from what I hear from natives I am afraid Hamlin is somewhat to blame. He is too hasty and does not command his temper sufficiently to deal successfully with these most troublesome Arawa natives. He is very unpopular -- altho' he has said that if he is only left alone he will bring them down to their bearings. If I were to question his acts and make them the subject of investigation as between himself and natives as a natural

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

consequence his influence would altogether be destroyed. I am called here and called there by the Arawas because they do not wish to be left entirely to his management. I only hope no serious rupture will occur.

The news received from Whakatane is from Urewera sources and is I think corroborative of what Mair telegraphed the other day. The very fact of Te Kooti being on foot would make all the coast settlements anxious. To be "forewarned is to be fore armed" and I think Roberts will see that every vigilance is kept up.

I am curious to know how Tamaikoha will act. He will make no promises. He does not ask for arms. He asked me abruptly the other day whether Te Kooti was a "tangata Hara" -- at first I was rather startled. But I thought it was only to draw me out. I soon showed in what manner he was a ruffian of the darkest die -- when I had finished Hoani Ngaruru of the

Page 3 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Arawa who accompanied him here took up the black brush and painted him black enough -- counting off his many crimes on his fingers. Tamaikoha replied that he was satisfied. He only wanted to know my opinion -- for he said if he is such a monster I shall feel justified in securing his destruction by any means. I told Tamaikowha that we wanted to bring him be judged by the law -- and if he suceeded in capturing him that the Government would make him a substantial recognition of his services. He said I will feel my way and communicate with you. I do not fear Te Kooti but I do distrust the Urewera.

He is gone back and I hope that he will do us service. I have authorized twelve men -- eleven beside himself -- he is to get 4/- per diem and his companions 2/- neither arms nor ammunition are wanted he says he has both. There is something honest about the man that I like -- like -- and he has not been the wretch described by some of his enemies.

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


The Tauranga District Lands investigation progresses favorably and without cost to the natives. Why should not the Native Land Court be made the same. The best order is kept, and I am able to prevent any bursts of angry feeling - at least I have done so hitherto. I have been kept pretty closely at it - but thankful to say my health is wonderfully better. I shall have to take some of Mair's papers to Auckland for onsultation before I give decisions.

School master has arrived and has taken possession of his quarters. He did not bring school books with him - native little and large want to go to school.

With regard to road works - I am afraid you have not quite understood my reports. What I wished to show was that if natives take work £1700 below the estimate made by our engineers then injustice must be done some where, - but the concession made by P.W. Department is all and more than I asked for - and I am quite satisfied. I think if I could talk to either Mr. Fox or Mr. Gisborne for half an hour I would succeed in convincing them that I am right.

I must close - I wish you well over your coming labors. You have enemies but I know that they could not do half so well.


Faithfully yours,
Hy. T. Clarke.

English (ATL)

Tauranga
August 5th. 1871.

Private.
My dear Mr. McLean,

The "Ashley" is expected in tomorrow morning on her way South. I drop you a few lines by her but whether you will have time to read them I very much question. I will be as short as possible.

There has been a little rumpus at Maketu and from what I hear from natives I am afraid Hamlin is somewhat to blame. He is too hasty and does not command his temper sufficiently to deal successfully with these most troublesome Arawa natives. He is very unpopular -- altho' he has said that if he is only left alone he will bring them down to their bearings. If I were to question his acts and make them the subject of investigation as between himself and natives as a natural consequence his influence would altogether be destroyed. I am called here and called there by the Arawas because they do not wish to be left entirely to his management. I only hope no serious rupture will occur.

The news received from Whakatane is from Urewera sources and is I think corroborative of what Mair telegraphed the other day. The very fact of Te Kooti being on foot would make all the coast settlements anxious. To be "forewarned is to be fore armed" and I think Roberts will see that every vigilance is kept up.

I am curious to know how Tamaikoha will act. He will make no promises. He does not ask for arms. He asked me abruptly the other day whether Te Kooti was a "tangata Hara" -- at first I was rather startled. But I thought it was only to draw me out. I soon showed in what manner he was a ruffian of the darkest die -- when I had finished Hoani Ngaruru of the Arawa who accompanied him here took up the black brush and painted him black enough -- counting off his many crimes on his fingers. Tamaikoha replied that he was satisfied. He only wanted to know my opinion -- for he said if he is such a monster I shall feel justified in securing his destruction by any means. I told Tamaikowha that we wanted to bring him be judged by the law -- and if he suceeded in capturing him that the Government would make him a substantial recognition of his services. He said I will feel my way and communicate with you. I do not fear Te Kooti but I do distrust the Urewera.

He is gone back and I hope that he will do us service. I have authorized twelve men -- eleven beside himself -- he is to get 4/- per diem and his companions 2/- neither arms nor ammunition are wanted he says he has both. There is something honest about the man that I like -- like -- and he has not been the wretch described by some of his enemies.

The Tauranga District Lands investigation progresses favorably and without cost to the natives. Why should not the Native Land Court be made the same. The best order is kept, and I am able to prevent any bursts of angry feeling - at least I have done so hitherto. I have been kept pretty closely at it - but thankful to say my health is wonderfully better. I shall have to take some of Mair's papers to Auckland for onsultation before I give decisions.

School master has arrived and has taken possession of his quarters. He did not bring school books with him - native little and large want to go to school.

With regard to road works - I am afraid you have not quite understood my reports. What I wished to show was that if natives take work £1700 below the estimate made by our engineers then injustice must be done some where, - but the concession made by P.W. Department is all and more than I asked for - and I am quite satisfied. I think if I could talk to either Mr. Fox or Mr. Gisborne for half an hour I would succeed in convincing them that I am right.

I must close - I wish you well over your coming labors. You have enemies but I know that they could not do half so well.


Faithfully yours,
Hy. T. Clarke.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0218 (56 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1013689). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments