Object #1012728 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

4 pages written 19 Aug 1869 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

19 August 1869

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I see with much pleasure that you are getting on well with all the measures you bring before the house. I had a strong idaia that things would go well from the first but I am happy to see they are even going better than I expected now that you are instaled secure and firm. We must not allow you to pass over this districk as you did when Superintendent. You must know that we are all quite allive to what can be done for to benefit us all and if know one will lift their voice in the matter I must try what I can do. In the first place we want the mail by this road to Hamden and a mail cart to take it that far. Carlyon I dare say will gave you his version off it.

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English (MD)

A small subsidey would enable a man to start. I have been at Skellicorn about it and told him Carlyon would suport him if he would gave an estimate what he could do it for besides his chance on the road with passengers and goods. Now as the Postmaster General is the man the map of the country would show him this is the most direct line and why not let us have the advantage. Politicks have nothing to do with the justice of this clame. The other side of the country got everything there own way two long and it is high time for us this side to look to ourselves. In the 2nd place you have got the Road Bill before the House and from what I can see it will be carried also. If so you will surely never allow the mane road to go out of the most direct line through the 40 Mile Bush. The line is up from the west end of Roys Hill where the only sight [site] for a bridge can be got and a good sight. I pointed that out to Weber some years ago. Then up past my place and up Carlyon road to the top of the first range then deverge off on the line. I always said should been boken and come out at Ormond's bush. On that line there is onley one bridge wanted and the timber is allong side of it. Besides it is direct to the plains and shorter a good deal. If that was onley carryed out then a village at [A]orangi close to the accomodation house and a small church would follow. If you cannot see the force and advantage of this to the country it is no use

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English (MD)

for me to say any more if you do not do your utmost in this particular direction. I hear it mutt[er]ed that Stoaks [Stokes] has bought you over to have the road through his property. I do not believe you could allow that as the f[e]atures of the country favours my way and if Weber's word is worth anything he told me long ago it was the best way for the road. Of course it will be sometime before you may commence but there is nothing like working out in time. Perhaps we may have gold here before long and if so that will healp the matter greatly. I am busy at preasant colecting speciments [specimens] from the back country which I hope to get some good ones next week to send to Mr Hart

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English (MD)

and yourself. I hope you will gave some care to what I have said in this letter.


Always your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

19 August 1869

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I see with much pleasure that you are getting on well with all the measures you bring before the house. I had a strong idaia that things would go well from the first but I am happy to see they are even going better than I expected now that you are instaled secure and firm. We must not allow you to pass over this districk as you did when Superintendent. You must know that we are all quite allive to what can be done for to benefit us all and if know one will lift their voice in the matter I must try what I can do. In the first place we want the mail by this road to Hamden and a mail cart to take it that far. Carlyon I dare say will gave you his version off it. A small subsidey would enable a man to start. I have been at Skellicorn about it and told him Carlyon would suport him if he would gave an estimate what he could do it for besides his chance on the road with passengers and goods. Now as the Postmaster General is the man the map of the country would show him this is the most direct line and why not let us have the advantage. Politicks have nothing to do with the justice of this clame. The other side of the country got everything there own way two long and it is high time for us this side to look to ourselves. In the 2nd place you have got the Road Bill before the House and from what I can see it will be carried also. If so you will surely never allow the mane road to go out of the most direct line through the 40 Mile Bush. The line is up from the west end of Roys Hill where the only sight [site] for a bridge can be got and a good sight. I pointed that out to Weber some years ago. Then up past my place and up Carlyon road to the top of the first range then deverge off on the line. I always said should been boken and come out at Ormond's bush. On that line there is onley one bridge wanted and the timber is allong side of it. Besides it is direct to the plains and shorter a good deal. If that was onley carryed out then a village at [A]orangi close to the accomodation house and a small church would follow. If you cannot see the force and advantage of this to the country it is no use for me to say any more if you do not do your utmost in this particular direction. I hear it mutt[er]ed that Stoaks [Stokes] has bought you over to have the road through his property. I do not believe you could allow that as the f[e]atures of the country favours my way and if Weber's word is worth anything he told me long ago it was the best way for the road. Of course it will be sometime before you may commence but there is nothing like working out in time. Perhaps we may have gold here before long and if so that will healp the matter greatly. I am busy at preasant colecting speciments [specimens] from the back country which I hope to get some good ones next week to send to Mr Hart and yourself. I hope you will gave some care to what I have said in this letter.


Always your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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