Object #1011163 from MS-Papers-0032-0277

4 pages written 11 Jan 1845 by Thomas Spencer Forsaith in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Surnames, Foo - Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0277 (37 digitised items). Correspondents:A Cracroft Fookes, Wanganui, 1873 (1 letter); James Foot, Point Russell (Waikato), 1870 (1 letter); Charles Forbes, Manawatu Ferry, undated letter; Father J Forest, Napier, 1865-1873 (3 letters); Thomas Spencer Forsaith, Waingaroa, Wellington, Wainui & Auckland,1844-1858 (8 letters).Also: P Fortescue, Patea, Napier & Akitio, 1864-1871 (3 letters); Miss Eliza Foster, undated letter; Frederick A C Foster, Wellington, 1869 (2 letters); John Foster, undated letter; R N Foster, Mount Erin (Havelock), 1867 (1 letter); Ebenezer Fox, London, Wellington & Auckland, 1872-1875 & undated (3 letters); Edward Thomas Fox, Wanganui, 1856-1874 (9 letters); James G Fox, Wellington, 1870-1871 (3 letters).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Wellington.
January 11, 1845.


My Dear Sir,

I have been so very busy since my arrival here that I have not had time to write you before, but embrace a few leisure moments to do so now. We are in the midst of strife in this district, the Natives, as I expected refuse to leave the Hutt altho' payment has been made according to agreement to Rauparaha. Rangihaeta whose name is also to the agreement it is said is secretly encouraging the Natives in their refusal to remove. How the matter will end I know not. It has been left to the Governor, who I think will not be trifled with in this matter. George Clarke has returned to Auckland in the Brig and I believe will shortly leave the Department altogether but you probably saw him as the Brig touched at Taranaki on her route to Auckland. Respecting your district I fear there is still some trouble in store for you, the absentee claimants here seem very much dissatisfied with the arrangement made and their claims I fear will hardly be met by the funds reserved for that purpose, but I think it will be advisable for you to send me by return of post a copy of the boundaries of the block purchased, in case I should be able to make any arrangement with them here without the trouble which would inevitably attend a visit from them to Taranaki. When they first heard of it they were talking

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English (ATL)

about proceeding to Taranaki on a sally forthwith but this I succeeded in preventing some few I understand have set out - but not many.

The all absorbing topics of conversation here, are the question of the Hutt and the result of the Committee of the House of Commons deliberation at Home. Rumour says that the report of the Comee. is highly favorable to the views of the Company and condemnatory of the proceedings of the Government It is asserted that the treaty of Waitangi is condemned and regarded as impolitic and unjust and that in future all Lands not actually occupied or cultivated by the Natives, are to be considered as demesne Land, of the Crown. How this is to be reconciled with the whole policy of Government during the last four years I cannot conceive and am quite certain that such a principle cannot now be established but at the point of the bayonet. The "Caledonia" a vessel despatched by the Company to bring out despatches relative to this subject has just hove in sight so we shall soon hear particulars -

The day before I left your house I brought a book from Mr. Blacks entitled "The Natural History of Enthusiasm" which belongs to Mr. Clarke, intending to bring it with me, but I came away and forgot it. If he has not taken it himself please forward it to his Father at Auckland as early as you can.

The "Hazard" is here from Auckland

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English (ATL)

and I believe will remain, or return here shortly, to act according to the instructions that may come from the Head of the Government respecting the Hutt. Mr. Clarke writes me to say that some great alterations will be made in our department - there is no money - allowance for Natives will probably be wholly discontinued, and a trifling addition to the salary made in lieu of it. To tell you the truth I am getting heartily tired of the present state of things - instead of being able to do any thing in the legitimate way of our duty, we are continuously in hot water pleasing neither natives nor Europeans at least it is so here, and if I can see my way clear I should be very much inclined to follow George's example and leave the Department altogether. The mind is kept in a constant strain of worry and excitement which is really distressing when continuing day after day, and then the anomalous position in which the Protector is placed will never do. If Natives are to be frightened or driven away from a cultivation that they have no right to, the Protector must do it - or at least help to do it, which is most inconsistent. I have pointed out these facts to Major Richmond who acknowledges their justness - but says it cannot be avoided, but I mean to protest against it officially the first convenient oppory. But I must conclude. I know not whether you can make out my scrawl, but as usual I am pressed for time, so must bid you farewell. I remain,


Yrs. Truly,
Thomas Forsaith.

