Object #1011674 from MS-Papers-0032-0828

6 pages written 1851 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items). The letters from Donald are written from Porirua Barracks, Otaki, Rangitikei, Waikanae, Wanganui and Taranaki. Susan's letters are addressed from Dalmuir Hill (her parent's home) and Wellington Terrace. Many letters are undated and were written prior to their marriage in Aug 1851. Includes correspondence between Susan McLean and her mother Susan Strang (2 letters, undated); one letter from Helen Anne Wilson to Mrs McLean, 30 August 1852

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Wellington Terrace
[1851]


My dearest husband

I cannot tell you how delighted I was to receive your letter from the Taita. I read it I am sure half a dozen times a day and I put it with your likeness under my pillow every night and look at it whenever I wake in the morning. I trust darling that you will have some other opportunities of writing to me on your way to Ahuriri. I have felt very lonely since you left. I never sit in the parlour. I cannot sit alone in that room where I have spent so many happy hours with my dear husband without feeling very dull. After you went away on Tuesday I did not know what to do with

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English (MD)

myself. I wandered from one room to another. To sit down was impossible. At last I went and sat down on a place on the hill at the back of the house from which I could see the road past Government House. I thought it was possible I might have a chance of again seeing you for I could see everything very distinctly and I was sure I would know your grey horse if I saw it pass. After sitting there for about an hour I was rewarded for doing so by seeing you and Mr Williamson pass the Court House. I watched you till you disappeared at McBeth's. I then went down and met Papa coming up to see me. He insisted on my going home with him so I did. It was not till I came home again that I felt how dreadfully lonely the house was without my darling husband. Everything seemed changed. I tried to read but I could not understand a word of what I was reading. I went to bed early. I spent a

Page 3 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

very restless night. I got up at daylight and wandered up and down the house for I could not sleep. I do not now feel so dull. I begin to get reconciled to your absence and I look forward to the happiness of our meeting again. I do not feel my own dearest anxious about you for I know my dear husband that you are under the care of a kind and merciful God who will protect you from all danger and bring you back in safety. How thankful I feel to Him for having united us for life and I trust dear Donald we may so live that not even death will separate us but that we may meet again to spend an eternity together.

Dear Mama is I am happy to say rather better this last three days. I am glad to see that she begins to have a little appetite. I am sure when the fine weather comes that she will get quite strong again.

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English (MD)

I hope I shall be able to persuade her to stay with me for a little time. I was up both Wednesday and Thursday but I did not go today as the weather was very bad. Papa was here today for a long time on his way home. I received an invitation for us yesterday to go to a ball at Colonel Gold's tonight. I suppose they did not know that you were gone. I sent an apology to Mrs Gold this morning. I suppose I must call as there were cards sent along with the invitation. I do not know whether I should do so or not before your return. I must ask some persons' opinions on the subject. I understand the ball on Wednesday went off very well but I have seen no one who was at it yet. I had several visitors yesterday but I did not see any of them as I was up at Mama's by one o'clock. Of course I cannot be expected to

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English (MD)

be at home now. A letter came for you from Mr Duncan. I opened it to see what he said about your things. They are on board a vessel which may be expected every day. I suppose it would have been here by this time but the wind has been contrary. I felt so annoyed when I found that I had been forgot your brush. I did not observe that it had been forgotten till the morning after you started. I shall send it by the first opportunity. I could send it now but there may be letters for you in a few weeks and it will be as well to make one parcel. I should like darling to go on writing to you but it is late past 10 and I must go to bed for I wish to get up early in the morning as I have something to do for Mama. I must not forget to tell you that

Page 6 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

I have really got rid of my cold. I shall take care that I do not catch another while you are away. I must now my own dearest husband bid you good night. May God bless and preserve you and bring you back in safety to your affectionate wife.


Susan D McLean

I think I shall be able to get this letter sent by the Rose which has not left yet as the wind is against it, is it not fortunate I do not know whether it is in the harbour or at Evan's Bay. I am sure however Mr Moore who is the agent will get it sent if possible. Be sure love that you take care of yourself and not get rheumatism.

English (MD)

Wellington Terrace
[1851]


My dearest husband

I cannot tell you how delighted I was to receive your letter from the Taita. I read it I am sure half a dozen times a day and I put it with your likeness under my pillow every night and look at it whenever I wake in the morning. I trust darling that you will have some other opportunities of writing to me on your way to Ahuriri. I have felt very lonely since you left. I never sit in the parlour. I cannot sit alone in that room where I have spent so many happy hours with my dear husband without feeling very dull. After you went away on Tuesday I did not know what to do with myself. I wandered from one room to another. To sit down was impossible. At last I went and sat down on a place on the hill at the back of the house from which I could see the road past Government House. I thought it was possible I might have a chance of again seeing you for I could see everything very distinctly and I was sure I would know your grey horse if I saw it pass. After sitting there for about an hour I was rewarded for doing so by seeing you and Mr Williamson pass the Court House. I watched you till you disappeared at McBeth's. I then went down and met Papa coming up to see me. He insisted on my going home with him so I did. It was not till I came home again that I felt how dreadfully lonely the house was without my darling husband. Everything seemed changed. I tried to read but I could not understand a word of what I was reading. I went to bed early. I spent a very restless night. I got up at daylight and wandered up and down the house for I could not sleep. I do not now feel so dull. I begin to get reconciled to your absence and I look forward to the happiness of our meeting again. I do not feel my own dearest anxious about you for I know my dear husband that you are under the care of a kind and merciful God who will protect you from all danger and bring you back in safety. How thankful I feel to Him for having united us for life and I trust dear Donald we may so live that not even death will separate us but that we may meet again to spend an eternity together.

Dear Mama is I am happy to say rather better this last three days. I am glad to see that she begins to have a little appetite. I am sure when the fine weather comes that she will get quite strong again. I hope I shall be able to persuade her to stay with me for a little time. I was up both Wednesday and Thursday but I did not go today as the weather was very bad. Papa was here today for a long time on his way home. I received an invitation for us yesterday to go to a ball at Colonel Gold's tonight. I suppose they did not know that you were gone. I sent an apology to Mrs Gold this morning. I suppose I must call as there were cards sent along with the invitation. I do not know whether I should do so or not before your return. I must ask some persons' opinions on the subject. I understand the ball on Wednesday went off very well but I have seen no one who was at it yet. I had several visitors yesterday but I did not see any of them as I was up at Mama's by one o'clock. Of course I cannot be expected to be at home now. A letter came for you from Mr Duncan. I opened it to see what he said about your things. They are on board a vessel which may be expected every day. I suppose it would have been here by this time but the wind has been contrary. I felt so annoyed when I found that I had been forgot your brush. I did not observe that it had been forgotten till the morning after you started. I shall send it by the first opportunity. I could send it now but there may be letters for you in a few weeks and it will be as well to make one parcel. I should like darling to go on writing to you but it is late past 10 and I must go to bed for I wish to get up early in the morning as I have something to do for Mama. I must not forget to tell you that I have really got rid of my cold. I shall take care that I do not catch another while you are away. I must now my own dearest husband bid you good night. May God bless and preserve you and bring you back in safety to your affectionate wife.


Susan D McLean

I think I shall be able to get this letter sent by the Rose which has not left yet as the wind is against it, is it not fortunate I do not know whether it is in the harbour or at Evan's Bay. I am sure however Mr Moore who is the agent will get it sent if possible. Be sure love that you take care of yourself and not get rheumatism.

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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