Object #1012001 from MS-Papers-0032-0218

4 pages written 16 May 1874 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0218 (56 digitised items). 50 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland and Waimate, 1871-1876

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Wellington
16th. May 1874.


My dear Mr. McLean,

I have not been able to make any communication to you in reference to native affairs for one very good reason. I have not known where to address my letters. I now hear that you are at the Union Club Sydney. Native matters are going on smoothly but one or two occurrences have caused a little anxiety which I will shortly state.

1st. You will remember that just on your leaving for Sydney our Surveyors were stopped near Waingongoro. I set the telegraph to work to ascertain the cause and am happy to tell you that the misunderstanding simply arose from what I consider Captn. Blakes neglect of duty when this was discovered it was easy to remedy what I feared at one time had some political significance. Parris set all things

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English (ATL)

right and our work is going on again.

The second occurrence of any importance was the murder at Whangaroa near the Bay of Islands. The incentive to commite the crime was a very aggravated one. From last report it would appear that the natives are going to give him up to be tried.

The third case was the shooting by that mad fellow McDonald of one of the coach horses on the Oroua or rather Awakuri Bridge. The natives disavow having anything to do in the matter and say that he must bear the consequences of the mad act. McDonald was arrested and preliminary investigation before R.M. held at Whanganui and of course fully committed to take his trial in Supreme Court. He has put his foot into it this time and it would be the best thing possible if he is removed for a time from amongst the Ngatikauhata.

Almost all the Crown Grants have been delivered. But the Award Native

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English (ATL)

Land Court altered by yourself still sticks fast. The Attorney General cannot see his way out of the mess.

Rogan has been working very hard on the West Coast and has pretty well closed up everything he has taken in hand, and in the main most satisfactorily. He has been ordered to Auckland to settle the rules of practice N.L. Court - Smith goes to. Fenton appears to be in earnest now. What a deliverance it will be when he is away! Dr. Pollen seems thoroughly disgusted with him. Mr. Mainwaring seems to be getting on most satisfactorily with the natives - his reports are interesting. His wife is with him.

Young is gone across the straits with Wi Tako and Wi Parata. He telegraphs that he has no difficulty with the natives.

Parris is going in most satisfactorily with his land purchasing arrangements. He has just closed for another block of considerable extent.

Halse has come back. He has lots to

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English (ATL)

talk about. He has not furnished his report. I almost dread the infliction. Office work is pretty close up - there are some things that I don't like even to take before Pollen.

I shall be glad when you come back for reasons which I will state.

Dr. Pollen and I get on well together. He is putting the Provincial Govt. of Wellington through their pacings - they find him pretty tough and obstinate at times.

With regard to an acting Chief Judge for Native Lands Court - after calmly looking at the matter I think it will be necessary to appoint an outsider. I do not think old Mr. Maning will do. He has no administrative ability - then if you appoint anyone of the other Judges he may set up his back. We want a good man acquainted with law. Who to suggest I don't know.


I must close this. Very faithfully yours,
Hy. T. Clarke.

English (ATL)

Wellington
16th. May 1874.


My dear Mr. McLean,

I have not been able to make any communication to you in reference to native affairs for one very good reason. I have not known where to address my letters. I now hear that you are at the Union Club Sydney. Native matters are going on smoothly but one or two occurrences have caused a little anxiety which I will shortly state.

1st. You will remember that just on your leaving for Sydney our Surveyors were stopped near Waingongoro. I set the telegraph to work to ascertain the cause and am happy to tell you that the misunderstanding simply arose from what I consider Captn. Blakes neglect of duty when this was discovered it was easy to remedy what I feared at one time had some political significance. Parris set all things right and our work is going on again.

The second occurrence of any importance was the murder at Whangaroa near the Bay of Islands. The incentive to commite the crime was a very aggravated one. From last report it would appear that the natives are going to give him up to be tried.

The third case was the shooting by that mad fellow McDonald of one of the coach horses on the Oroua or rather Awakuri Bridge. The natives disavow having anything to do in the matter and say that he must bear the consequences of the mad act. McDonald was arrested and preliminary investigation before R.M. held at Whanganui and of course fully committed to take his trial in Supreme Court. He has put his foot into it this time and it would be the best thing possible if he is removed for a time from amongst the Ngatikauhata.

Almost all the Crown Grants have been delivered. But the Award Native Land Court altered by yourself still sticks fast. The Attorney General cannot see his way out of the mess.

Rogan has been working very hard on the West Coast and has pretty well closed up everything he has taken in hand, and in the main most satisfactorily. He has been ordered to Auckland to settle the rules of practice N.L. Court - Smith goes to. Fenton appears to be in earnest now. What a deliverance it will be when he is away! Dr. Pollen seems thoroughly disgusted with him. Mr. Mainwaring seems to be getting on most satisfactorily with the natives - his reports are interesting. His wife is with him.

Young is gone across the straits with Wi Tako and Wi Parata. He telegraphs that he has no difficulty with the natives.

Parris is going in most satisfactorily with his land purchasing arrangements. He has just closed for another block of considerable extent.

Halse has come back. He has lots to talk about. He has not furnished his report. I almost dread the infliction. Office work is pretty close up - there are some things that I don't like even to take before Pollen.

I shall be glad when you come back for reasons which I will state.

Dr. Pollen and I get on well together. He is putting the Provincial Govt. of Wellington through their pacings - they find him pretty tough and obstinate at times.

With regard to an acting Chief Judge for Native Lands Court - after calmly looking at the matter I think it will be necessary to appoint an outsider. I do not think old Mr. Maning will do. He has no administrative ability - then if you appoint anyone of the other Judges he may set up his back. We want a good man acquainted with law. Who to suggest I don't know.


I must close this. Very faithfully yours,
Hy. T. Clarke.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0218 (56 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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