Remember me to all enquiring friends.

English (ATL)

Wellington.
January 11, 1845.


My Dear Sir,

I have been so very busy since my arrival here that I have not had time to write you before, but embrace a few leisure moments to do so now. We are in the midst of strife in this district, the Natives, as I expected refuse to leave the Hutt altho' payment has been made according to agreement to Rauparaha. Rangihaeta whose name is also to the agreement it is said is secretly encouraging the Natives in their refusal to remove. How the matter will end I know not. It has been left to the Governor, who I think will not be trifled with in this matter. George Clarke has returned to Auckland in the Brig and I believe will shortly leave the Department altogether but you probably saw him as the Brig touched at Taranaki on her route to Auckland. Respecting your district I fear there is still some trouble in store for you, the absentee claimants here seem very much dissatisfied with the arrangement made and their claims I fear will hardly be met by the funds reserved for that purpose, but I think it will be advisable for you to send me by return of post a copy of the boundaries of the block purchased, in case I should be able to make any arrangement with them here without the trouble which would inevitably attend a visit from them to Taranaki. When they first heard of it they were talking about proceeding to Taranaki on a sally forthwith but this I succeeded in preventing some few I understand have set out - but not many.

The all absorbing topics of conversation here, are the question of the Hutt and the result of the Committee of the House of Commons deliberation at Home. Rumour says that the report of the Comee. is highly favorable to the views of the Company and condemnatory of the proceedings of the Government It is asserted that the treaty of Waitangi is condemned and regarded as impolitic and unjust and that in future all Lands not actually occupied or cultivated by the Natives, are to be considered as demesne Land, of the Crown. How this is to be reconciled with the whole policy of Government during the last four years I cannot conceive and am quite certain that such a principle cannot now be established but at the point of the bayonet. The "Caledonia" a vessel despatched by the Company to bring out despatches relative to this subject has just hove in sight so we shall soon hear particulars -

The day before I left your house I brought a book from Mr. Blacks entitled "The Natural History of Enthusiasm" which belongs to Mr. Clarke, intending to bring it with me, but I came away and forgot it. If he has not taken it himself please forward it to his Father at Auckland as early as you can.

The "Hazard" is here from Auckland and I believe will remain, or return here shortly, to act according to the instructions that may come from the Head of the Government respecting the Hutt. Mr. Clarke writes me to say that some great alterations will be made in our department - there is no money - allowance for Natives will probably be wholly discontinued, and a trifling addition to the salary made in lieu of it. To tell you the truth I am getting heartily tired of the present state of things - instead of being able to do any thing in the legitimate way of our duty, we are continuously in hot water pleasing neither natives nor Europeans at least it is so here, and if I can see my way clear I should be very much inclined to follow George's example and leave the Department altogether. The mind is kept in a constant strain of worry and excitement which is really distressing when continuing day after day, and then the anomalous position in which the Protector is placed will never do. If Natives are to be frightened or driven away from a cultivation that they have no right to, the Protector must do it - or at least help to do it, which is most inconsistent. I have pointed out these facts to Major Richmond who acknowledges their justness - but says it cannot be avoided, but I mean to protest against it officially the first convenient oppory. But I must conclude. I know not whether you can make out my scrawl, but as usual I am pressed for time, so must bid you farewell. I remain,


Yrs. Truly,
Thomas Forsaith.

Remember me to all enquiring friends.

Part of:
Inward letters - Surnames, Foo - Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0277 (37 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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