Object #1013283 from MS-Papers-0032-0200

8 pages written 3 Sep 1866 by James H Campbell in Waiapu to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - James H Campbell, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0200 (51 digitised items). 50 letters written from Auckland, Maraekakaho, Doon Side, Waiapu, Napier, Gisborne (Turanga), Wellington

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Waiapu
Sept. 3rd. 1866.


My dear McLean

In my last I stated to you as nearly as I could the state of affairs as they actually are here at present.

The great meeting took place here yesterday. There was a large assemblage and a great variety of subjects were discussed. I sat from ten in the morning till five and although there was a good deal to weary there was much to interest. The principal speakers were Morgan, Raniera, Mohi and Wycliff - Henry Potae, Karauria and one or two others sent letters of apology on account of their having promised to go to Ahuriri to some meeting there called by Karaitiana.

They do not seem to relish the idea of Mr. Preece's proceedings on behalf of certain Auckland parties as he appears to have taken up with the wrong parties in treating for oil springs and other lands. I have forwarded to you a letter on this subject by their request, and they have written to Turanga on the same subject.

There is a good deal at the bottom of it. From what I could see yesterday Raniera and Mohi are thoroughly embued with the old Bishop's (William's) principle viz. keep out the Pakeha. How shrewd and cunning a man is Raniera. Mohi not so shrewd not so clever has the animal bump of acquisitiveness to an awful extent and taking advantage late occurrences lords it over all, levying a sort of black mail upon every man's property - Morgan is the man of them all but unfootunate owing to his infirmity of taking a glass too much occasionally succumbs in many cases where he should be paramount. I know I am telliing you what you know very well already but I hope you will allow that my judgement formed in a short time is a tolerably correct one. Wycliff is a weak man but well intentioned. He composed a song in honor of my coming. I have not much fear about getting on well with them all - I like the Tuparoa Natives better a great deal than those here who I am sorry to say are given to pilfering etc. and a good deal debased. I allowed Morgan to lay down the law to them yesterday which he did with a vengenace, telling them that as they no longer regarded the infliction of fines there would soon be a lock up provided for them where they would be taught better behaviour.

I am going up the Coast next week. Wycliff tells me that there are any number of cases to hear.

I do not know how I am to manage all this large district - I have been busy all up the Coast and fully occupied since I came here. It will be a case of the saddle the whole time - I only trust my strength may be sufficient. I had some dreadfully hard work getting up. The Hills were in a horrible state from incessant rain and I had in some places to shove my horse two or three hundred yards before me down a hill. What a beautiful country it is - I have had no time to do anything yet to my homestead which is to be - I hope the Government will have the generosity to help me with a house, an office and a lock up, the last two indispensably necessary. By the request of the people at Turanga and here I have written to the Post Master General to ask for a postal communication between the two places - as it is at present we are awkwardly situated depending upon any stray vessel calling. I don't know how they intend paying the officers of the District but I have written to ask them.

Goodbye My dear McLean, and believe me
ever yours,
J. H. Campbell.

Part of:
Inward letters - James H Campbell, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0200 (51 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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