Object #1013140 from MS-Papers-0032-0228

5 pages written 20 Dec 1852 by George Sisson Cooper in Taranaki Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items). 105 letters written from Taranaki, Hawke's Bay & Wellington. Contains correspondence between McLean and Cooper with regard to the purchase of Maori land in Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa in particular, and various complaints and issues that arose from the purchases; also contains information and discussions about the spread of the Pai Marire and Ringatu religions (again, with a particular focus on Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa), and about general Maori affairs. Includes draft letters from McLean to Cooper; letters from George's wife Ellen C Cooper, 1863-1872, and from Sarah Cooper (undated).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Taranaki
December 20th. 1852


My dear McLean,

I received your long and friendly letter by the overland mail, and I have once more to thank you for your kind, and I may almost say brotherly assistance and cooperation. I have very little to tell you - I have written to Ta Kerei and to Peketahi giving them the Governor's answer about the offer at Mokau, which I have I think conveyed to them in such a way that they have no grounds of complaint. I send a copy officially to Domett.

Poharama is delighted, and the Puketapus equally disgusted at the Governor's agreeing to the Hua boundary. For my own part I fully agree in your view of the propriety of it, and am trying all I can to induce Raniera ma to consent but they are very obstinate at present, and say that when the present offer is settled, then they will agree to the

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English (ATL)

other; and Po is equally determined to stick to what he has said. He has written to the Governor, and I send the letter by this mail to say that he is much pleased with His Ex. 's letter, and recommending that Raniera should be written to - a very excellent idea in my opinion and one wh. I had intended myself to recommend. In the mean time I think the best thing I can do is to keep both parties as much as possible in good humour and try to bring about a reconciliation by every means in my power. Po suggested a meeting at which he was to openly offer the land to the Hua, using the names of the Southern Chiefs in support of the offer, so that the pakeke of the Puketapus might be seen. I do not however like this idea as it will put them in open and public opposition and things are sure to be said at the meeting which cannot afterwards be recalled or explained way, and in short I fear it wd. have the effect of preventing our obtaining any part of the land at all. Whereas by working quietly with both parties and my exertions on the spot being seconded by letters from Sir G. Grey yourself and the Maori Chiefs at Wellington - I think we may in time remove all the obstacles.

With respect to Mangoraka all remains as before. Katatore is very blustering and is continually annoying the other party by killing their pigs and other petty annoyances. my own impression is that if we could get hold of the £500 in silver, and show it to them from time to time, telling them that it was lying tapu till the sale was completed, Mr. Whaitere and Co. would soon come round. But we cannot induce the Auckland people to take this view of it - they will not send the money, or enderatand why it is wanted, or why it is not perfectly sufficient to authorize the Sub Treasurer to draw when the arrangements are all completed and the deed ready for signature. I think however that my last letter will open their eyes a little.

I had intended visiting Auckland this Summer, and to have taken Ihaia, Parata and 3 or 4 other young Chiefs with me, going via Taupo and Waipa

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English (ATL)

so as to drop upon Taonui enroute I could then have explained many things relating to this place on which the Auckland authorities are lamentably ignorant. But I have recd, a letter from my mother saying that they are coming down at once and I am expecting them every hour, so that I cannot now go up - at least not until the end of the summer.

Bayly's case remains in statu quo. The reward has been increased to £20, as Sir G. Grey suggested, but nothing has been done further in the matter - the Natives never allude to it now.

Halse is standing for Supt. and his canvass is going on with spirit. He has the support of every honest thinking man in the place. Sir. G. Grey behaved like a trump in the matter. His answer to Wilson's letter was verbatim as I said it wd. be. Wicksteed and C. Brown are in the field. W. has few supporters, but C.B. is backed by the "Association" who are using every means to have him returned. He is going to the dogs head foremost, having let his store and given up the retail business to Batkin. Two heavy mortgages are about being immediately called in and his marriage settlement prevents his raising money to pay them off - so that his ruin in a very short time is inevitable, and his patriotism is all in the hopes of obtaining employment and a salary.

Rogan has sold Skibbereen, and is living In town doing just enough to keep his bread buttered and no more, I read what you said to him and he says he will feel greatly obliged for employment anywhere that he can get a decent salary. I wish he had something here, but O.C. has the offer, of the appt. under Halse and I think he will accept it. Rogan is so perfectly trustworthy

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English (ATL)

and understands the Maories so well that he would often be an invaluable assistant to me were he in the service. He behave extremely well at Mokau.

W. Carrington came out in the St. Michael as blind as ever or worse his disease having returned on the voyage. He has gone to Tapuae to live with the Maories, and will I fear be in the way of our obtaining the land there, of which I had great hopes having half talked old Rangi into it. He said that if Ngarongamate agreed he thought it might be done, but I fear now that Welly will get hold of him and talk him over and the same with Bob when he arrives, as he is sure to see him first. W. Williams also seemed to agree to it.

