Object #1011134 from MS-Papers-0032-0540

6 pages written 24 Aug 1857 by John Rogan in Whangaroa

From: Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items). 40 letters written from Awakino, Mokau, New Plymouth, Takatuhi, Whangaroa, Waingohu, Tokatoka (Kaipara), Whakaturai, Auckland, Coromandel, & Sydney (Sep 1858)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

to go on board the "Kenilworth" when we sailed and made a most tedious passage of 16 days. I, however made myself tolerably comfortable having the Carringtons to talk to and carried on a quiet flirtation with Miss, to the mortification of a young cub, who by the way turned out afterwards to be no other than her affianced husband, nothing unusual occurred to me excepting a row which I had with the Captain when we sighted Taranaki which orgiihated in a difference of opinion as to a point of land which was then in view, and as I know that locality well, you may easily imagine I came off victorious. We landed in the evening and the weather being wet the streets were knee deep in mud together with the universally depressed state of New P. so disappointed the poor Carringtons who had visionary ideas of the extreme value of their property there, that they became at once chapfallen to that degree that would excite pity in a sterner individual than myself. I called at Halses and had a satisfactory settlement of all the monies he had received on my a/c which amounted only to £120 --- he explained that Norris could not pay him a balance owing, which was the cause of his not remitting, I took a cheque of Norris' for the £60 of the above amount which has been presented at the Bank in Auckland and dishonored. Only imagine how extremely disgusted I feel at this, to receive only a small sum after 2 years expectation and half the amount no better than waste paper. I can assure you that Taranaki has fallen immeasurably in my estimation. The hospitality of old, still obtains there, which is the only redeeming feature I could discover in it. Sharland gave me a grand champagne dinner, W. Halse, Henry, Watt and R. Brown, being the guests and we talked old times over again. R.B. gave me the next spread and I had a long talk with him on the never to be forgotten swamp case, thanked him for you, for the part he had taken in the matter and wound up by giving him an invitation to stop with us at Auckland should he again pay that City a visit while you and I are there, which which between

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English (ATL)

ourselves is nothing more nor less than an empty compliment as we are not likely to meet there again for any lengthened period. H. Halse next regailed me, W. Halse and Ritchie and invitations without end which I could not nor would avail myself.of. I saw the Dr. who is as jolly as ever, Mrs. W. has sustained some injury or is unwell I dont know which so I did not call. Ritchie breaks out accasionally and falls to work again all right, Webster is like an alderman with a white head, W. Halse is the happiest man in N.P. with his bairn that exceeds of course all creation. Poor Henry is verypoor having a large family around him and is disappointed that he was not permitted to purchase the Waitara which Parris and he believe can be easily accomplished Dorset is the same old stick and is always talking of the Waiwakaiho section which he and the family have been expecting to get for these last 14 years. Polly Hoskin is considerably tamed down by time and circumstances and expressed great disappointment that I did

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English (ATL)

not bring you with me, evidently having an eye to business from a lively recollection of the liberal purchases you have made at her shop in former days. Imlay was away at Whanganui and is secretly disgusted with N.P. is supposed he will eventually leave for the former place which will be a serious loss to little Pedlington. Mr. Weston died while I was there, 'tis said from shear worry disappointment and anxiety of mind, and poor old Homeyer is laying in a very precarious state, having out his throat and subsequently endeavoured to hang himself in consequence of having failed in attempting to farm successfully it is stated that the primary cause of his disarrangement is having taken a farm from Mrs. Smith which became overun with the Scotch thistle, that so affected him both in pocket and in mind. C. Brown I saw for a moment looking poor and miserable, he comes out of cover (the Bush) once a month

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English (ATL)

to buy provisions and is virtually dead to all New Plymouth, I had no time to deliver your message as he evaporated from me in a great hurry, I however sent him word by his former factotum (Batkin). The old Captn. I met accidentally and he gave me a cordial shake of the hand and asked after you very kindly. The present Superintendent is a man who has risen in my opinion very much and I am glad to tell you he is very popular with the people and deservedly so as he has proved himself to be a better man than people suspected and is also a painstaking man of business. To wind up with biography I should fill a letter with gossip in no time were I to outline much more on personalities so I shall defer the remainder until I have the pleasure of seeing you at Auckland.

My official letter will give you some idea of the vast public business transacted by me on account of the Govt. the Ikamoana to wit all of which is about equivalent to nothing.

Parris, W. & H. Halse accompanied me to Waitara whene I parted from the 2 latter and the former accompanied me to Mueri, where old Raumoa's wife was and will you believe me Parris entered the Maori house followed by your humble servant he positively crouched down before the old hag a la Maori and rubbed noses with her according to the most approved method amidst tears etc. which was too much for me and was consequently compelled to retire in private and roar for about half an hour to myself. I believe Parris's appointment to be most judicious as he takes a most sensible view of the native question, has a good knowledge of the native language and is a great favorite with the natives throughout the district.

Mokau is settled, Hauhari do.,

Page 6 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

and I am going to pay the last payment for land here tomorrow morning and with the exception of the great length of time it has taken me to accomplish the journey which was not my fault the Govt. will have no reason to complain of me when I arrive. Searancke and I have everything ready to be off to Auckland tomorrow morning but the weather is so bad that I fear we shall not be able to move. I am sorry you have nothing to say definitely in relation to the Otakou runs. I should have thought we would have letters from them before now from Mr. Shaw.

Pray dont think of going south until we reach Auckland in order that we may enjoy the light of your countenance again --- when I shall endeavour to finish my Taranaki tale in mean time


I am yours sincerely,
J. Rogan.

Are you married yet?

English (ATL)

Whangaroa
24th. August 1857.


