Object #1011751 from MS-Papers-0032-0319

4 pages written 14 Apr 1856 by William Halse in Taranaki Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items). 28 letters addressed from New Plymouth & Taranaki

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

COPY. Taranaki
14th. April 1856.


My dear McLean,

I send you a receipt for the £1,000. You need not, I should have thought, been troubled in this matter, seeing that the thing is as plain as possible in my December 1854 accounts. Apropos of the Hua, a difficulty occurs in making out the Grants for the natives. There are 136 of them; the natives having finally arranged the names and particulars at Meetings recently called by Henry. The plans are all ready, original and duplicate, and nothing is wanting but the filling in of the Forms, which is my work. The difficulty consists in, most of the allotments being without roads, - or allowance for roads. It is clear I must not make out a grant for land, which has no road to it. The Form of the Grant states where lines of road have not been determined upon, that A.B. has received an allowance in land for one. The only mode that suggests itself to me, is to drive a road through all the allotments without one;

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English (ATL)

and issuing the grants for the allotments, less the roads. This must now be delayed pending the forthcoming contest with the natives, which threatens a return to the old state of things. Those Ngatiruanui scoundrels are itching for a fight; and an advance party has already arrived at Katatori's pa. Katatori is known to have written to the South for aid, and was the first to resume hostilities, after a long truce, (from which much was expected), by firing upon the Hinia natives whilst they were cultivating land between the two pas. You cannot ride along the Devon road now without seeing natives hurrying to the pa; and mounted messengers, with guns in their hands. Fortunately for us, we are safe; the Government having taken the necessary measures for that. We who called for troops, until we got them, may well congratulate ourselves for having done so; for the end of the quarrel, no one has been able to forsee. There is a talk of some Southern vessels intending to arrive by the beach, which would at once oppose us to them. I do not believe they would attempt it,

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English (ATL)

as the consequences will have occurred to the natives. Whatever happens, God help Arama Karaka, and grant him a full triumph over his bloody enemies.

Our friend Bell beamed upon me for one whole evening, and part of the next morning. Politics have given him a careworn appearance, which he throws off whenever he laughs; which is nearly always.

I wrote by the steamer for an increase of salary, and if you can serve me in this, do so. As a bachelor, I can subsist, but I am looking to a different state; and as there are expenses to be met, quite additional to the present, I trust, not that the Government will consider I am engaged to become a respectable member of society; but that they will do me the justice to pay me according to my office and the work I do for the public. I hope, in considering my salary, the Government will consider that I have been underpaid for five years.

I should write to Rogan, but do not know where he is. I received a letter from him dated Kawhia. I shall probably send him a letter on chance next post.


Yours very truly (Signed)
W. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

COPY. Taranaki
14th. April 1856.


My dear McLean,

I send you a receipt for the £1,000. You need not, I should have thought, been troubled in this matter, seeing that the thing is as plain as possible in my December 1854 accounts. Apropos of the Hua, a difficulty occurs in making out the Grants for the natives. There are 136 of them; the natives having finally arranged the names and particulars at Meetings recently called by Henry. The plans are all ready, original and duplicate, and nothing is wanting but the filling in of the Forms, which is my work. The difficulty consists in, most of the allotments being without roads, - or allowance for roads. It is clear I must not make out a grant for land, which has no road to it. The Form of the Grant states where lines of road have not been determined upon, that A.B. has received an allowance in land for one. The only mode that suggests itself to me, is to drive a road through all the allotments without one; and issuing the grants for the allotments, less the roads. This must now be delayed pending the forthcoming contest with the natives, which threatens a return to the old state of things. Those Ngatiruanui scoundrels are itching for a fight; and an advance party has already arrived at Katatori's pa. Katatori is known to have written to the South for aid, and was the first to resume hostilities, after a long truce, (from which much was expected), by firing upon the Hinia natives whilst they were cultivating land between the two pas. You cannot ride along the Devon road now without seeing natives hurrying to the pa; and mounted messengers, with guns in their hands. Fortunately for us, we are safe; the Government having taken the necessary measures for that. We who called for troops, until we got them, may well congratulate ourselves for having done so; for the end of the quarrel, no one has been able to forsee. There is a talk of some Southern vessels intending to arrive by the beach, which would at once oppose us to them. I do not believe they would attempt it, as the consequences will have occurred to the natives. Whatever happens, God help Arama Karaka, and grant him a full triumph over his bloody enemies.

Our friend Bell beamed upon me for one whole evening, and part of the next morning. Politics have given him a careworn appearance, which he throws off whenever he laughs; which is nearly always.

I wrote by the steamer for an increase of salary, and if you can serve me in this, do so. As a bachelor, I can subsist, but I am looking to a different state; and as there are expenses to be met, quite additional to the present, I trust, not that the Government will consider I am engaged to become a respectable member of society; but that they will do me the justice to pay me according to my office and the work I do for the public. I hope, in considering my salary, the Government will consider that I have been underpaid for five years.

I should write to Rogan, but do not know where he is. I received a letter from him dated Kawhia. I shall probably send him a letter on chance next post.


Yours very truly (Signed)
W. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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