I will not pain you my dear McLean by writing a letter of condolence

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

upon your loss. You will I know give me credit for sympathising in your grief.

I must now conclude as it is just post hour. I did not mean to have troubled you with so long a letter but it has spun out in spite of myself.

Believe me to be
My dear McLean, Yours very sincerely
G. S. Cooper.

English (ATL)

Taranaki
December 20th. 1852


My dear McLean,

I received your long and friendly letter by the overland mail, and I have once more to thank you for your kind, and I may almost say brotherly assistance and cooperation. I have very little to tell you - I have written to Ta Kerei and to Peketahi giving them the Governor's answer about the offer at Mokau, which I have I think conveyed to them in such a way that they have no grounds of complaint. I send a copy officially to Domett.

Poharama is delighted, and the Puketapus equally disgusted at the Governor's agreeing to the Hua boundary. For my own part I fully agree in your view of the propriety of it, and am trying all I can to induce Raniera ma to consent but they are very obstinate at present, and say that when the present offer is settled, then they will agree to the other; and Po is equally determined to stick to what he has said. He has written to the Governor, and I send the letter by this mail to say that he is much pleased with His Ex. 's letter, and recommending that Raniera should be written to - a very excellent idea in my opinion and one wh. I had intended myself to recommend. In the mean time I think the best thing I can do is to keep both parties as much as possible in good humour and try to bring about a reconciliation by every means in my power. Po suggested a meeting at which he was to openly offer the land to the Hua, using the names of the Southern Chiefs in support of the offer, so that the pakeke of the Puketapus might be seen. I do not however like this idea as it will put them in open and public opposition and things are sure to be said at the meeting which cannot afterwards be recalled or explained way, and in short I fear it wd. have the effect of preventing our obtaining any part of the land at all. Whereas by working quietly with both parties and my exertions on the spot being seconded by letters from Sir G. Grey yourself and the Maori Chiefs at Wellington - I think we may in time remove all the obstacles.

With respect to Mangoraka all remains as before. Katatore is very blustering and is continually annoying the other party by killing their pigs and other petty annoyances. my own impression is that if we could get hold of the £500 in silver, and show it to them from time to time, telling them that it was lying tapu till the sale was completed, Mr. Whaitere and Co. would soon come round. But we cannot induce the Auckland people to take this view of it - they will not send the money, or enderatand why it is wanted, or why it is not perfectly sufficient to authorize the Sub Treasurer to draw when the arrangements are all completed and the deed ready for signature. I think however that my last letter will open their eyes a little.

I had intended visiting Auckland this Summer, and to have taken Ihaia, Parata and 3 or 4 other young Chiefs with me, going via Taupo and Waipa so as to drop upon Taonui enroute I could then have explained many things relating to this place on which the Auckland authorities are lamentably ignorant. But I have recd, a letter from my mother saying that they are coming down at once and I am expecting them every hour, so that I cannot now go up - at least not until the end of the summer.

Bayly's case remains in statu quo. The reward has been increased to £20, as Sir G. Grey suggested, but nothing has been done further in the matter - the Natives never allude to it now.

Halse is standing for Supt. and his canvass is going on with spirit. He has the support of every honest thinking man in the place. Sir. G. Grey behaved like a trump in the matter. His answer to Wilson's letter was verbatim as I said it wd. be. Wicksteed and C. Brown are in the field. W. has few supporters, but C.B. is backed by the "Association" who are using every means to have him returned. He is going to the dogs head foremost, having let his store and given up the retail business to Batkin. Two heavy mortgages are about being immediately called in and his marriage settlement prevents his raising money to pay them off - so that his ruin in a very short time is inevitable, and his patriotism is all in the hopes of obtaining employment and a salary.

Rogan has sold Skibbereen, and is living In town doing just enough to keep his bread buttered and no more, I read what you said to him and he says he will feel greatly obliged for employment anywhere that he can get a decent salary. I wish he had something here, but O.C. has the offer, of the appt. under Halse and I think he will accept it. Rogan is so perfectly trustworthy and understands the Maories so well that he would often be an invaluable assistant to me were he in the service. He behave extremely well at Mokau.

W. Carrington came out in the St. Michael as blind as ever or worse his disease having returned on the voyage. He has gone to Tapuae to live with the Maories, and will I fear be in the way of our obtaining the land there, of which I had great hopes having half talked old Rangi into it. He said that if Ngarongamate agreed he thought it might be done, but I fear now that Welly will get hold of him and talk him over and the same with Bob when he arrives, as he is sure to see him first. W. Williams also seemed to agree to it.

I will not pain you my dear McLean by writing a letter of condolence upon your loss. You will I know give me credit for sympathising in your grief.

I must now conclude as it is just post hour. I did not mean to have troubled you with so long a letter but it has spun out in spite of myself.

Believe me to be
My dear McLean, Yours very sincerely
G. S. Cooper.

Part of:
Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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