Object #1012329 from MS-Papers-0032-0534

2 pages written 25 Aug 1865 by an unknown author in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items). 33 letters written from Wellington, Turanganui, Ngatapa, Napier and Nelson, 1865-1870, & undated. Includes letter from Richmond to Ormond, Oct 1868; McLean to Richmond, 7 Jan 1869. Also piece-level inventory.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)


We hope the Governor may so order the Troops at Hawke's Bay, as to release all the Colonial forces; and if that is done, we shall leave a good deal of discretion with you, at what point to apply your reinforcement. My own idea is that unless actual hostilities or outrages have begun elsewhere than at Waiapu, it would be best to place a garrison of Regulars at Poverty Bay, and to concentrate our moveable men to the Northwards, so as to enable Fraser and Mokena to sweep the promontory clear of the Hau Haus. If, however, the fires at Poverty Bay, which Smith reports to have been seen by the "St. Kilda" coming South, were burning houses, and the outbreak has actually begun, then it might change the aspect of things.

Orders have been sent to Mackay and Mainwaring to enter into friendly relations with Thompson. I do not know that any permanent good can be hoped from such dealings; but in the present crisis, time is a valuable element; and it will be a great thing for facilitating future peace to prevent Thompson and his friends from compromising themselves further.

We shall do all we can to keep the Arawas in the field. I hope they will not get into any difficulty by too great impetuosity. I think there is little fear, for 400 or 500 well-armed natives is as large a force as you can easily get together anywhere at the present time, and I hardly think they can find their match in numbers and appointments. I hope the Opotiki men will not be many days before they start. Remember me to Mr, Wilkinson when you see him, and believe me -


ever faithfully yours (Signed)
W. Richmond.

English (ATL)

COPY Wellington
August 25th, 1865


My dear Maclean,

We are all highly gratified at the pluck and modesty of your Captain Fraser and his men. The Government are doubly their debtors. They owe them thanks in common with the rest of the Colony; and also for justifying a policy which trusts to the firm qualities of our own people.

Owing to the delay on the part of the regular forces, in occupying Pipiriki, we have not yet got Brassey and his men started for Opotiki. but measures have been taken to hasten their departure.

Your reports about Poverty Bay and Tologa are very serious looking. I think it is clear we must bring every energy to bear at once on this seat of evil. The fault has been all along a want of concentration and exasiveness.

We hope the Governor may so order the Troops at Hawke's Bay, as to release all the Colonial forces; and if that is done, we shall leave a good deal of discretion with you, at what point to apply your reinforcement. My own idea is that unless actual hostilities or outrages have begun elsewhere than at Waiapu, it would be best to place a garrison of Regulars at Poverty Bay, and to concentrate our moveable men to the Northwards, so as to enable Fraser and Mokena to sweep the promontory clear of the Hau Haus. If, however, the fires at Poverty Bay, which Smith reports to have been seen by the "St. Kilda" coming South, were burning houses, and the outbreak has actually begun, then it might change the aspect of things.

Orders have been sent to Mackay and Mainwaring to enter into friendly relations with Thompson. I do not know that any permanent good can be hoped from such dealings; but in the present crisis, time is a valuable element; and it will be a great thing for facilitating future peace to prevent Thompson and his friends from compromising themselves further.

We shall do all we can to keep the Arawas in the field. I hope they will not get into any difficulty by too great impetuosity. I think there is little fear, for 400 or 500 well-armed natives is as large a force as you can easily get together anywhere at the present time, and I hardly think they can find their match in numbers and appointments. I hope the Opotiki men will not be many days before they start. Remember me to Mr, Wilkinson when you see him, and believe me -


ever faithfully yours (Signed)
W. Richmond.

Part of:
Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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