Object #1011412 from MS-Papers-0032-0826

7 pages written 23 Aug 1850 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward and outward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0826 (43 digitised items). Mainly letters between Susan Strang and her future husband Donald McLean. Includes a letter from her mother Susannah Strang to McLean, 1849; letter from E Shand to Susan Strang, written from Portobello, 1850 in which she gives her impressions of Dunedin

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
August 23rd 1850


My dear Mr McLean

Mr & Mrs Kirton, with some other friends who have been spending the evening with us, have just left and although it is very late I shall sit up to write to you as I may be prevented from doing so tomorrow. Why do

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English (MD)

you find fault with me for neglect in writing? I am sure I did not deserve a scold for that as I have only missed one opportunity lately and by that mail I fully intended to have written but Dr Forbes came to dinner on Saturday and prevented me and on Monday I had not time to write before Papa left. I can assure you that nothing gives me so much pleasure as writing to you and when anything occurs to prevent me I always feel very much disappointed. I wrote to you last Friday and since then I have heard nothing which would interest you. The weather for the last week has been very fine. It is quite like summer. The spring has commenced early this year. The trees are

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English (MD)

all covered with buds and some of the gardens begin to look very well. Before I sat down to write the beauty of the night tempted me to take a walk in the garden. It reminded me of the evening we walked home from Mr Kirton's house. Do you remember it dear? We had a delightful walk that night. It was so quiet. I wonder when

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English (MD)

we are to have such another. How very beautiful the moonlight nights are in New Zealand. I am sure they must be delightful in the bush. I am often inclined to envy you for you must see a great deal to admire. I was in hopes that you would come in with Mr Hickson for a few days and as I heard

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English (MD)

he was expected home on Wednesday I often during the evening went to the door thinking I might see you. I was quite disappointed when I heard on Thursday night that he had come in alone but I hope it will not be long now till I see you. Did I tell you in my last letter that I have sent the collar to Mrs Durie. In one of your letters you kindly offered to take it yourself and apologize for me but as you once before gave Mrs Durie such a bad character of me I was afraid to trust you so I sent it by the last mail with a note. Talking of Mrs Durie's collar reminds me that I promised to

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English (MD)

make a watch guard for you. It has not been forgotten but I have been unable to find braid to make it. I intend to crochet one but I fear you will not like it so well as a guard made of braid as it will not be so strong.

I must now conclude as I do not feel well. I have got a bad

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English (MD)

cold. Mama sends her kindest regards and believe me to remain


Ever your affectionate
Susan D Strang

My letter is so ill-written that I fear you will scarcely be able to read it but I am sure dear you will excuse it as I am really very unwell.

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
August 23rd 1850


My dear Mr McLean

Mr & Mrs Kirton, with some other friends who have been spending the evening with us, have just left and although it is very late I shall sit up to write to you as I may be prevented from doing so tomorrow. Why do you find fault with me for neglect in writing? I am sure I did not deserve a scold for that as I have only missed one opportunity lately and by that mail I fully intended to have written but Dr Forbes came to dinner on Saturday and prevented me and on Monday I had not time to write before Papa left. I can assure you that nothing gives me so much pleasure as writing to you and when anything occurs to prevent me I always feel very much disappointed. I wrote to you last Friday and since then I have heard nothing which would interest you. The weather for the last week has been very fine. It is quite like summer. The spring has commenced early this year. The trees are all covered with buds and some of the gardens begin to look very well. Before I sat down to write the beauty of the night tempted me to take a walk in the garden. It reminded me of the evening we walked home from Mr Kirton's house. Do you remember it dear? We had a delightful walk that night. It was so quiet. I wonder when we are to have such another. How very beautiful the moonlight nights are in New Zealand. I am sure they must be delightful in the bush. I am often inclined to envy you for you must see a great deal to admire. I was in hopes that you would come in with Mr Hickson for a few days and as I heard he was expected home on Wednesday I often during the evening went to the door thinking I might see you. I was quite disappointed when I heard on Thursday night that he had come in alone but I hope it will not be long now till I see you. Did I tell you in my last letter that I have sent the collar to Mrs Durie. In one of your letters you kindly offered to take it yourself and apologize for me but as you once before gave Mrs Durie such a bad character of me I was afraid to trust you so I sent it by the last mail with a note. Talking of Mrs Durie's collar reminds me that I promised to make a watch guard for you. It has not been forgotten but I have been unable to find braid to make it. I intend to crochet one but I fear you will not like it so well as a guard made of braid as it will not be so strong.

I must now conclude as I do not feel well. I have got a bad cold. Mama sends her kindest regards and believe me to remain


Ever your affectionate
Susan D Strang

My letter is so ill-written that I fear you will scarcely be able to read it but I am sure dear you will excuse it as I am really very unwell.

Part of:
Inward and outward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0826 (43 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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