Object #1013126 from MS-Papers-0032-0010

4 pages written 28 Sep 1860 by William Nicholas Searancke in Waikanae to Sir Donald McLean in Auckland Region

From: Secretary, Native Department - Administration of native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0010 (29 digitised items). Includes papers relating to the activites of Ngati Toa and its allies along the Kapiti Coast at Wainui, Whareroa, Te Uruhi, Waikanae, Otaki, Ohau, and Porouatawhao ca 1860. This was a period when the colonial settlers at Wellington thought themselves to be under imminent attack by Ngati Toa and others. Wi Tako Ngatata's activities were under suspicion as well (ie Wi Tako left the Hutt Valley with a mounted escort of sixty seven well-armed men from Waikanae and Whareroa).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Waikanae

28th Sept. 1860



Sir,

I have the honor to inform you that in consequence of certain information received by me last Monday while in Wairarapa, (pointing out boundaries of Native Reserves to Mr. Assist. Surveyor Fraser) of contemplated movements on the West Coast. I determined to proceed at once to Wellington, leaving Wairarapa on Monday evening I arrived at an early hour on the following morning in Wellington where I met with Mr. Turton R. M. this gentlemans representations have induced me to proceed at once up this Coast in order that you may be fully informed of the movements of Wi Tako and his followers.

On the 7th instant Wi Tako with about thirty seven followers in all and an escort of thirty men from Waikanae and

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

and Whareroa who had arrived two days previously left the Hutt for Waikanae, they were all mounted on horseback marching in regular order - two and two were nearly all armed with either single or double barrelled guns and the majority had either two or three Cartridge boxes full of ammunition in their centre were four drays of luggage. I subsequently spoke to Wi Tako about this threatening display, he informed me that it was against his wish but that it was not in his power to prevent it, fortunately the party started from the Hutt at an hour when there were but few travellers on the Road. They arrived at Whareroa 36 miles distant from Wellington on Tuesday the 11th inst and at once proceeded in cpmpany with the Residents there to cultivate and plant all the old plantations these completed they felled a large piece of bush for later planting.

On Tuesday last the 25th inst. Wi Tako and party arrived at Waikanae having strongly urged all the Natives of Wainui, Whareroa and the Uruhi to be strong and industrious to plant food for themselves. His arrival at

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English (ATL)

Waikanae and the late arrivals from the Sound and other settlements in the Straits have raised the male adult population of Waikanae to at least 120 souls all busily occupied planting I may here state that not only in this particular locality is this increased activity apparent but all up the Coast as far as Whanganui and also throughout the Wairarapa. Two ideas now appear to occupy the Native mind in this province the one to concentrate as much as possible, the other to provide a good Commissariat to this object all their energies now appear to be devoted and both show a return to their old Maori customs and a disposition to be prepared for any emergency they all both the old residents and the new arrivals express themselves anxious that peace should be preserved in this District and I am still of opinion that no outbreak or disturbance of any sort will take place without some extraordinary provocation.

Eramia, one of the leading men in favor of the hoisting of the hoisting of the kings flag at Otaki came last Friday the 21st inst. to obtain the sanction and assistance of Wi Tako and his friends to at

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

once erect a Flag staff and hoist the Kings flag in Otaki but Wi Tako expressed himself publicly before all the Natives to have nothing to do with the Flag that it was his intention to live in peace with the Europeans that he has come to settle at Waikanae and had no intention of going at present to Otaki. Wi Tako has also declined all the offers of land made to him from Otaki Ohau and Porotawhao.

I have to apologise for closing so abruptly the Mail now starting for Wellington.

I have the honor to be

Sir
your most obedient Servant
William N. Searancke
District Commr. To: D. MacLean
Esquire, Native Secretary Auckland

English (ATL)

Waikanae

28th Sept. 1860



Sir,

I have the honor to inform you that in consequence of certain information received by me last Monday while in Wairarapa, (pointing out boundaries of Native Reserves to Mr. Assist. Surveyor Fraser) of contemplated movements on the West Coast. I determined to proceed at once to Wellington, leaving Wairarapa on Monday evening I arrived at an early hour on the following morning in Wellington where I met with Mr. Turton R. M. this gentlemans representations have induced me to proceed at once up this Coast in order that you may be fully informed of the movements of Wi Tako and his followers.

On the 7th instant Wi Tako with about thirty seven followers in all and an escort of thirty men from Waikanae and and Whareroa who had arrived two days previously left the Hutt for Waikanae, they were all mounted on horseback marching in regular order - two and two were nearly all armed with either single or double barrelled guns and the majority had either two or three Cartridge boxes full of ammunition in their centre were four drays of luggage. I subsequently spoke to Wi Tako about this threatening display, he informed me that it was against his wish but that it was not in his power to prevent it, fortunately the party started from the Hutt at an hour when there were but few travellers on the Road. They arrived at Whareroa 36 miles distant from Wellington on Tuesday the 11th inst and at once proceeded in cpmpany with the Residents there to cultivate and plant all the old plantations these completed they felled a large piece of bush for later planting.

On Tuesday last the 25th inst. Wi Tako and party arrived at Waikanae having strongly urged all the Natives of Wainui, Whareroa and the Uruhi to be strong and industrious to plant food for themselves. His arrival at Waikanae and the late arrivals from the Sound and other settlements in the Straits have raised the male adult population of Waikanae to at least 120 souls all busily occupied planting I may here state that not only in this particular locality is this increased activity apparent but all up the Coast as far as Whanganui and also throughout the Wairarapa. Two ideas now appear to occupy the Native mind in this province the one to concentrate as much as possible, the other to provide a good Commissariat to this object all their energies now appear to be devoted and both show a return to their old Maori customs and a disposition to be prepared for any emergency they all both the old residents and the new arrivals express themselves anxious that peace should be preserved in this District and I am still of opinion that no outbreak or disturbance of any sort will take place without some extraordinary provocation.

Eramia, one of the leading men in favor of the hoisting of the hoisting of the kings flag at Otaki came last Friday the 21st inst. to obtain the sanction and assistance of Wi Tako and his friends to at once erect a Flag staff and hoist the Kings flag in Otaki but Wi Tako expressed himself publicly before all the Natives to have nothing to do with the Flag that it was his intention to live in peace with the Europeans that he has come to settle at Waikanae and had no intention of going at present to Otaki. Wi Tako has also declined all the offers of land made to him from Otaki Ohau and Porotawhao.

I have to apologise for closing so abruptly the Mail now starting for Wellington.

I have the honor to be

Sir
your most obedient Servant
William N. Searancke
District Commr. To: D. MacLean
Esquire, Native Secretary Auckland

Part of:
Secretary, Native Department - Administration of native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0010 (29 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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