My dear Sir,

I was delighted with a sight of your handwriting by last mail and particularly with the flourishing account you give of the prosperous state of your affairs in that far famed district of Ahuriri. I wrote you a hurried note while at Mokau and promised to give you a succint account of my trip to Taranaki which I must even now defer in detail until I see you which I hope will be in a few days. When we parted on the wharf I returned to the office, lonely and disconsolate and was bated for an entire week by Takerei and the people who claim Hauraki, which terminated in each party declining to accept the terms proposed for Hauraki and Tawatahi. I lingered about doing little or nothing until it was time to go on board the "Kenilworth" when we sailed and made a most tedious passage of 16 days. I, however made myself tolerably comfortable having the Carringtons to talk to and carried on a quiet flirtation with Miss, to the mortification of a young cub, who by the way turned out afterwards to be no other than her affianced husband, nothing unusual occurred to me excepting a row which I had with the Captain when we sighted Taranaki which orgiihated in a difference of opinion as to a point of land which was then in view, and as I know that locality well, you may easily imagine I came off victorious. We landed in the evening and the weather being wet the streets were knee deep in mud together with the universally depressed state of New P. so disappointed the poor Carringtons who had visionary ideas of the extreme value of their property there, that they became at once chapfallen to that degree that would excite pity in a sterner individual than myself. I called at Halses and had a satisfactory settlement of all the monies he had received on my a/c which amounted only to £120 --- he explained that Norris could not pay him a balance owing, which was the cause of his not remitting, I took a cheque of Norris' for the £60 of the above amount which has been presented at the Bank in Auckland and dishonored. Only imagine how extremely disgusted I feel at this, to receive only a small sum after 2 years expectation and half the amount no better than waste paper. I can assure you that Taranaki has fallen immeasurably in my estimation. The hospitality of old, still obtains there, which is the only redeeming feature I could discover in it. Sharland gave me a grand champagne dinner, W. Halse, Henry, Watt and R. Brown, being the guests and we talked old times over again. R.B. gave me the next spread and I had a long talk with him on the never to be forgotten swamp case, thanked him for you, for the part he had taken in the matter and wound up by giving him an invitation to stop with us at Auckland should he again pay that City a visit while you and I are there, which which between ourselves is nothing more nor less than an empty compliment as we are not likely to meet there again for any lengthened period. H. Halse next regailed me, W. Halse and Ritchie and invitations without end which I could not nor would avail myself.of. I saw the Dr. who is as jolly as ever, Mrs. W. has sustained some injury or is unwell I dont know which so I did not call. Ritchie breaks out accasionally and falls to work again all right, Webster is like an alderman with a white head, W. Halse is the happiest man in N.P. with his bairn that exceeds of course all creation. Poor Henry is verypoor having a large family around him and is disappointed that he was not permitted to purchase the Waitara which Parris and he believe can be easily accomplished Dorset is the same old stick and is always talking of the Waiwakaiho section which he and the family have been expecting to get for these last 14 years. Polly Hoskin is considerably tamed down by time and circumstances and expressed great disappointment that I did not bring you with me, evidently having an eye to business from a lively recollection of the liberal purchases you have made at her shop in former days. Imlay was away at Whanganui and is secretly disgusted with N.P. is supposed he will eventually leave for the former place which will be a serious loss to little Pedlington. Mr. Weston died while I was there, 'tis said from shear worry disappointment and anxiety of mind, and poor old Homeyer is laying in a very precarious state, having out his throat and subsequently endeavoured to hang himself in consequence of having failed in attempting to farm successfully it is stated that the primary cause of his disarrangement is having taken a farm from Mrs. Smith which became overun with the Scotch thistle, that so affected him both in pocket and in mind. C. Brown I saw for a moment looking poor and miserable, he comes out of cover (the Bush) once a month to buy provisions and is virtually dead to all New Plymouth, I had no time to deliver your message as he evaporated from me in a great hurry, I however sent him word by his former factotum (Batkin). The old Captn. I met accidentally and he gave me a cordial shake of the hand and asked after you very kindly. The present Superintendent is a man who has risen in my opinion very much and I am glad to tell you he is very popular with the people and deservedly so as he has proved himself to be a better man than people suspected and is also a painstaking man of business. To wind up with biography I should fill a letter with gossip in no time were I to outline much more on personalities so I shall defer the remainder until I have the pleasure of seeing you at Auckland.

My official letter will give you some idea of the vast public business transacted by me on account of the Govt. the Ikamoana to wit all of which is about equivalent to nothing.

Parris, W. & H. Halse accompanied me to Waitara whene I parted from the 2 latter and the former accompanied me to Mueri, where old Raumoa's wife was and will you believe me Parris entered the Maori house followed by your humble servant he positively crouched down before the old hag a la Maori and rubbed noses with her according to the most approved method amidst tears etc. which was too much for me and was consequently compelled to retire in private and roar for about half an hour to myself. I believe Parris's appointment to be most judicious as he takes a most sensible view of the native question, has a good knowledge of the native language and is a great favorite with the natives throughout the district.

Mokau is settled, Hauhari do., and I am going to pay the last payment for land here tomorrow morning and with the exception of the great length of time it has taken me to accomplish the journey which was not my fault the Govt. will have no reason to complain of me when I arrive. Searancke and I have everything ready to be off to Auckland tomorrow morning but the weather is so bad that I fear we shall not be able to move. I am sorry you have nothing to say definitely in relation to the Otakou runs. I should have thought we would have letters from them before now from Mr. Shaw.

Pray dont think of going south until we reach Auckland in order that we may enjoy the light of your countenance again --- when I shall endeavour to finish my Taranaki tale in mean time


I am yours sincerely,
J. Rogan.

Are you married yet?

Part of:
Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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