Object #1013208 from MS-Papers-0032-0826

4 pages written 28 Sep 1850 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward and outward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0826 (43 digitised items). Mainly letters between Susan Strang and her future husband Donald McLean. Includes a letter from her mother Susannah Strang to McLean, 1849; letter from E Shand to Susan Strang, written from Portobello, 1850 in which she gives her impressions of Dunedin

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
September 28th 1850


My dear Mr McLean

I was just going to sit down to write in answer to your letter by yesterday's mail when Mr Smith came in and as it was too cold to write in the parlour or my room I have been obliged to wait till he went away and I am afraid now I shall not have much time to write before Sunday morning. I am sorry I am not to see you so soon as I expected. Perhaps after all it is better you should finish your business before coming in as you may then be able to stay longer with me. Your absence does not make me impatient for I feel so

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English (MD)

assured of your attachment, and I am certain if we were to be separated for years our affection for each other would be unchanged.

I was at a dance at Mr Fitzherbert's last night. It was a very pleasant party, although I must say I would have been much happier at home with you to talk to me had you been there. I think you would have enjoyed it very much and you would have had the pleasure of seeing Miss Lewis who is I think a great favourite of yours. Do you remember how much attention you paid her at the Settler's Ball? If she were a few years younger I should feel very much afraid that she would take you from me.

I am sorry to acknowledge that I do not deserve the praise you give me for early rising, as two or three times this week I have not got up so soon as I usually do but you must

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English (MD)

forgive me for being so lazy as I have not been able for some time to go to sleep before 1 and sometimes 2 o'clock in the morning, and you know it is impossible if I do not sleep well at night to get up early in the morning.

You say that on Tuesday morning you were in the garden admiring the dew drops on the flowers and thinking that I might be doing the same. Is it not strange that I was doing so that morning. I remember I stood for some time at the end of the verandah looking at a spider's web on which the dew sparkled like diamonds in the sun, and I thought of you and wondered where you were and what you were doing. It is strange we were both admiring the same thing that morning. I must now conclude my letter for I feel very much fatigued. It was past 4 o'clock this morning when I went to bed. I am so sleepy I hardly

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English (MD)

know what I am writing, so if I have written nonsense which is most likely you must excuse it. Mama desires me to give her kindest regards. She intended to have written to you today but Papa came home early and insisted that she should go out with him. Good night dearest.


And believe me to remain
Ever your affectionate
Susan Douglas Strang

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
September 28th 1850


My dear Mr McLean

I was just going to sit down to write in answer to your letter by yesterday's mail when Mr Smith came in and as it was too cold to write in the parlour or my room I have been obliged to wait till he went away and I am afraid now I shall not have much time to write before Sunday morning. I am sorry I am not to see you so soon as I expected. Perhaps after all it is better you should finish your business before coming in as you may then be able to stay longer with me. Your absence does not make me impatient for I feel so assured of your attachment, and I am certain if we were to be separated for years our affection for each other would be unchanged.

I was at a dance at Mr Fitzherbert's last night. It was a very pleasant party, although I must say I would have been much happier at home with you to talk to me had you been there. I think you would have enjoyed it very much and you would have had the pleasure of seeing Miss Lewis who is I think a great favourite of yours. Do you remember how much attention you paid her at the Settler's Ball? If she were a few years younger I should feel very much afraid that she would take you from me.

I am sorry to acknowledge that I do not deserve the praise you give me for early rising, as two or three times this week I have not got up so soon as I usually do but you must forgive me for being so lazy as I have not been able for some time to go to sleep before 1 and sometimes 2 o'clock in the morning, and you know it is impossible if I do not sleep well at night to get up early in the morning.

You say that on Tuesday morning you were in the garden admiring the dew drops on the flowers and thinking that I might be doing the same. Is it not strange that I was doing so that morning. I remember I stood for some time at the end of the verandah looking at a spider's web on which the dew sparkled like diamonds in the sun, and I thought of you and wondered where you were and what you were doing. It is strange we were both admiring the same thing that morning. I must now conclude my letter for I feel very much fatigued. It was past 4 o'clock this morning when I went to bed. I am so sleepy I hardly know what I am writing, so if I have written nonsense which is most likely you must excuse it. Mama desires me to give her kindest regards. She intended to have written to you today but Papa came home early and insisted that she should go out with him. Good night dearest.


And believe me to remain
Ever your affectionate
Susan Douglas Strang

Part of:
Inward and outward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0826 (43 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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