Object #1011844 from MS-Papers-0032-0031

4 pages written 20 Dec 1873 by E T Brissenden to Sir Donald McLean in Auckland Region

From: Native Minister - Administration of native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0031 (44 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Memorandum No. 4,

To the Honourable Donald McLean on Native matters generally in the Province of Auckland.

I found on my arrival here, that a ring had been formed for the acquiring of native lands in opposition to Government. They represent considerable capital. I have mixed freely with the members of the ring, and as they think, that I am in opposition to the Government they addressed themselves openly to me for advice etc. It is useless for me to go into particulars more than to state that they are now a disorganized party, and at a meeting yesterday, they concluded to suspend operations, and recall their negotiators, and others connected with the venture, so they are out of the field, I am satisfied that no more companies will be formed for the same purpose in this part

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English (ATL)

of the Province.

In reference to a writ issued against Henare Pukuatua for £505 - mentioned in a former memo. to you, Mr. Fitzgerald gave me authority to stay proceedings at Maketu which I acted on so far as possible but as the writ was issued from the Supreme Court, it was Fitzgerald's place to withdraw proceedings here, this has not been done, judgment will be obtained, which will be most unfair. However I have seen Mr. Fitzgerald he has agreed to accept the sum of £250 - Two hundred and Fifty Pounds stg. in satisfaction of his claim, he shows me by account that he is a loser by the amount of £200.

I have received letters from Wm. Moon on behalf of himself and Drummond Hay, speaking in strong terms, and with threats against the Government, this makes me feel uneasy about the Ngatiraukawa people and I shall therefore leave here for the Waikato in a day or two, and endevour to make things safe.

I have little in the way of news to report from this place

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English (ATL)

except that all business affairs are much depressed. The session of the Provincial Council is over, Williamson appears to have been successful in dealing with his Council, they have given him four months supplies, and have adjourned until May next.

Nothing special bearing upon native matters transpired in the Council excepting the following resolution which was passed unanimously.

"That with reference to the provision made by the General Assembly during the session of 1873 for the acquisition of lands from Native Owners in the Province of Auckland, it is, the opinion of this Council, desirable that, before the purchase of any block of land be effected, the superintendent of the Province, should be consulted as to the situation and quality of the land, and as to its general adaptability for the location of immigrants, and for general purposes of settlement."

From conversation which I have had with the Provincial executive I understand that the only effect intended by the resolution is to induce you to give the preference in your negotiations to lands suitable for agricultural purposes and to acquire

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English (ATL)

such as speedily as possible.

Native matters in this part are unusually quiet, the disturbances on the West Coast between the Ngatiraukawas and the Nuaupoko, does not seem to have attracted notice from the Maori population in this part of the Province.

I have been quietly making inquiries about the proposed rushing of Ohinemurie, I am satisfied that no such attempt will be made.

It is got up by some political agitators at the Thames to make political capital for themselves. A few respectable people are concerned but the sole idea is to put pressure on the Government, to set about the purchase of lands as quickly as possible the money said to have been subscribed only existed on paper. The local paper the "Advertiser" has been fomenting the agitation but the Honble. W. O'Rorke in concert with the provincial authorities has kept the Auckland press in hand. A better feeling is now prevalent amongst the more intelligent miners who begin to see that threats and strong talk is likely to delay rather than hasten the opening of the Upper Thames, indeed the opposition to Government in all Maori matters ia gradually dying.


E. T. Brissenden
Auckland
20 Dec. 1873

English (ATL)

Memorandum No. 4,

To the Honourable Donald McLean on Native matters generally in the Province of Auckland.

I found on my arrival here, that a ring had been formed for the acquiring of native lands in opposition to Government. They represent considerable capital. I have mixed freely with the members of the ring, and as they think, that I am in opposition to the Government they addressed themselves openly to me for advice etc. It is useless for me to go into particulars more than to state that they are now a disorganized party, and at a meeting yesterday, they concluded to suspend operations, and recall their negotiators, and others connected with the venture, so they are out of the field, I am satisfied that no more companies will be formed for the same purpose in this part of the Province.

In reference to a writ issued against Henare Pukuatua for £505 - mentioned in a former memo. to you, Mr. Fitzgerald gave me authority to stay proceedings at Maketu which I acted on so far as possible but as the writ was issued from the Supreme Court, it was Fitzgerald's place to withdraw proceedings here, this has not been done, judgment will be obtained, which will be most unfair. However I have seen Mr. Fitzgerald he has agreed to accept the sum of £250 - Two hundred and Fifty Pounds stg. in satisfaction of his claim, he shows me by account that he is a loser by the amount of £200.

I have received letters from Wm. Moon on behalf of himself and Drummond Hay, speaking in strong terms, and with threats against the Government, this makes me feel uneasy about the Ngatiraukawa people and I shall therefore leave here for the Waikato in a day or two, and endevour to make things safe.

I have little in the way of news to report from this place except that all business affairs are much depressed. The session of the Provincial Council is over, Williamson appears to have been successful in dealing with his Council, they have given him four months supplies, and have adjourned until May next.

Nothing special bearing upon native matters transpired in the Council excepting the following resolution which was passed unanimously.

"That with reference to the provision made by the General Assembly during the session of 1873 for the acquisition of lands from Native Owners in the Province of Auckland, it is, the opinion of this Council, desirable that, before the purchase of any block of land be effected, the superintendent of the Province, should be consulted as to the situation and quality of the land, and as to its general adaptability for the location of immigrants, and for general purposes of settlement."

From conversation which I have had with the Provincial executive I understand that the only effect intended by the resolution is to induce you to give the preference in your negotiations to lands suitable for agricultural purposes and to acquire such as speedily as possible.

Native matters in this part are unusually quiet, the disturbances on the West Coast between the Ngatiraukawas and the Nuaupoko, does not seem to have attracted notice from the Maori population in this part of the Province.

I have been quietly making inquiries about the proposed rushing of Ohinemurie, I am satisfied that no such attempt will be made.

It is got up by some political agitators at the Thames to make political capital for themselves. A few respectable people are concerned but the sole idea is to put pressure on the Government, to set about the purchase of lands as quickly as possible the money said to have been subscribed only existed on paper. The local paper the "Advertiser" has been fomenting the agitation but the Honble. W. O'Rorke in concert with the provincial authorities has kept the Auckland press in hand. A better feeling is now prevalent amongst the more intelligent miners who begin to see that threats and strong talk is likely to delay rather than hasten the opening of the Upper Thames, indeed the opposition to Government in all Maori matters ia gradually dying.


E. T. Brissenden
Auckland
20 Dec. 1873

Part of:
Native Minister - Administration of native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0031 (44 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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